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TweetReach Tip: Find & engage influencers on Twitter with TweetReach snapshot reports

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You can do a lot with your TweetReach snapshot reports and Trackers, and one of the most important and often underutilized tricks is identifying and then interacting with your biggest influencers on Twitter. How? It’s pretty simple:

  1. Run a TweetReach snapshot report
  2. Check out your contributors

That’s it. It’s that easy! Here are some screenshots from a report we ran about Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield:

Top contributors shows you the top Twitter accounts talking about Col. Hadfield. @Gizmodo earned the highest number of impressions from their tweets about the astronaut, @NewsBreaker garnered the most retweets, and @csa_asc (the Canadian Space Agency) generated the most mentions. (You can find a breakdown of a snapshot report here if you need one.)

What do these numbers mean? Exposure is the total number of times a tweet is delivered to Twitter streams, or the overall number of impressions generated. A high exposure means that account has a lot of followers, and tweets from that account were delivered to lots of other Twitter accounts. NewsBreakers got the most retweets, meaning many of that account’s followers found the Hadfield-centered tweet interesting enough to pass along to their followers. Finally, the Canadian Space Agency Twitter handle was mentioned in the most tweets about Col. Hadfield.

If you run regular snapshot reports and notice that you have repeat top contributors, those are definitely accounts you want to engage with,  if you aren’t already doing so. And remember, you can save your TweetReach reports if you create a free account, or download PDFs or CSVs for later reference.


Don’t just limit yourself to your top contributors either; be sure to look at the full list of contributors. Paying attention to everyone who is talking about you or your brand will let you see who is retweeting your content and generating impressions. These people might not be able to generate as many impressions as an account like Gizmodo because they have fewer followers, but having lots of followers isn’t necessarily as important as being able to influence others. Not everyone following Gizmodo will be interested in everything they retweet or talk about, but someone with a lot of pull with his or her followers – even if there are only 200 – may actually have more followers paying attention, possibly even clicking through and reading a link, or ultimately purchasing something. If that kind of person is consistently in your contributors list, you should be engaging with him or her.

How do you engage? Follow these accounts and talk to them when it’s natural. Do they take part in Twitter chats? If it’s relevant, join in. This will lead you to more likeminded people to connect with. Do they share interesting content? Retweet or reply to it; start a conversation.

On a related note, looking closely at contributors is also a great way to connect with those who are influential in your industry, or about the topic you’re tracking. Then later, if you want to join into that conversation, you know who to talk to.

So that’s how to do this with a snapshot report. How’s it different with a Tracker? We’ll cover that in our next post. Stay tuned, and as always, comment with any questions!

Written by Sarah

March 28th, 2013 at 1:03 pm

The AP sells sponsored tweets to Samsung during CES

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And we took a look at one of them. This week, the Associated Press decided to sell sponsored tweets during the annual CES tech trade show on its @AP Twitter account. A lot of blogs and news outlets discussed the ads, but actual engagement with the sponsored tweets was quite low. Here’s one of the tweets in question:

This sponsored tweet from Samsung got a total of – wait for it – 15 retweets. The activity leveled off rather quickly; 12 of the 15 retweets happened immediately, followed by two in the next hour, and the final straggler the following morning. Then nothing else. There wasn’t very much lasting traction to this tweet, as seen below:

The tweet did generate a total reach of 1,584,824 unique Twitter accounts, but that’s really not much more than the 1,538,203 followers the @AP account itself had at the time of the tweet. A quick look at the top contributors might account for the reason: @AP was the top contributor, followed by @HuffPostMedia and a Japanese Global Media Studies Professor. It would make sense for multiple accounts to follow most or all three of these contributors, as they’re all journalism-related accounts, but it didn’t result in much additional spread of the original ad.

The reach for everyone talking about AP’s sponsored tweets was much higher, with nearly 550 tweets from more than 500 contributors in the past few days, reaching 4.3 million different Twitter accounts. The activity, however, still dropped off rather quickly:


Everyone is talking about the AP selling their tweets (or they were), but the interaction with the sponsored tweets themselves remained low. The three sponsored tweets were only retweeted 21, 15 and 14 times respectively. There were far tweets with more opinions on the subject than actual RTs: opinions tacked onto RTs of articles about it, occasionally added in front of an AP retweet, or sent out and tagged with the AP’s handle. Some, however, went for a more direct route.

Replies to AP about their sponsored tweets were not terribly positive:

They were about as snarky as some of the news and blog coverage was. But why?


Perhaps because people think that as a news source, the AP should remain neutral, and maybe particularly on Twitter, a platform that is poised to become the go-to place for breaking news even more than it already is for its heavy users.

