TweetReach Blog

Archive for the ‘small business’ tag

The Week in Social Analytics #98

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

25 Small Business Social Media Trends You Need [from Heidi Cohen]

“Due to smaller size and lower amount of resources, these firms tend to take advantage of social media opportunities faster than their larger competitors.”

Instagram for Small Businesses: Your New Best Friend [from Social Media Today; written by Stephanie Jones]

“People love visual content, so that makes Instagram the ideal social media marketing platform for small businesses.  It’s also currently a completely free way to market your business to potentially millions.  Follow people, engage and you will have an impassioned following before you can say hashtag.”

More Tips for Avoiding and Containing Social Media Crises [from PR Newser; written by Patrick Coffee]

Social media often rewards wit and a little bit of attitude, but how can editorial standards and monitoring allow a brand to be interesting without being risky or offensive?

Wit should be reserved for brand messaging, but never for customer service. Those coming to customer service are in need of support and aren’t looking for a witty response, but a solution to their problem or an answer to their question.

It’s a much more difficult and dangerous venture to be witty or snarky with customer service when the main goal is supporting your customer.”

25 Customer Chat Tips to Reassure and Nurture Your Online Customers [from KISSMetrics; written by Kevin Gao]

“Live chat has been around for more than a decade, but only recently have companies discovered its profound effect on website conversion rates. A recent eMarketer paper cited live chat as being directly related to 38% of online purchases. And, 62% of consumers who have used live chat said they would be more likely to purchase again from the merchant who provided the service.”

How to Use Snapchat for Business [from C-Leveled; written by Regina Lizik]

“This makes Snapchat perfect for retail establishments that target a younger audience, like clothing stores, can share coupons and give sneak peaks of upcoming merchandise.”

STUDY: Cause Marketing Creates Brand Loyalty Among Millennial Women  [from PR Newser; written by Patrick Coffee]

“54% of Millennial women switched brands because it supported a #cause they care about.”

Written by Sarah

April 18th, 2014 at 9:33 am

The Week in Social Analytics #89

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Instagram Video Done Right: 10 Inspiring Brand Examples [from Social Media Today; written by Katherine Leonard]

“40% of the most-shared Instagram videos are from brands.”

Instagram teaching ad-makers how to be less square [from The Verge; written by Ben Popper and Ellis Hamburger]

“The company today published The Instagram Handbook for Brands, a book profiling 11 companies that it thinks are doing a great job posting content on Instagram. Example posts come from the likes of Patagonia, Chobani, and Disneyland, and are accompanied by tips like “share experiences” and “find beauty everywhere.” The posts Instagram highlights in its book, and in a series of blog posts starting today, are markedly different from the ultra-composed and polished ad made by Michael Kors that tested back in November. Perhaps Instagram learned that ads would need to feel even more authentic and user-generated to avoid alienating users.”

Profile of the Top Vine Video Creators | Videos [from Social Media Today; written by Neil Davidson]

Image and video are predicted to be big in 2014; if you’re thinking about getting into video, see how the top Vine producers do it.

How to Use Instagram in a Genius Way (and Grow Your Audience) [from Ann Handley]

“Instagram allows you to hone your storytelling skills by giving you the necessary—and instant—feedback by how your followers respond (or don’t) to your posts. I’ve learned a lot about what kinds of ‘stories’ resonate in a broader sense—what truly gets my point of view across effectively—just by seeing how my followers there react and what they respond to.”

Retailers Use Social to Spur Shopping, Research [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Now that retailers are accepting that the average shopper isn’t flocking to social media to purchase, they’re realizing that social can be a valuable research tool, and the opinions of online friends can be persuasive.”

The Eight Phases of Brand Love [from Harvard Business Review; written by  Tim Halloran]

“Commitment, intimacy, dependability—she felt all of these, not about Diet Coke, but from it. She loved it as a constant companion, a support mechanism and a celebratory friend. At the time, I thought this was preposterous. We can’t connect with products the same way we connect with people!

But I’ve since learned that in many important ways, that is just what we do. Academic study after academic study has proven it. We don’t just consume or interact with brands. We actually engage in relationships with them.”

Everything you need to know about Twitter’s advertising options [from Social Media Explorer; written by Ben Harper]

If you’re in the UK and looking to advertise on Twitter, this is a must-read for you.

A Paid Search First? Olympic Sponsor Visa Opts To Advertise Its Tumblr On Google, Bing and Yahoo [from Search Engine Land; written by Ginny Marvin]

“Visa also appears to be the only major Olympic sponsor to have made Tumblr its Olympic content hub. From its Tumblr account, Visa links to all of its other social channels and features video and other content assets that are distributed across the other networks, including Facebook where it has over 12 million fans.”

How to Tap Into the Purchasing Power of Millennials with Social Media [from Business 2 Community; written by Scott Scanlon]

“The driving force behind social commerce can be attributed to the Millennial generation’s penchant for social media. Numbering 76 million strong, Millennials, also known as Generation Y, are defined as the demographic cohort born between 1980 and 2000. Their size and combined purchasing power make Millennials a necessary market segment for the future success of most companies.”

For what reasons do Millennials follow a brand’s social accounts?

Study: Social Media Driving Hyper-Growth for SMBs [from Social Times; written by Kimberlee Morrison]

“According to the study, one in six SMBs on the grow are in what was referred to as hyper-growth mode. Indeed, companies experiencing hyper growth report a 73 percent increase in social media spend, indicating that social media is an effective tool for branding, generating word-of-mouth, content marketing and lead generation.”

