TweetReach Blog

Archive for the ‘social media’ tag

Find health support just a click away

without comments

The state of our health isn’t deemed polite conversation by most of society. Navigating the line between getting support from friends and family when you’re going through a hard time and not being the weird uncle who always talks about their colon at Christmas dinner can take some adept balancing.

Fortunately, just as social platforms can serve as support networks for those making physical changes aimed at fitness, they can also serve as support networks for those living with health issues from the temporary (How do I work out with a broken leg?) to those living with chronic illness (How do I restructure my life with this?).

Reaching out on Twitter

Building a supportive community on Twitter is one of the things that makes the platform the most worthwhile, and it can make a huge difference when a recently diagnosed person is able to surround themselves with supportive people dealing with similar health issues a few tweets away. Reaching out can start with browsing this master list of tweet chats and joining in whichever feel most comfortable; general health chats might point to more specific ones, and it’s hard not to find someone to connect with in most tweet chats. Doctors and other medical professionals sometimes host tweet chats in order to help answer questions from the general public. Building twitter lists of who participates in which chats, or is the most helpful in pointing out resources can help sort a barrage of new information.

There are also specific accounts dedicated to any number of health issues; Invisible Illness Wk, for example, connects those living with invisible illnesses in addition to raising awareness of the issues those will invisible, chronic illnesses face to those who are unfamiliar.

On other platforms

Sometimes there’s nothing more helpful than reading about someone else’s experience dealing with what you’re currently going through. Tumblr offers the same capabilities as a blog, but socially enhanced with reblogging and private messaging options, allowing one blog to draw from and connect with another easily, building up a support network without ever leaving the site.

For particular chronic illnesses, medical professionals will often point those newly diagnosed to message boards specific to a certain condition or related conditions. Inspire.com has a range of different communities that offer support, for example.

YouTube is also a popular platform for sharing experiences and getting feedback. Popular YouTuber Hank Green has shared his experience of living with a chronic illness, and the comments show many viewers grateful to see their own experiences mirrored in his video, especially from someone well-regarded and popular.

The bottom line

Ultimately social media helps connect those whose health might keep them from being able to attend a physical support group, and to supplement and organize the information and support they might receive from other sources.

Written by Sarah

February 12th, 2014 at 9:26 am

The Week in Social Analytics #88

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Your Brand Is the Sum of the Stories We Tell About You [from Mack Collier]

“If you connect with your fans, the customers that love you, those fans will work with you to make sure they tell the story about your brand that you want other customers to hear.  Read that again until you understand just how important that is.”

Emphasis original.

5 Twitter Best Practices to Humanize Your Brand [from Social Media Today; written by Monica Jade Romeri]

Humans like to connect with other humans, not faceless corporate robots. (That’s why Merle has a face.)

The Confluence Of Content And Social Media: Insights For Success In 2014 [from Forbes; written by Jayson DeMers]

“One overarching theme in recent research is the benefit of properly targeting your social media efforts. If you want a better understanding of how social media influences your customers’ decisions to purchase your products and services, there are a few important questions that you’ve got to ask. In this case, a bit of smart consumer research will go a long way toward directing your social media strategy.”

6 Reasons Every Brand Should Create Social Video [from Social Times; written by Constance Aguilar]

“Video is quickly becoming the most effective brand marketing tool, and its popularity will continue to rise in 2014. Already 40 percent of the top 1,000 most popular Instagram videos are from brands, and a branded Vine video is four times more likely to be seen than a regular branded video.”

Millennials’ Social Media Posts Influence Peers to Buy New Products [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Millennials are significantly more likely than older generations to be influenced by their friends’ social media posts about products and services. According to January 2014 polling conducted by Harris Interactive for The Webby Awards, 68% of 18-to-34-year-old social media users surveyed were at least somewhat likely to make a purchase after seeing a friend’s post.”

Social Media and Millennials: How They Shop [from Heidi Cohen]

“Less than 1 in 6 social media influenced millennials shop exclusively in stores.”

If this is your target demographic and you’re selling on social, be sure you’re engaging in a timely, human way with your customers and followers, and be doubly sure all transaction processes are set up to run smoothly.

