TweetReach Blog

Archive for the ‘snapshot report’ tag

Happy 5th birthday, TweetReach!

without comments

They grow up so fast, don’t they? We can’t believe the TweetReach snapshot report is five years old already! We sold our very first snapshot report five years ago today, on April 3, 2009. Since then, we’ve run 6.5 million snapshot reports analyzing more than 251 million tweets.

This is what our early TweetReach Twitter analytics reports used to look like, in the spirit of Throwback Thursday. How far we’ve come!

TweetReach Snapshot Report circa 2010

TweetReach has grown so much in the past five years, and we want to thank everyone who has been a part of that journey. We wouldn’t be here without you.

And if you want to check on the reach of your tweets, you can run a snapshot report here any time (as always, the first 50 tweets are free, and up to 1500 are just $20). Here’s to the next five years, and beyond!

Written by Sarah

April 3rd, 2014 at 1:36 pm

Join us for a TweetReach Pro demo tomorrow 2/20 at 9am PST!

without comments

Join us for a short demo this Thursday, February 20 at 9:00am PST and we’ll walk you through TweetReach Pro, our historical analytics and our snapshot reports.

Demos usually take 15-20 minutes followed by an open Q&A session. At the end, attendees will receive a discount code that can be applied to a TweetReach Pro subscription.

You can register here. Hope you can make it!

Written by Sarah

February 19th, 2014 at 9:01 am

Join us for a TweetReach Pro demo tomorrow 1/16 at 11am CT!

without comments

Join us for a short demo where we’ll walk you through TweetReach Pro, our historical analytics and our snapshot reports. Demos usually take 15-20 minutes followed by an open Q&A session. At the end, attendees will receive a discount code that can be applied to a TweetReach Pro subscription.

The demo starts at 11am CT, tomorrow. You can register here.

And we promise it won’t be like this:

Written by Sarah

January 15th, 2014 at 9:25 am

TweetReach Tip: Less is more with snapshot reports

without comments

Keep it simple with TweetReach snapshot reports! Here are a few things to keep in mind when you’re running a snapshot report:

1. Snapshots will analyze tweets up to one week old. Snapshots pull tweets from up to 7 days ago, so be sure you run them as soon as you can after your event. Older tweets are only available through our premium historical analytics.

2. Full snapshots will include up to 1,500 tweets. Due to restrictions from Twitter’s Search API (more on that below), a full snapshot report is limited to about 1500 tweets from the past week. If your topic or hashtag had more tweets than that, we’ll go back until we hit that limit, but won’t be able to pull them all into a snapshot report. For higher-volume topics, try our historical analytics or ongoing Pro Trackers.

3. A snapshot report is just that – a snapshot. We use the Twitter Search API for our snapshot report data, and it operates more on relevancy than on completeness. This means it will pull everything that Twitter considers most relevant to your search query from the past seven days, so some tweets or users might be missing from your results. For more complete results, try our Pro Tracker, which has access to the full-fidelity, real-time Twitter stream.

4. Narrow your snapshot search dates with filters. If you want more specific results for a snapshot report, you can include date filters. The since: and until: operators allow you to select a specific date range within the past week for your search. For example, let’s say you want to see all #TBT tweets for December 12, 2013 through December 17, 2013. Search for #TBT since:2013-12-12 until:2013-12-18 (use the YYYY-MM-DD format, which is tied to 00:00 for each date). Like this:

#TBT Snapshot

5. Tweets in our snapshot reports are displayed in the Universal Coordinated Time zone (UTC). This is to simplify and standardize our reporting across all time zones. If you need help converting UTC to your time zone, try this converter.

Written by Sarah

January 2nd, 2014 at 9:23 am

TweetReach Tip: Saving your snapshot reports

with one comment

You don’t have to go Pro to save your TweetReach snapshot reports. As long as you’ve registered for a free TweetReach account - and you’re logged in! – you can save every report you run for future access in your My Reports archive. That applies to both free, 50-tweet snapshots, as well as full, $20 snapshots.  Just be sure to log in to your account before you run your next snapshot report.

And whenever you purchase  a full snapshot report, you’ll still receive an email copy and a receipt. If you happen to purchase a report while you were logged out, just send us an email and we’ll be happy to move it into your account.

Are you new to TweetReach or want to learn more about our products? 

First, run a free snapshot report about your Twitter account, hashtag, keywords or URL on tweetreach.com. If you have any questions about our metrics, read this.

Second, if you’d like to set up ongoing monitoring for any Twitter account or keyword-based topic, check our TweetReach Pro. Starting at just $84 per month, it’s a great and affordable way to start tracking and analyzing your tweets in real time. Contact our sales team if you have any questions at all.

