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Marketing your conference across platforms: Snapchat and Pinterest

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While Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr are the main three platforms brands tend to work with, other brands are making strides in places like Snapchat and on Pinterest. If you have the resources to play around with these platforms in addition to the big three- or if you know that’s where you audience spends a large amount of their time- take the opportunity to see what you can do in these places to supplement and enhance everything you’re doing elsewhere. They’re particularly fun platforms to utilize in a cross-platform campaign.

Snapchat

We’ve covered the basics and specifics for brands on Snapchat, as well as showing which brands are using it well. Snapchat is a perfect way to keep in touch with event attendees in a lighthearted way throughout a conference; you can send snaps showing upcoming events, or recapping a session or a cocktail party. You can ask for snaps back in order to share free drink tickets or admission to a packed keynote; your creativity is the limit on Snapchat in terms of interaction with your followers. Like Instagram, it’s a great way to show off the atmosphere and get future attendees more interested in booking their trip for the next year.

It’s also a great way to foster conversations between attendees; intimidating names in a field can seem more approachable to build a connection with when they’re willing to send a silly snap.

Photo 6-25-14, 11 59 11 AM

 

A snap from Mashable attending a Google event in San Francisco. 

Just be sure you’re letting attendees know ahead of time across your other platforms that you’re on Snapchat, because most won’t think to look for you there. Having signage up around your conference will also let attendees know where to find you across platforms, and keep official hashtags in play, making post-event tracking easier for you!

Pinterest

Pinterest is a great way to help attendees get organized around a conference; build boards for them so they know what to pack, and what sites to see around town if they decide to come a few days early or stay a few days after. You could even encourage speakers to build their own boards around their areas of expertise, driving traffic back to their sites and letting attendees have a better idea of who they are and what their professional and personal focuses are.

SXSW Pinterest

 

An example of a Pinterest board from SXSW, showing off photos from Instagram and helping attendees figure out what to pack. 

The number and variety of boards you want to build up for your event is up to your creativity, time, and resources. Also keep in mind that Pinterest is great at driving sales, so pinning books your speakers have written after an event is a good idea as well as the same kind of snappy visual reminders you put on Instagram around deadlines for ticket prices.

The bottom line

The bottom line remains the same as in our previous post covering the big three social marketing platforms (aside from Facebook): Play to the strengths of every platform you have a presence on, but especially with these two, don’t be afraid to get creative and have fun.

If you have any questions or examples of great conference marketing we missed, please leave it in the comments!

Written by Sarah

July 15th, 2014 at 8:36 am

The Week in Social Analytics #107

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

7 best practices for using GIFs and cinemagraphs for business [from The Next Web; written by Brian Honigman]

“Don’t create this media just for the sake of doing it, but look to create GIFs and cinemagraphs that sync with your campaigns, as well as your consistent product or service offerings.”

How You Can Use Instagram in Your Business [Business 2 Community; written by Renee Shupe]

“Inject some personality into your marketing efforts. Even businesses that provide services or create products that are not ‘pretty’ enough for Instagram can use the service to their advantage by showcasing their human side. Simple photos of you and your team in action will be interesting to many users, especially if they are accompanied by a fun or thought-provoking caption. It’s also good to show your business engaging in charitable work. You could even post photos of your employees or clients along with brief profiles.”

Pinterest Vs Instagram: Visual Content Marketing [from Heidi Cohen]

Check what your competitors are doing on Pinterest and Instagram. What are they doing that’s successful that you’re not? Also check out the top performers on each platform. Take note of ideas that are worth adapting and making your own.”

The minimalist’s guide to boosting brands’ Instagram engagement [from The Next Web; written by Eric Dahan]

“A brand’s greatest challenge is communicating a sincere message to its followers with each and every Instagram post. A successful grassroots campaign prioritizes quality over quantity; therefore, while multiple hashtags will naturally yield higher potential reach, one or two incentive hashtags will generate better follower engagement.”

Should My Brand Be Active on Tumblr? [from Social Media Today; written by Margaret Murphy]

Visibility. Tumblr incorporates tagging and blog categorization to help users find the subjects they’re interested in. Many blogs garner so much attention online that they have even led to book deals. Have you ever heard of the book ‘Stuff White People Like’? How about ‘Humans of New York’? These both started as Tumblrs.”

Social Brands: The Future Of Marketing In 127 Slides [from Viral Blog; written by Igor Beuker]

“Don’t chase social channels like race dogs on steroids. Certainly not based on reach. Claim your domain, go big, go niche or go home.

