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How to use advanced Twitter search queries: Part 2

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We wager our solution is more effective than sending out these guys. (Image credit: NYPL Digital)

Since our first post on How to use advanced Twitter search queries is one of our most popular posts, we thought we’d break down some more advanced queries we didn’t cover in that writeup. Here are a few more of our favorite advanced Twitter search queries. And let us know if you have a question you don’t see answered here!

Specific phrase or term

Much like on Google, when you want to return results on an exact phrase- especially something that has a common word or popular slang expression in it that might return a lot of noise otherwise- be sure to put it in quotes.

“term1 term2” – search for tweets containing the phrase “term1 term2” (e.g. “aging hippies”)

This way you’ll only get back tweets talking specifically about aging hippies, with those words in that exact order. Without the quotes, you might get results about hippies aging wine or something else irrelevant to what you’re actually looking for.

Tweets containing links

This search filter comes in handy if you’re looking for people who are sharing articles they’ve found or are talking about a specific URL – say an article in the news, or a blog post you’ve recently put out that’s getting a lot of chatter. It’s also a great way to track link shares for a Twitter contest.

filter:links – search only for tweets containing links (e.g. CNN filter:links)

You can add this filter to any search terms to return only tweets that include those terms and a URL.

Tweets in a particular language

Let’s say you’ve run a free TweetReach report with your test query to see what kind of results you’re getting (something we absolutely recommend doing so you can tweak what you need to) and it’s returned a lot of tweets that aren’t in a language that you speak. Or let’s say you want information on a specific event or campaign, like Dia de los Muertos from those who speak Spanish. Use:

lang:NN – to search for only tweets in a particular language (e.g. Nutella lang:en for only English tweets about Nutella)

or

“dia de los muertes” lang:es – Find tweets in spanish about “dia de los muertes”

When added to a search query, the language filter will narrow your results to tweets in that language. Not all languages are supported on Twitter, so check this list to see which are and to get more information about languages on Twitter in general.

And more…

These are just a few we didn’t go over in the first post, so here’s the full list of advanced Twitter search operators if you’re interested in more. And we’ll repeat our advice from last time– Twitter handles fairly simple queries really well, but tends to break with longer and more complex queries. We recommend that you only add in a few advanced operators per query and try to limit the total number of keywords and characters in a search query. Keep it under 5-8 words and 60 characters and you should be fine.

Again, if you ever have any questions about search queries and how to get exactly the data you need from Twitter, just ask us! We’re big Twitter search nerds and can help you figure out even the trickiest search queries.

Written by Sarah

July 30th, 2013 at 8:54 am

Marketing the end of the world

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The world may be ending tomorrow, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get a good deal out of it.

On Friday December 21st, the Mayan Long Count Calendar completes a cycle (a b’ak’tun, if you want to get technical about it) which doomsday-ers decided means the end of the world, and naturally everyone is talking about it on Twitter:

If you’ve decided putting off your holiday shopping over this was a bad idea, fear not– the deals are as varied as the doomsday prophecies. Toyo Tires is giving away prizes on their Facebook page to those who are betting the world isn’t really going to come to an end:

A countdown clock is placed beneath this Mayan-themed add, similar to the one on JetBrains’s page offering 75% off of their products (the world might not end, but this deal will!).

There are many more, and probably some we’ve missed: Lonely Planet has travel tips and a gentle nudge to buy their travel guide at the end of them,  the San Francisco Bulls are having an End-of-the-World-themed game Friday night, Old Spice released an 8-bit style game centered on saving the world, and T.G.I. Friday’s invites you to spend your apocalypse with them at their Last Friday Party.

Jello has taken a more interactive approach on Twitter, using the hashtag #funpocalypse to go along with its campaign of offering up a delicious sacrifice of Jello pudding to appease the Mayan gods and avert the apocalypse. Jello has asked Twitter followers to tweet at them what they would do from their bucket list before the world ends, and is giving away $100 to participants to accomplish the task.

Over 7 days of steadily climbing activity on this hashtag, Jello has reached 572,363 accounts, generating 718, 420 impressions. It’s a great hook for the brand right before the holidays, when many potential customers will be planning out their holiday menus, and might now be inspired to add a good old-fashioned Jello mold to the mix.

Another end-of-the-world campaign with a lot of chatter on Twitter is OkCupid’s email asking users of the dating site if they want to “die alone” and prompting them to log in to find a date for the apocalypse:

OkC users met this email with a mix of indignation and humor on Twitter- some called it dark while others made cat jokes- with tweets reaching 168,004 accounts, for a total of 188,890 impressions. Considering the email went out Wednesday evening and this report was run Thursday morning, that’s a lot of quick exposure for the brand, without even employing the use of a dedicated hashtag to prompt discussion.