 

Written by Sarah

December 3rd, 2013 at 11:56 am

TweetReach Tip: Snapshot report receipts

with one comment

If you buy one of our full snapshot reports (up to 1500 tweets, posted up to one week ago), then we’ll send you an email with your snapshot report, as well as a receipt for your purchase.

In that report email, you’ll have links to access your report and receipt online, download a PDF, export a CSV file and find our support contact information. Here’s an example of that email:

Screen Shot 2013-11-26 at 11.06.37 AM

So, when you order your report, don’t lose this email! It has your receipt and report info, in case you need it later. But if you do lose the email, call or email us and we’ll be happy to send you another copy!

 

Written by Sarah

November 26th, 2013 at 1:31 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

Tagged with ,

TweetReach Tip: Excluding tweets from your search

without comments

You can exclude certain tweets from your results by using the minus (“-”) operator in your TweetReach search. You can exclude tweets that include certain keywords or tweets that mention a certain account. For example:

 Sandwiches -ham 

or

#swag -justinbieber

The second example is a good one to use if you find a spammer or someone whose tweets you really don’t want to include in your reports.

Note that there should not be a space between the minus and the word you’re excluding.  If you’d like to exclude a two word phrase, wrap them in quotation marks, like this:

#swag -”justin bieber”

Written by Sarah

November 21st, 2013 at 9:08 am

TweetReach Tip: Searching for a specific tweet

without comments

Say you want to search for a specific tweet in a snapshot report, like this one from our Twitter timeline:

TR Tweet

Be sure to search for the text of the tweet, rather than the tweet’s unique URL. Try searching for the first part of the tweet text. Keep it short – under 60 characters – and wrap it in quotations marks in order to catch any and all retweets. Like this:

“Vanity metrics- like FB Likes- have their uses”

Written by Sarah

November 14th, 2013 at 2:29 pm

TweetReach Tip: Searching for URLs

with 2 comments

If you want to follow a piece of news through Twitter, try searching for the article’s URL instead of its title or a set of keywords. In TweetReach snapshot reports, we can search for a root URL, so even if a link is shrunk into a t.co, bit.ly or other shortener, we’ll pick it up.

Some more tips to get the results you’re looking for:

  • Exclude the http:// or www. They don’t impact your search and lengthen your search query. And depending on the URL shortener, might not even be included in the link.
  • Keep queries at about 60 characters or under. If you have a long URL, consider searching for the second half – the unique part – of the URL to save space.

Want to see an example? Say you want to follow this New York Times article Sushi’s New Vanguard and watch how it spreads through Twitter. In your TweetReach search, you can leave out the http:// and www. portions of the URL. Search just for this:

nytimes.com/2013/10/30/dining/sushis-new-vanguard.html

That will result in this snapshot report. Note how it includes tweets that use nyti.ms shortened URLs, among others.

Have any questions about your URL? Just ask us!

Written by Sarah

November 5th, 2013 at 10:50 am

How to measure a Twitter campaign with TweetReach

with one comment

You’ve planned out your Twitter campaign; you’ve strategized and you’re ready to launch. Now, how to measure the impact of those tweet? (You want solid numbers that reflect all of your hard work, after all.) You have several options with TweetReach, depending on your budget and time.

Twitter measurement doesn’t have to be a bear. [Image courtesy of the New York Public Library Digital Gallery]

Use our free snapshot reports as soon as you launch your campaign, and capture information at the end of every day. Do it ASAP to get the best info – tweets are only available for a few days. No account is required, but you can create one to save your reports- extra backups never hurt! Are you getting more participation than anticipated? Purchase a full report and capture up to 1500 tweets about your campaign. Just 20 bucks.

I want to set up everything once, not have to worry about capturing data every day.

Set up an ongoing, real-time TweetReach Pro Tracker and it will capture all your results from the beginning of your campaign to the end. And no 1500-tweet limit, so it’s great for larger conversations. Each Tracker monitors up to fifteen search queries, so you can track all iterations of your campaign hashtags (hey, people make spelling mistakes!) and keywords. You can later edit your Trackers once they’ve started, if you see participants start using their own hashtags or other keywords you also want to track.

What if I want to go back at the end and capture data for something I missed initially?

Say you notice halfway through your campaign that participants have created their own extra hashtag or started using keywords you didn’t anticipate, and you want to capture that data. Or maybe you didn’t remember to set up tracking in advance, or you just got an analytics budget. We can access any older tweets with our premium historical analytics. No matter how far back or how many tweets, we can get to anything from Twitter’s full archive, all the way back to March 2006.

Have you used TweetReach to track a campaign? How’d it go? Tell us about it in the comments!

Written by Sarah

April 30th, 2013 at 4:20 pm