TweetReach Blog

Archive for the ‘snapshot reports’ tag

Join us for a TweetReach Pro demo TODAY at 9am PDT!

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Join us for a short demo this Thursday, May 1st- that’s today!- at 9:00am PDT and we’ll walk you through TweetReach Pro, our historical analytics and our snapshot reports.

Demos usually take 15-20 minutes followed by an open Q&A session. At the end, attendees will receive a discount code that can be applied to a TweetReach Pro subscription.

You can register here. Hope you can make it!

Written by Sarah

May 1st, 2014 at 6:16 am

How the new Twitter API updates will impact TweetReach reports

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As you may know, Twitter is making some updates to their API and we’ve been working to incorporate those changes across TweetReach. We will be rolling out these changes to our snapshot reports on March 4. Most of the API changes won’t be visible to you, but a few of these changes will affect our reports, so we wanted to make sure you knew exactly what was going on.

Adding Twitter authentication

You will now need to authenticate with a Twitter account to run snapshot reports on TweetReach. This will be the same simple “Sign in with Twitter” process you’re used to on many other websites. These changes will allow us to run new kinds of analyses, so look for those in the coming months.

This authentication will apply to free and paid reports, as well as snapshots in TweetReach Pro. If you have an account with us – whether it’s a free account or a Pro subscription – you can save your Twitter info so you only have to sign in once. If you prefer not to create an account with us, that’s fine, too, but you may need to authenticate with Twitter each time. If you would like to create a free TweetReach account to save your Twitter credentials and your TweetReach reports, you can do that here.

We’re only asking for read-only permission to your Twitter account, so we will never post anything from or on behalf of your account. We will not be able to see your DMs or your password. We will only be able to:

  • Read Tweets from your timeline
  • See who you follow

There’s more about third-party authentication on Twitter’s help center, which we encourage you to read if you have any questions about how this process works and what it allows. We’re also happy to answer any questions or address any concerns you have, so please let us know.

Replacing exposure graph

We’re updating the exposure bar graph to now reflect the follower counts for all tweets in your report. With the new graph, you’ll be able to see how many tweets were sent from accounts with a certain number of followers. The x-axis shows follower tiers (0-99; 100-999; 1,000-9,999; 10,000-99,999; 100,000 or more), and the y-axis shows the number of tweets in each follower tier. For example, want to know how many tweets in your report were sent from accounts with more than 100,000 followers? This new graph will make that quick and easy.

New exposure graph shows how many tweets were sent from users with how many followers

Handling native retweets

In addition, we’ll be handling native retweets differently from now on. Twitter’s Search API no longer includes native RTs, and this change impacts all tools built on the Search API, which includes our free and full snapshot reports. All snapshot reports will now include a slightly limited set of native retweets. Full reports will include up to 100 native RTs for each of the 15 most important tweets in a report, and our free (50-tweet) reports will include up to 100 native RTs for each of the five most important tweets in a report. This change does not impact manual, copy/paste type retweets or modified retweets. For most of you, this will provide more than enough coverage to include all retweets, since it’s quite rare to see a tweet with more than 100 retweets. There’s more on our helpdesk, including our full-fidelity options for comprehensive analytics with no limits.

Changes to our reach metric

We’re also updating our reach algorithm, which we’ve already blogged about you can read all about here. Our new reach algorithm is based on a rigorous statistical model built on years of Twitter data. We’re very happy about this change, because it means reach will be faster and less resource-intensive to calculate.

So, to sum it up…

We’re really excited about these changes! Reach is so much smarter than it was before, and using Twitter authentication means we’ll be able to build new kinds of analyses, so there’s lots more coming in the future. We also know this is a lot to take in, so if you have any questions about any of these changes, please let us know.

Written by Jenn D

March 3rd, 2013 at 2:54 pm

Posted in News

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