STUDY: Interacting With Other Brands Makes Consumers More Loyal [from PR Newser; written by Patrick Coffee]

“Here’s what we take from these findings: brands shouldn’t be afraid of competitors targeting their most loyal consumers. In fact, they might even want to encourage it. In many cases, trying something different just reminds you why you prefer your favorites.”

And finally, a bonus roundup of some posts on social media myths:

Busting The Myths of Social Media and Content Marketing [Geekless Tech] 

6 Social Media Marketing Myths To Avoid [Business2Community]

Written by Sarah

February 7th, 2014 at 8:42 am

The Week in Social Analytics #86

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

2014 Edelman Trust Barometer [from Edelman]

“The technology industry continues to lead as the most trusted sector.”

3 Scientific Studies With Real Insight Into Social Media [from Convince and Convert; written by Pratik Dholakiya]

“As marketers, we can’t always wait for the data to catch up to our hunches, but we are foolish if we ignore it once it arrives, and the data is telling a fairly consistent story. Audience retention and interaction are key: reach is secondary.” (Emphasis original.)

If you read one piece today, make it this one.

Instagram Is The Fastest-Growing Social Site Globally, Mobile Devices Rule Over PCs For Access [from TechCrunch; written by Ingrid Lunden]

“According to research published today by the GlobalWebIndex, Instagram is growing the fastest of all social media sites worldwide, increasing its active user base by 23% in the last six months.”

8 Ways to Stand Out on Instagram [from Social Media Today; written by Stephanie Clegg]

“Your images are the most important thing on Instagram. You want to make sure they fit in with the feel and vibe of your brand but more importantly they have to fit in with the vibe of the Instagram community. Instagram is a thriving community and like on any social network, if you want to survive and succeed you are going to have to play by their rules.”

How Social Media Influences Purchase Decisions – Statistics And Trends | Infographic [from Invesp Blog; written by Khalid Saleh]

“4 in 10 Social Media users have purchased an item online or in-store after sharing it or marking it as a Favorite on Twitter, Facebook or Pinterest. 71% of consumers are more likely to make a purchase based on social media referrals.”

How SM Influences Purchase Decisions

Click through for full infographic.

The Rise of Visual Storytelling [from B2B Marketing Insider; written by Michael Brenner]

“All this available information and data is creating a battle for customer attention between brands, publishers, and each one of us who creates content. But more importantly, it’s forcing businesses to think and act like publishers.”

The answer to gaining some of this precious attention? Visual content.

Is Tumblr Right for my Business? [from Intuit Small Business Blog; written by Brenda Barron]

“Just because you don’t offer a visual product doesn’t mean you should avoid Tumblr. Your use of the site just might not be as intuitive at first.

In lieu of posting product photos, consider posting photos related to your products. For instance, eyeglass maker Warby Parker doesn’t merely offer photos of its high-end frames. . .The company promotes a lifestyle — what people who wear its glasses do — and sells indirectly by posting compelling content that goes beyond its products.”

And here’s a bonus video to check out from this week’s Digital-Life-Design conference: A conversation on creativity and tech, featuring David Karp, Georg Petschnigg, and Felix Salmon [DLD14 - On Creating Tech]

Written by Sarah

January 24th, 2014 at 9:33 am

Pump your fitness up with social media support

with one comment

Social networks evolved out of a desire to connect and share in a new way with people already in our lives, then further evolved as a way to reach out to new people we want to add to our lives, sometimes both online and off. Using these networks to seek out those with similar goals and struggles for both accountability and support is a natural extension of this; finding advice, commiseration, or just about anything else having to do with health and fitness is now just a couple of clicks away.

Every social network is what you make of it, and we wanted to take a look at how people are using them for support networks.

Using Twitter to support fitness endeavors 

January is the month we all promise ourselves we’re going to get back into shape after an extensive treat-yourself-holiday-season, but most of us don’t follow through even though support is just a tweet or post away. In fact, one study showed that Twitter helped participants lose more weight. Fitness bloggers create Twitter lists of other fitness-centric accounts to follow, and join in fitness tweet chats like #FitBlog and #FitStudio.

And what about other social media?

Communities of fitness enthusiasts exist on every platform. On Tumblr and Instagram you can find like-minded fitness folks to follow, particularly through exploring hashtags related to fitness. Fitness-focused Pinterest boards cover everything from suggested workouts of the day to healthy meal recipes, desired fitness equipment, and more.