One tweet from user @josephbirdsong garnered the most exposure, retweets and mentions:


One clever, themed email to users resulted in 26% of the impressions of Jello’s week-long campaign, thanks mostly to one tweet about it from a single user. Identifying social influencers like that is a big key for brands, especially when an email campaign is kept separate from social media; in fact OkC doesn’t seem to use Twitter very much, tweeting only a few times a month. With the social response from this one campaign, they might want to pay more attention to what is being said about them and join in the conversation.

Unless we all turn to ash tomorrow, that is.

Written by Sarah

December 20th, 2012 at 10:49 am

TweetReach Tip: Measuring the reach of a Twitter account

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Want to measure the reach of a particular Twitter account? Great – you’ve come to the right place! Our TweetReach snapshot reports can measure the reach of any public Twitter account in just a few seconds. And depending on exactly which tweets you want to include in your analysis, we have a few tips for writing your search queries.

From and About

The From and About report is our most often run report and measures all tweets to, from and about an account. Use this query:

@username OR from:username

This report will return all mentions of that Twitter account (including all types of retweets, replies and mentions), as well as all tweets from that Twitter account. This is the most comprehensive set of reach stats for a Twitter account, and covers all activity with and about an username. We call this the From and About report, because it returns data both from a Twitter account, as well as about a Twitter account. Here’s an example From and About report.

About

The About report will include all mentions, replies and retweets of an account. Use this query with the @ symbol:

@username

This report will let you know how many people are talking about a certain Twitter account, and the ways they’re talking about it (retweets, replies and mentions). It will not include original tweets posted from the account. We call this the About report, since it only returns tweets about an account from other Twitter users. Here’s an example About report.

From

The From report will return only tweets from that account. Use this query with the from: operator:

from:username

This reports is useful for measuring the impact of an individual Twitter account without the noise of mentions and other users’ interaction, and it’s great for learning more about the kinds of tweets that account is posting. We call this the From report, since it only includes tweets from that Twitter account. Here’s an example From report.

From and Retweet

Finally, sometimes you want to know only about an account’s tweets and any retweets of those tweets. The From and Retweet report uses this query:

from:username OR “RT @username”

This report will return tweets from an account, as well as any retweets of that account. This is useful for measuring the impact of an account’s tweets and its retweets, without including other mentions or replies. We call this the From and Retweet report, since it only includes original tweets and retweets. Here’s an example From and Retweet report.

Written by Jenn D

August 21st, 2012 at 12:21 pm

Posted in Help

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Announcing the all new TweetReach Report 2.0!

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We’re so very excited to announce the all-new TweetReach Report 2.0! With a brand new look and some great new metrics, the updated, upgraded version of our snapshot report is smarter and better than ever.

Believe it or not, we ran our very first TweetReach report in April 2009. And in the two and half years since that first report, we’ve run millions and millions of reports for customers all over the world. But the report hasn’t really changed much since then. Until now, that is. We’ve given the entire report a massive facelift and added in a lot of the metrics you’ve been asking us for. Take a look…

 

New Report Changes

Some of our favorite new report features include:

  • Top tweets make it easy to identify the most retweeted tweets
  • Top contributors make it easy to identify the most influential and engaged participants
  • Graphical timeline makes it easy to identify when key moments occurred throughout the duration of the conversation
  • Integrated contextual help makes it easy to figure out what a metric means and how we calculate it

We haven’t removed anything from the old report; we’ve only added to it. And there won’t be an increase in cost for these new reports – quick 50-tweet reports are still free, and full reports are still $20. (As always, full reports will include all tweets made available by Twitter, which is usually up to 1,500 tweets from the past week.)

New Report Access

For the next few weeks, the new report will only be available to anyone who purchases a full report or anyone with a TweetReach Pro subscription or a free TweetReach account. So to try it out, either sign in to your current account or sign up for a free TweetReach account.

There’s more information in our helpdesk about the new report with detailed explanations of the new metrics, as well as list of new report FAQs. And please let us know if you have any questions!

Written by Jenn D

December 12th, 2011 at 11:19 am

Posted in Features,News

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This Week in Social Analytics #17

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Welcome back to This Week in Social Analytics, our continuing round-up of some of our favorite posts on social analytics, measurement, Twitter and other items that caught our eye over the past week. Enjoy, and please let us know what you think.