Three Technology Revolutions [from Pew Internet]

“Three major technology revolutions have occurred during the period the Pew Research Center has been studying digital technology – and yet more are on the horizon.”

Get the stats on Broadband, Mobile, and Social from Pew.

Written by Sarah

February 14th, 2014 at 8:57 am

How Etsy and other small sellers can take advantage of social media

without comments

Social media can be a double-edged sword for a small business: it’s technically free (unless you choose to pay to advertise on it) and can be a huge boost to your business, but it also requires time that can be hard to come by on a small staff– particularly when you happen to be an army of one.

Etsy sellers in particular face a unique set of challenges, since at its heart Etsy is a marketplace for handmade crafts which can be incredibly time-consuming to produce and have to compete with sellers producing on a mass scale. These kinds of sellers are also more likely to have bigger sales and marketing resources at their disposal. How do you compete when you might not have any online marketing expertise yourself? Having a Twitter account and a Facebook page doesn’t mean you know how to market in those places, and it can be overwhelming to think about the number of social platforms available.

What to do? Plan, plan, plan. The initial setup takes the most time, but once you get the hang of things, the return will be well worth it if you’ve done your homework. And we’re here to help.

Before there was Etsy, there was this.
[Photo courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery]

1. Decide where you need to be.

This should be determined by where your customers are; if they’re all on Pinterest and Instagram and you devote most of your time to Facebook, well, you can see how that’s not optimal. If you’re limited on time, pick one or two platforms to be really active on and set up alerts for any others so you won’t miss anything (try out free tools like Mention). It’s a good idea to at least have a presence on platforms you use less often, just in case potential customers try to reach you there.

You might also consider something like Tumblr: you can set up a queue of content to automatically post when you’re busy working during the day and sleeping during the night, and hop in to join conversations whenever you have the time (it’s recommended to make time at least once a day). A traditional blog also allows you to draft and schedule posts ahead of time, but Tumblr has the added bonus of established communities that are easy to tap into with tags and reblogs. There’s also the social aspect that comes with the concept of reblogging; you can always find new people to follow and new communities to immerse yourself in this way. Design and fashion are closely linked, for example, and reblogs are great ways to find new people to talk to about in both of these areas and their overlap.

2. Plan your content out.

If you use social media to only promote what it is that you’re selling, you’re missing the social aspect of it entirely. Decide how much time you can devote to sharing original content vs curating and sharing the content of others in your community of choice (with credit of course). A good ratio of sharing your own products and design alongside other content is about 70/30, and it holds fast across platforms.

Photos are popular and perform well across platforms too; Etsy advises sellers to have large, clear images of their products available, and one advantage of this is having high-quality images to pin and share on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr with a description. That’s your 30% promotion right there.

What about the other 70%? Here are some specific ideas:

  • Share what inspires you in real life: Photos of a walk you went on, an inspiring quilt pattern you saw at a resale shop or festival, you hanging out with other creative people at a conference or just a happy hour.

  • Related to that last point, share some little things from your personal life that you’re comfortable with, like pictures of your pets or your bookshelf. A lot of customers like to connect with the seller behind the items they’re making; it’s part of the homemade, handcrafted appeal. They’re not just buying a sweater, they’re buying a sweater from you.

  • Share photos of items you’ve made and loved so much, you kept them for yourself, or are planning to give them as gifts to a friend, partner or family member. That shows the deep pride you take in your work.

  • Share items from fellow Etsy crafters’ stores that you love: They’ll appreciate the promotion, and might return the favor.

  • Share funny little mistakes: Miss a stitch? Drop a bucket of paint? Cat and toddler get into your stock of feathers and glue? These moments can be hilarious, and are humanizing.

  • To that end, any kind of behind-the-scenes photos and descriptions of the process you go through can help customers understand the value of what you’re making by seeing the time and effort that go into it.

  • Mood photos: There are entire Tumblrs and Pinterest boards devoted to fall, or to a specific color scheme. You can start and curate one of your own, pinning your own items that fit in appropriately alongside images of crispy autumn leaves on roads and pumpkins, all-white schemes, or beach-themed boards.

Pick an approach that’s an appropriate fit for you and what you’re selling in your store.

3. Measure and adjust.

Measurement doesn’t have to mean expensive tools and confusing spreadsheets. There are a lot of free tools that can give you an idea of what’s working and what’s not. Run a free TweetReach snapshot report on your Twitter account, for example, to see which tweets have performed the best and which other accounts talk to and retweet you the most. These are people you want to make sure you’re following and engaging with in return as much as possible.

Additionally if you have a blog or a Tumblr, see which posts have performed the best and why. Was it because of the time of day you posted? The content itself? Did someone popular in the community give you a signal boost by repinning it or tweeting about it? Was it a combination of those things? Keeping track of these factors will help you make the best content plan possible moving forward: you’ll know what to do about the ones you can control, like timing and content.

Want more? Check out the Etsy community on Tumblr, as an example; they also have specific advice for Etsy sellers using Tumblr to promote themselves on their blog, along with some handy Twitter advice. Even if you’re not on Etsy specifically, it should give you a good idea of where to start.

Got a question for us about this? Drop us a line.

Written by Sarah

September 24th, 2013 at 9:46 am