One of the most popular fitness-related tags on any site is #fitspo, meaning fitness inspiration. A quick search on Instagram alone shows over 6 million #fitspo-tagged photos, and we’ve looked at the size of the Tumblr fitness community- or “fitblr”- before as well. While the basic premise behind fitspo is to stay motivated by sharing inspiring photos of fit models, athletes, or regular people (along with meals, progress, inspirational/motivational phrases, and more), the practice has come under fire for focusing more on the aesthetics of the bodies being shown rather than the physical work and accomplishments of the people to whom the bodies belong.

A social media counter-culture has arisen to combat this, however. For example, Tumblr user The Exercist works to combat problematic fitspo by using a tag the blog invented- #reclaimingfitspo- and encouraging other Tumblr users to post photos that show athletes or other people in action and relating their accomplishments below. The Exercist also writes posts to combat harmful or dangerous fitness myths, shares sources so readers can find more information, and points out when popular fitspo images have been Photoshopped.

On Instagram, many fitspo posters will share photos with those who belong to the same gym or running group as them with the tag #fitfam, meaning “fitness family”. This brings real world support in the form of workout buddies to social media; your fitfam might now include people who are several states or even countries away, offering an extra dose of support. Other tags often used for fitness include: #MondayMotivation, #TuesdayTransformation, #WednesdayWorkout, #Fitness, and #FitnessAddict.

As for social platforms that solely focus on fitness, there are options like Fitocracy (which has both a site and an app), MyFitnessPal, or the new Instagram-compatible app FitSnap that adds workout stats to your photos you can then share on Instagram or elsewhere. Wearables with social aspects are also hitting the market: Fitbit, Nike+ FuelBand, Jawbone Up, and a host of others. You can even put your money where your mouth is with GymPact and earn cash for your workouts– or pay out when you don’t.  CNN covered a whole range of fitness devices and apps in an article last summer, along with discussing the psychological motivation that comes from social fitness shares.

If it’s accountability you’re looking for in your fitness journey, you no longer have to look much further than the device screen nearest you.

Written by Sarah

January 23rd, 2014 at 8:40 am

Posted in Trends

Tagged with , ,

The Week in Social Analytics #85

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

More than Half of Social Media Ads Spending Will Go to Native In-stream Ads [from Social Media Today; written by Aaron Elliott]

“A study conducted by BI Intelligence shows that among all social media sites, the ones that will find natural ads most valuable are the ones that focus on photo sharing, like Pinterest, Snapchat and Instagram.”

6 Tips for Instagram Marketing Mastery [from Jeff Bullas]

“What might be the biggest hurdle for the more business-minded individual is the understanding that Instagram is not just about selling.  In fact, using your account as a megaphone to promote your product or service is a surefire way to lose followers and leave you feeling like you are shouting into a deserted room.”

Brand Journalism: Breathe New Life into Old Content [from Spin Sucks; written by Gini Dietrich]

Relevant to this past Monday’s #MMchat; a fantastic resource for digital marketers or anyone interested in marketing and social media

How to Mobilize Your Brand Advocates through Storytelling [from Mack Collier]

“The most powerful thing about organic advocacy is the story behind customer’s experience. And because the endorsement is not paid for by the brand, and the story is something others can truly connect with, it becomes a great motivator in getting others to act on the endorsement. Advocacy, done right, becomes true influence. And influence is what impacts behaviors.” 

Emphasis original.

Update from the FDA on Social Media Guidance [from Common Sense; written by Aaron Strout]

“It’s been a long time coming, but it looks like the FDA is getting around to providing guidance to the healthcare industry around social media. Granted that realtime online conversations and the heavily regulated drug industry aren’t the most obvious of bedfellows, but it’s a reality and it’s here to stay.”

Cool or Uncool? Consumers Weigh in on Social Media Behavior [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Brands ought to be wary of overstepping boundaries: two-thirds of respondents feel that a brand’s use of their content on its social media site without permission is ‘uncool.’ Also uncool? Brands calling with automated personalized messages, according to 57% of respondents.”

The Few, The Fervent: Fans Of ‘Supernatural’ Redefine TV Success [from NPR; written by Neda Ulaby]

“‘Nielsen has done a lot of research as to whether social media is helping people to tune in to TV,’ he says, noting that a show’s traction on Twitter and Tumblr is starting to affect how networks pitch shows to the all-important advertisers. ‘They’re no longer just including Nielsen ratings. They’re also including social TV data.’”