Measuring the value of a tweet
Bridget Carey writes about several brands using Twitter measurement to drive increases in business. Among the examples in the article is a great story of how Exposed PR, C&I Studios and their client IKEA ran a very creative promotion using an in-store “Catpture the Catalog” event to launch their 2012 Catalog. Winners were chosen based on Twitter measurements of impressions and reach. And, the traffic created by the event helped drive Saturday sales at the IKEA store to the highest level in a year.

Twitter Sharing Buttons Drive Sevenfold Increase in Tweet Links
MarketingProfs reports on a recent study by BrightEdge that shows that sites with Twitter sharing buttons are linked to on Twitter nearly seven times more often than sites that do not display tweet buttons. Still, only 53.6% of the largest 10,000 websites are displaying social sharing links or buttons on their homepages.

Digital Marketing and Measurement Model
From Avinash Kaushik, a great 5-step model for measuring the effectiveness of your digital marketing efforts.

Moneyball Will Put Web Analytics on the Map
Big fans of the book, we are definitely planning on checking out the new Moneyball movie. John Lovett believes it will help catapult analytics into the mainstream. Or at least help us explain what we do to our grandmothers!

Written by Dean Cruse

September 23rd, 2011 at 11:25 am

Full TweetReach reports now in PDF and CSV

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Our full TweetReach reports are now delivered in CSV format, as well as PDF! This gives you more flexibility with your data, allowing you to create your own graphs in Excel, quickly sort and search within your tweets, and more. Still only $20, full TweetReach reports are perfect for analysis of recent Twitter activity about a term and baseline account measurement.

More about TweetReach Reports

If you’ve never run a TweetReach report, here’s some more information about what they are and how they work. We offer two types of one-time snapshot reports: a free quick report and a paid full report.

The quick snapshot report is a fast and free way to review the last 50 tweets about a search term. The quick report is free of charge, runs in just a few seconds, and anyone can run a quick report by going to http://tweetreach.com and entering a search term. The quick report provides data on the 50 most recent tweets about your topic, including:

  • Reach
  • Total exposure (impressions)
  • Unique contributors and impressions generated
  • Tweet, RT, reply count
  • Full text of included tweets

The full snapshot report goes back as far as Twitter’s search API allows us to go. To purchase a full report, first run a quick report. If your search term generates more than 50 tweets, you’ll see a link where you can buy the full report. The full report provides the same metrics as a quick report, but includes as many tweets as we can get from Twitter (up to 1500 tweets from the past four days). A full report costs $20 and includes:

  • Reach
  • Total exposure (impressions)
  • Unique contributors and impressions generated
  • Tweet, RT, reply count
  • Full text of included tweets
  • PDF and CSV formats
  • Shareable URL

Written by Jenn D

May 9th, 2011 at 1:50 pm

Posted in News

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One million TweetReach reports!

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Wow, we just ran our 1,000,000th report! To say thank you for helping us reach this huge milestone, full reports are 50% off this week. Use code ONEMILLION to get a full TweetReach report for just $10.

To buy a full report, first run a quick free report for your search query, and then you’ll be given the chance to purchase a full report. Be sure you enter coupon code ONEMILLION to get your 50% discount. This code expires on Monday, May 2, 2011.

So thank you for running so many reports! We couldn’t have reached this milestone without you. Keep on running them and we’ll see how quickly we can get to 2,000,000. If you need help interpreting your report’s numbers, take a look at these TweetReach report guidelines. And try some of these advanced search operators for more targeted results.

As always, please let us know if you have any questions about TweetReach or the metrics in your reports.

Written by Jenn D

April 25th, 2011 at 10:27 pm

Posted in News

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Track Twitter chats and generate transcripts with TweetReach

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Hosting a Twitter chat or Twitter party? TweetReach is a great way to:

  • Track chat participation
  • Measure reach
  • Generate transcripts
  • Determine most retweeted and highest exposure tweets

Our one-time reports are perfect for smaller Twitter chats. For $20, you’ll receive a PDF report of all tweets that include your hashtag, along with a set of summary metrics – the chat’s overall reach, total impressions generated, tweet volume, number of contributors and more. These one-time reports are limited to the most recent 1,500 tweets in the past five days.

If you host a weekly chat or are expecting a high volume of participation, try TweetReach Pro. Our Pro accounts include the TweetReach Tracker (pictured), which will monitor all tweets about your hashtag over time, with no limits on the number of tweets or the length of time. With the Tracker, you’ll have access to myriad in-depth metrics, including reach, volume, contributor influence and so much more. You’ll be able to compare trends over time, print PDF reports, and export your data to Excel.