Looking at the data on the entire discussion around AP sponsored tweets seems to back up that idea. Here are a few examples:



The opinion that a major, historically trusted news source should remain neutral might explain why people are upset over the AP selling sponsored tweets, but haven’t been in the past when celebrities have done the same thing (there’s even a company set up exclusively for celebrities or other popular Twitter personalities that want to endorse products on Twitter). Celebrities are expected to supplement their income with product endorsements, and are not followed or revered for their journalistic integrity.

Sponsored tweets aren’t anything new – Mashable wrote an article saying just that back in 2009 – so the amount of attention and news being generated by the AP selling tweets has been puzzling to some. Others, whether or not they’ve paid much attention to it before, simply see it as an expected form of native advertising. Different from the Promoted Tweets that Twitter launched in April of 2010, sponsored tweets are a deal between a vendor and a celebrity or other well-known figure with a large Twitter following, with Twitter getting nothing out of the deal, except perhaps to say that advertising works on its platform.

Former member of The Pussycat Dolls Nicole Scherzinger and a sponsored tweet for Herbal Essences… A little different than the AP and Samsung, or so response would seem to indicate.

Let us know what you think in the comments.

Written by Sarah

January 10th, 2013 at 11:04 am

Which TweetReach product should I use?

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We know you’ve got different needs and different budgets, even on different days. That’s why we offer a range of TweetReach products to help you get the best return on your Twitter investment– and we’re here to help you figure out which tool to use.

We have three main products at TweetReach: our snapshot reports, Pro Trackers, and historical analytics.

A Tracker is best when:

Your topic is going to pull in a lot of tweets.
If you’re running a conference or other major event or tracking any large or popular topic where you’re anticipating a large volume of tweets to be generated, set up a Tracker beforehand to be sure you don’t miss any tweets. Snapshot reports are limited to 1500 tweets, but Trackers don’t have those limits and will capture all the tweets about your topic or event.

The best part? All tweets collected by a Tracker are archived for as long as you have a TweetReach Pro subscription, so you can drill into your data to find out how customers are interacting with your brand and/or campaign over the entire time you’ve been tracking. This is a great way to discover brand advocates, industry influencers, and see trends develop over time.

You want to track what everyone is saying during your campaign or event.
This is what Trackers were made for; with Trackers you can monitor and analyze unlimited tweets in real time, as the tweets are posted to Twitter. Each Tracker allows you to monitor up to 15 queries about your topic, which can include hashtags, a key industry phrase, and more. This will allow you to keep track of who is saying what about your event – enabling you to handle any issues as they emerge – and gives you a wealth of data to study later. You’ll be able to recognize key contributors and influencers, and plan better for your next big event. With a Tracker set up you won’t have to worry about pulling reports at different intervals to get the information you need. It will be automatically collected for you, just waiting to be analyzed.

Keep in mind that Trackers are only available through a TweetReach Pro subscription.

Historical analytics are best when:

You want to compare a current campaign to one you ran last year, or a few years ago.
With the addition of our premium historical analytics, you can now compare current campaigns to those of the past (your own or your competitors’). For the first time we have the ability to reach all the way back to tweets posted at the very beginning of Twitter in March of 2006.

Twitter isn’t just about real-time anymore: now the entirety of Twitter history is available to be analyzed and studied.

You want to research past tweets.
Research the after effects of Twitter emergencies, PR disasters, recurring events (conferences, holidays, etc), past feelings around a certain event or topic compared to now– and more. You can research how a past event or campaigned performed even if you didn’t have real-time tracking setup then. You can compare year-over-year campaign performance before you plan your next big campaign. Having that kind of information to back up the ideas you pitch to your company or client is huge, and TweetReach historical analytics makes it possible.

We’ve recently launched our historical analytics product, and we’re incredibly excited about its implications.

Want to travel back in Twitter time with historical analytics? Read more details and get a quote.

A snapshot report is best when:

You need something fast, and free.
We understand that not every marketing team has a large budget for analytics, and not every business has a marketing team in the first place. For this reason, we offer a free snapshot report that gives you an idea of the reach of your hashtag, account, tweet or any other keyword-based topic.

Hint: you can archive (with a free TweetReach account), or print and save these reports to keep a simple record of how your company or campaign is doing on Twitter. And it costs you nothing.


You want a general idea of how tweets are spreading right now.
Search for any current hashtag, username, key phrase from a tweet, or any keyword, and our snapshot report will measure the extent of your reach, exposure, the most popular tweets, and the biggest contributors to your topic. We have two versions of our snapshot report: the quick snapshot report is free, and will include up to 50 tweets. Want more? A full snapshot report is available to anyone- no subscription or account required- and includes up to 1500 tweets for just $20. With a TweetReach Pro subscription you’ll have access to bundles of free and full snapshot reports.

Keep in mind these only provide a snapshot of recent tweets. If you want to look at what was happening yesterday or a year ago, you need our premium Historical Analytics, which are available separately.

Got any questions we missed?

Check out our help forums or drop us a line. We’re here to help!

Written by Sarah

December 12th, 2012 at 12:49 pm