HBO Hedges on Social Media to Reach ‘Challenging’ Demographic [from Entrepreneur; written by Geoff Weiss]

“The HBO smash Girls, for instance, is making a full-court press in the digital sphere to hype its third season, which premiered last night. The network is prioritizing micro video apps like Snapchat and Vine over traditional advertising formats to galvanize its sizable digital audience.”

Written by Sarah

January 17th, 2014 at 7:32 am

The Week in Social Analytics #83

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Five Social Media Measurement Questions I Hope (NOT) To See in 2014 [from Metrics Man; written by Don Bartholomew]

“‘I don’t measure ‘social media’, I measure what you are trying to accomplish with social media’. . .the distinction is very important. Measurement is fundamentally about performance against objectives. So, we measure our performance against the objectives established in the social media plan. A lot of what passes for measurement in social media is really data collection – tracking Followers or Likes, blog traffic or consumer engagement on Facebook. Unless you have measurable objectives and targets in each of these areas, you are collecting data not measuring. What do you want to happen as a result of your social media campaign or initiative? Measure that.”

Social Media Update 2013 [from Pew Internet; written by Maeve Duggan & Aaron Smith]

“Some 73% of online adults now use a social networking site of some kind. Facebook is the dominant social networking platform in the number of users, but a striking number of users are now diversifying onto other platforms. Some 42% of online adults now use multiple social networking sites. In addition, Instagram users are nearly as likely as Facebook users to check in to the site on a daily basis.”

3 Social Media Trends You Should Know About [from Mashable; written by Alex Honeysett]

“If you haven’t mastered Vine or Instagram’s video feature yet, now is the time to get comfortable. If the prediction is correct, making compelling short videos will be as important as writing in 140 characters. The earlier you can master the trend, the better.”

2014 Marketing Measurement Predictions [from Social Media Explorer; written by Nichole Kelly]

“This is a fundamental shift in how we’ve thought about measuring marketing for decades. It’s not about the campaign, it’s not about the channel, it’s not about the content, it’s about how all of those efforts combined to create revenue.”

Anatomy of a Tumblr [from Medium; written by Daniel Dalton]

“8 Tips for making a successful Tumblr:

1. Do one thing. Do it well. Be consistent. Find your niche and own it.
2. Think different. There are millions of blogs. Find a way to be unique.
3. Make it visual. 60% of shares on Tumblr are images. Show, don’t tell.
4. Get good help. If you can’t write or design, find someone who can.
5. Be a part of the community. Ask for suggestions, take requests. Listen.
6. Fail hard. This isn’t my first dance at the Tumblr party. It’s trial & error.
7. Be excellent to each other. Seriously. This.
8. Tumblr. Because Tumblr.”

Emphasis original.

A Nice Collection of B2B Marketing Stats and Videos [from Paul Gillin]

“Here’s its latest collection of recent trends and statistics: This is the year that was in B2B Marketing crunched. Be sure to check out the links to some of the year’s best B2B videos on slide 37.”

Written by Sarah

January 3rd, 2014 at 10:12 am

The Week in Social Analytics #82

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

11 News Sources Using Instagram Video [from Mashable; written by Rebecca Hiscott]

“Just as Twitter heralded a brave new world for bite-size storytelling, Instagram Video now challenges digital innovators — and traditional news outlets — to use the platform to its full potential, packing 15-second video segments with vital information and titillating tidbits.”

Not a bad way to get some inspiring ideas for your own short video content.

Women Up Time Spent on Social Platforms [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“But it’s platforms like Pinterest and Instagram that are garnering an ever-greater share of time from those women who do use them. Nearly half of women surveyed who visited social networks regularly said they had increased the amount of time they spent on Pinterest or blogging platforms in the past year—and more than two-thirds said the same of Instagram. A comparatively small 30% said they were using Facebook more frequently.”

How to generate sales with social media in an underground business [from Web Ink Now; written by David Meerman Scott]

“Social media is everything for us,” Liza says. “It enables us to spread the word.”