Give it a try – run a quick report for free to see the most recent 50 tweets about a hashtag.

Written by Jenn D

April 21st, 2011 at 5:36 pm

Posted in Guides

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How to use advanced Twitter search queries

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Twitter supports a number of advanced search operators and filters that allow you to customize your search query and find exactly the tweets you’re looking for. Here are a few of our favorite Twitter search operators and how to use them (with tons of examples).

Find one keyword OR another

First, Twitter does not require an AND or + operator to search for multiple keywords. So don’t include them. Just type together multiple keywords into your query and Twitter will return tweets that include of those terms. For example:

social media metrics

However, sometimes you might want to find tweets that include one keyword or another keyword. Use the OR operator to separate those terms and your report will include tweets that mention one or the other.

metrics OR analytics

You can also chain together multiple keywords to create a more complex query. The OR operator will attach to the word that immediately precedes it, very much like order of operations in algebra. For example, the following query will find tweets that mention social media metrics or social media analytics, because the OR links to the metrics and analytics terms.

social media metrics OR analytics

@Username queries

There are several ways to learn more about the reach of tweets from a particular Twitter account, depending on the type of information you’re looking for.

  1. Tweets to, from and about an account - tweetreachapp
    Run a report for a username but do not include the @symbol.  This will return all mentions of that Twitter account (including retweets and replies), as well as all tweets from that Twitter account. This is the most comprehensive set of reach stats for a specific Twitter account.
  2. Tweets to and about an account – @tweetreachapp
    Run a report for a username and include the @symbol. This will return all mentions of an account, but not any tweets from that account. This report will let you know how many people are talking about a certain Twitter account, and the ways they’re talking about it (including all retweets, replies, and mentions).
  3. Tweets to an account – to:tweetreachapp
    Run a report using the to: operator and a username. Do not use the @ symbol. This report will return only direct replies to that account (where the username is the first word in the tweet). This reports is useful for learning more about how people talk to that account.
  4. Tweets from an account – from:tweetreachapp
    Run a report using the from: operator and a username. Do not use the @ symbol. This report will return only tweets from that account. This reports is useful for measuring the reach of an individual Twitter account, and for learning more about the kinds of tweets that account is posting.

Date filters

You can filter your search results to a particular time period by adding the since: and until: operators to your search query. Use these date filters to narrow down your results. And since you can access up to 1500 tweets per query, if you run a report for each day of a campaign using date filters, you can find more total tweets. For example:

social media since:2011-09-24

@mashable until:2011-09-26

You can use one or both filters in a query. These dates correspond to around 12:00 a.m. UTC, so since filter dates will include tweets from that date, but until filter dates will include tweets up until that date. And no matter what, snapshot reports can only go back about a week, so you still can’t use these filters to access tweets older than a week.

Exclusions

You can exclude certain keywords from your search by adding a minus sign (-) before the keyword. This will filter out all tweets that include that keyword. This is particularly useful if your company/brand/client/product has has a common name and want to exclude mentions of others with that name.

hilton -paris

And more…

These are some of our favorite filters and operators, but here’s the full list of advanced search operators if you’re interested in more. One word of advice – Twitter handles fairly simple queries really well, but tends to break with longer and more complex queries. We recommend that you only add in a few advanced operators per query and try to limit the total number of keywords and characters in a search query. Keep it under 5-8 words and 60 characters and you should be fine. And definitely run free TweetReach reports to test out your more complex queries and see what kinds of tweets they find.

If you ever have any questions about search queries and how to get exactly the data you need from Twitter, just ask us! We’re big Twitter search nerds and can help you figure out even the trickiest search queries.

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Interested in learning more about TweetReach? Take a look at our website or contact our sales team for more.

Written by Jenn D

April 19th, 2011 at 3:14 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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Twitter upgrades search, you get more tweets in reports

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Great news - Twitter has upgraded its search architecture!

What this means for you is that the search index is much bigger than it used to be, so we can go back further in the archive to retrieve tweets for reports. TweetReach reports will now include tweets from the past 7-8 days, and this number could grow. Before yesterday, we were limited to tweets from just the past 5 days – that’s a 50% increase! And don’t worry, full reports are still only $20.

Get a report using the new, extended index at TweetReach.com.

Written by Jenn D

October 7th, 2010 at 3:30 pm

Posted in News

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