3 Metrics to Measure Year-End Social Media Results [from Business 2 Community; written by Maria Peagler]

“I’m a huge advocate of the 80/20 rule: 20% of your effort generates 80% of your business.

So we’ll be measuring the top 20% of your promotional tactics to see what drove the most results.“ 

Social Media Year in Review: 13 Must-Know Statistics from 2013 (Infographic) [from Entrepreneur; written by Brian Honigman]

“With the multitude of social channels on the market and the growing need to create content at scale to fuel these networks, it’s important to have actionable data to help better focus your social media-marketing efforts. Take these 13 fascinating social-media statistics about SlideShare, Snapchat, Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter, Vine, LinkedIn and Google+ into mind when formulating your marketing strategy for 2014:”

2013 SM stats Infographic
Click through for the full infographic from Sparefoot, or see it directly on their site.

The Ultimate Social Media Tip Sheet [from Heidi Cohen]

101 tactics from Heidi Cohen’s top 5 articles.

2014 Will Be the Year to Lead With Analytics [from Social Media Today; written by Michael Brito]

“This is more than a prediction. It’s a fact.  Marketers need to make smarter decisions moving into 2014; and they can only do so by looking at data.”

Five Ways to Win Trust [from Social Media Examiner; written by Tracey Parsons]

“About 86% of people make an active effort to hide their digital footprint. The #1 reason is hackers. . .But #2 was marketers.”

The Best Social Media Campaigns Of The Recent Past [from Soshable; written by Anita Reid]

“Today’s companies and organizations use the campaigns that integrate their offline marketing with social media channels, their own site and paid advertising.”

Check out some of the most recent clever and integrated campaigns to get inspired for 2014.

Written by Sarah

December 27th, 2013 at 7:58 am

The 10 Best Travel Resources on Social Media and Beyond

without comments

Image courtesy NYPL.

Friday was expected to be the biggest travel day of the year, but a lot of you are still headed home for the holidays and maybe still scrambling to book last minute New Year’s plans. Whether it’s something fairly local, or that big trip abroad you’ve always wanted to take that you’re finally booking as a New Year’s resolution, we’ve got some tips and resources to help make traveling easier on you:

  1. Your network: Get information about experiences from those who have been there that you trust by talking to your network on Twitter, Tumblr, and more to see what you should splurge on, what you should skip, and what to expect in different cities and countries. A Twitter friend might even offer to show you around, or point you to someone who can help with local recommendations. (Want to grow that network? Check out our list of Twitter travel resources.)

  2. Check out the social accounts of locals: Headed to Paris, or Perth? Check out the accounts of some locals to get an idea of the kinds of non-touristy activities and places to eat and drink around around your destination. Strike up a conversation and ask questions if they seem open to it; a lot of people love to share hidden gems of their own town so visitors enjoy themselves.

  3. Connect with companies: Is the place you’re staying on Instagram? Is the rental company you’re getting a car from on Twitter? Does the airline you’re flying on have a Tumblr? Get familiar with their services through these channels– and you might even stumble onto a social-media-only deal or two!

  4. Utilize Pinterest for Planning: Start a Pinterest board for ideas for your trip: sites you want to see, things you don’t want to forget to pack, places you want to eat. Search the site to see if anyone has made such a board already, and you might pick up some unexpected and handy tips. Same goes for boards from locals; their fashion board might tell you more about what to pack than any weather report could.

  5. Catalog: Instagram is a great way to share snapshots of your trip as you’re on it. Limit yourself to one to two photos a day so you’ve got a little something to let friends and family know what you’re up to without distracting yourself from enjoying the moment.

  6. Save some pennies: Couchsurfing and Airbnb have both become popular alternatives to hotels. Couchsurfing in particular is a free service, where hosts give travelers a place to stay out of the kindness of their hearts in the spirit of travel. Airbnb lets you choose from a variety of accommodation options that give you a more local feel than a hotel. If you decide to use either service, be sure you check out the reviews of the host and/or space to make sure you know what you’re getting into

  7. YouTube Travel Channels: If you like your travel advice in video form with the possibility of inappropriate jokes, then YouTube travel channels are just for you. The channel Maila AuParis has a series on CouchSurfing in addition to a lot of other travel videos. The Expert Vagabond and Mashable both have roundups of YouTube travel channels to inspire, instruct, and more. And don’t forget about the big guys: Lonely Planet and The Travel Channel both have YouTube channels of their own.

  8. Traveling with pets: BlogPaws has a travel category with safety tips and more for traveling with pets. Keep track of pet-friendly hotels at PetsWelcome, and be sure to check the TSA guidelines for flying with pets if that’s in your plan. You’ll want to see specifically what your airline says about traveling with pets as well.

  9. Traveling with children: Last year the New York Times covered innovative travel products to ease the burden of packing for and hauling around quick-to-tire small children.  The CDC has health and safety tips while the TSA goes over what is expected of your child in airline security lines. If you’re sending a minor unaccompanied on a flight, check with your particular airline to see what the procedures and expectations are.

  10. Apps to check out: CNN has a whole category on their site covering travel apps of all descriptions. If you’re a lover of travel guides, check to see if they offer apps to go along with them. That way you’ll have information on the ground without carrying around the guide itself, and many also have a social component. Also consider downloading a few language apps if you’re traveling to a foreign country, so you can practice common words and phrases.

Got any tips we missed? Leave ‘em in the comments, or tell us about them on Twitter. Safe travels, and happy holidays!

Written by Sarah

December 23rd, 2013 at 7:45 am

Posted in Guides

Tagged with , ,

The Week in Social Analytics #81

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Social Media Image Dimensions: The Ultimate Guide [from Pamorama; written by Pam Dyer]

“Brands experience almost 50% more audience engagement when sharing an image or video on their social media platforms, which is why social networks are increasingly featuring and promoting visual content. Optimizing your visual space online is key to achieving maximum exposure for your name and your brand, and helps build your fan base.”

Time to Grow Up! Social businesses mature, yet many still lack a strategic foundation | Infographic [from Brian Solis]

“The number one thing we learned this year is that no matter how much we celebrate the case studies and best practices of the most social brands, they are far from perfect. You can replicate campaigns but you can’t replicate how the efforts of others cultivate ideal experiences and relationships with your customers…in a meaningful way.”

5 Biggest Social Media Lessons of 2013 [from Mashable; written by Katy Finneran]

“Witnessing a single tweet swing the pendulum of markets proved that social media is every bit as valuable to day traders as it is to newsmakers.”

Lessons on everything from social’s influence on markets, to its increasingly visual nature, the growth and evolution of social media advertising, and the continued rise of social TV.

How a single Tumblr post turned this unknown book into a bestseller [from The Daily Dot; written by Aja Romano]

“But anyone who dismisses the value of Tumblr as a promotional and marketing tool might want to ask author Cory O’Brien what he thinks. When Tumblr discovered his book, Zeus Grants Stupid Wishes, the community turned  it into a viral sensation and overnight bestseller.”

Social Media Engagement: The Surprising Facts About How Much Time People Spend On The Major Social Networks [from Business Insider; written by Emily Adler]

Social is now the top Internet activity: Americans spend an average of 37 minutes daily on social media, a higher time-spend than any other major Internet activity, including email.”

Second screen study shows 72% of viewers engaging with a show’s social media are encouraged to watch again [from Social Media Influence; written by staff]

“According to the study:

  • 40% of respondents have engaged with a TV shows second screen app.
  • 72% of those engaging with a TV show’s social media page or app say doing so encourages to watch the show again.
  • 62% of respondents say they use social media ‘sometimes’ or ‘always’ while watching TV.”

2 in 3 Millennials Share Social Experiences Online [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Shared web experiences have implications for how Millennials process information and trust its sources, and the researchers also note that many Millennials are establishing global networks online that make it more complex for marketers to create messages that vary significantly from one country to the next.”

The Facts and Figures on the Power of Visual Content Marketing [from Jeff Bullas]

“Competitors have emerged driven by the social web and includes Instagram, Pinterest and Vine. If we look at the global impact of these we get some rather staggering numbers.

  • Pinterest debuted in May 2011
  • Pinterest saw a growth of 1047% in unique visitors from 2011 to 2012
  • Instagram started in 2010
  • Instagram has 130 million users
  • Instagram photos have 1 billion likes a day
  • More than 16 billion photos are hosted through the service.”

Click through for more stats plus an infographic.

Six Ways Brands Can Use Instagram Direct For Marketing [from Business 2 Community; written by Nicole Rose Dion]

“Not only is this a great feature for individuals, Instagram Direct has the potential to be especially useful for brands. It allows brands the chance to provide sneak peeks to loyal followers, send coupons and encourage e-commerce.”

Instagram Says First Ad Results Are “Promising” With Recall Up 32%, Shows It Wants TV Brand Dollars [from Tech Crunch; written by Josh Constine]

“Brands saw average ad recall up 3X while brand message awareness was up 10% across four campaigns, with Levi’s reaching 7.4 million US 18-34 year olds in 9 days while Ben & Jerry’s reached 9.8 million US 18-35 year olds in 8 days.”

Written by Sarah

December 20th, 2013 at 9:34 am

The Week in Social Analytics #80

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

More Than 70% Of Under 35s Research, Post And Talk About Brands On Social Media | Study [from All Twitter; written by Shea Bennett]

“More than seven out of ten millennials (internet users aged between 15 and 34, aka Generation Y) consult, react to or post about products and brands on social media, with almost two-thirds saying that positive – and negative – experiences shared by others impact their purchase decisions.”

Click through for full infographic.

Digital Marketing And Analytics: Two Ladders For Magnificent Success [from Occam's Razor; written by Avinash Kaushik]

“The world’s greatest social media strategy: 1. Entertain Me 2. Inform Me. 3. Provide Utility. Nothing else works.”

12 Tips for Holiday Instagram Marketing: Last-Minute Instagram Tips [from Social Media Today; written by Krista Bunskoek]

Tip 5: Cross-promote Contests with Videos. Pair with B2B Marketers Use Stories for Successful Digital Video, from eMarketer:

“B2B marketers are investing in video marketing because, like most internet users, B2B clients and prospects are devoting more time to watching digital video. Businesspeople are drawn to B2B video for pretty much the same reason consumers watch video—it’s entertaining.”

The 5 Best Instagram Ads [from Social Media Today; written by Alan Cassinelli]

Ben & Jerry’s: so good, they made the list twice.

5 Content Marketing Lessons from 2013′s Most Popular Tumblr Blogs [from Carrot & Stick; written by Kyle Psaty]

“If the content you share doesn’t challenge the expectations of your market, then you’re not differentiating yourself; you’re simply marketing your industry.”

What Made 2013′s Top Tumblr Ad Successful? [from Mobile Marketing Magazine; written by Alex Spencer]

You might be tempted to say the answer is “GIFs” but the deeper answer is understanding the platform.

Top 10 Influential Social Media Marketing Campaigns Of 2013 [from Business 2 Community; written by Eunice David]

‘Tis the season for roundups– what were your picks for 2013?

Instagram the 10th-Largest US Smartphone App by Reach [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Granted, the figures are for adult iOS and Android users only – but those 2 platforms combined represent more than 90% of the smartphone market. And when it comes to Instagram’s position, including the younger audience would probably boost its reach figure, given its young user base.”

Are Efforts to Recruit Women in Technology Sexist? [from Dame Magazine; written by Lisa Wirthman]

“Ultimately, Verou and Horvath share a similar sentiment. Says the latter, ‘I don’t just want to hire more badass women—I’m focused on keeping them.’”

Dame Steve Shirley, the World’s First Freelance Programmer [from Brain Pickings; written by Maria Popova]

“Steve Shirley went on to become the world’s first freelance programmer and founded the software company F.I. Group in 1962, one of the UK’s earliest startups. It was a revolutionary company, writing software only — an outrageous proposition at the time. It was managed and operated by highly skilled female engineers (‘We hired men. If they were good enough.’), who worked from home — also unthinkable amidst the era’s gender biases and social norms. And yet they forged forward, forever changing the course of entrepreneurship and women in technology. When F.I. was eventually floated on the London Stock Exchange in 1996, it earned hundred of millions of pounds.”

CODE2040′S Latest Mission: Make Tech Internships More Accessible to All [from Fast Company; written by Liam Matthews]

“The nonprofit places promising black and Latino STEM students at summer internships with companies including Facebook, Etsy, and Jawbone, among others. While the program has had success with the interns it’s placed–90% of last summer’s fellows received full-time job offers–one challenge has been that the interview skills of potential fellows didn’t match their technical abilities.”

Written by Sarah

December 13th, 2013 at 10:42 am