The brands that will succeed in the future won’t just give back to communities; they’ll actively build and nurture communities.”

Millennials Lead the Way in Sharing Product and Service Info on Social Media [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Millennials were 22% more likely than the rest of the respondents to report having shared a link to a product or service on social media (39% vs. 32%), and 52% more likely to have posted a picture of a product or service (38% vs. 25%). “

5 Grammar Rules You Can Break on Social Media [from Likeable Media; written by Theresa Braun]

You’ve got to learn the rules in order to responsibly break them.

Welcome to the Era of Surround Storytelling [Edelman Digital; written by Jimmie Stone and Kendra Eash]

“How exactly do we show up differently and tell a brand story that still makes sense in this incredibly windy, fragmented environment?”

Written by Sarah

June 20th, 2014 at 9:16 am

The Week in Social Analytics #106

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

First: Edelman Digital’s new Entertainment Study is out this week.

The Best and Worst of Real-Time Marketing: 4 Lessons for Marketers  [from Fast Company; written by Ekaterina Walter]

Stay relevant and add value- in the right tone- while also enhancing customer service.

How Big Brands Keep Their Social Media Audiences Engaged [from Social Media Examiner; written by Lisa Furgison]

Learn from the biggest and best.

Getting Started With Social Video | Infographic [from Business2Community; written by Megan Ritter]

“Research shows that YouTube works well for How-To guides and instruction videos, while Instagram & Vine allow users short snippets of video; perfect for for announcing an upcoming event or generating interest in a brand new product.

Google Hangouts have proven to be more suitable for business-to-business marketing. Vimeo prides itself in high-quality videos.”

New Research Article: “How Do Health Researchers Use Social Media?” [from The Library Journal; written by Gary Price]

“As the United States moves forward with health reform, the communication gap between researchers and policy makers will need to be narrowed to promote policies informed by evidence.

Social media represent an expanding channel for communication. Academic journals, public health agencies, and health care organizations are increasingly using social media to communicate health information. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now regularly tweets to 290,000 followers.”

Using Social Media for Restaurant Marketing [from Social Media Today; written by Lauren Marinigh]

The most powerful social tools for restaurants are visual, such as Instagram:

“Take photos of your daily or weekly specials to share with the Instagram world, take customers behind the scenes in the kitchen with how you prepare or make some of your menu items, educate the Instagram world on different fun facts on how you are sustainable. Ideas for Instagram are endless for the food venue and one of the most valuable tools you can have.”

Is Instagram Your Visual Content Marketing Superpower? [from Heidi Cohen]

“Georgia Tech and Yahoo Labs researchers found Instagram photos containing faces were 38% more likely to receive likes and 32% more likely to receive comments, even after controlling for social network reach and activity. However, the number of faces, their ages and gender in the photo didn’t have an effect.”

10 Tips to Improve Your Pinterest Marketing Strategy [from Social Mouths; written by William Johnson]

“Before you start, ask yourself these 4 important questions:

  • Is your business visual?
  • Do you have access to images?
  • Is your target market primarily female?
  • Can your website be easily updated with images and content?”

3 Easy Ways Startups Can Use Twitter to Perform Marketing Research [from Social Media Today; written by Ray Wang]

“By leveraging Twitter, start-ups can. . .listen to their target audience’s conversations and learn about their problems, dissatisfactions, and product features they desire. This marketing research approach can help start-ups discover new business opportunities and unravel overlooked problems.”

Why Apple Doesn’t Tweet [from KISSMetrics; written by Sherice Jacob]

“On the surface, it’s difficult to glean any shred of insight from Apple’s hands-off social strategy. True, when innovation and premium experience are the hallmarks you want to be known for, then being a chatty Cathy on social media clashes against that brand image. There’s also the aspect of control. When you keep a tightly-run ship, it’s hard for leaks to penetrate. Still, there’s no excuse for sticking your digital head in the sand and hoping no one notices your failures. Perhaps Apple feels better equipped to handle the customer experience in its stores rather than on its screens.”

Written by Sarah

June 13th, 2014 at 9:19 am

Travel resources on Twitter and more: Updated

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With Memorial Day approaching this weekend, summer travel is on the minds of many, and the resources to plan and execute the best trips for business or for pleasure lie within the social sites you know and love. Last year we looked at the Top travel resources on Twitter: Accounts to follow and chats to attend as well as the 10 best travel resources on social media and beyond. So what does the travel landscape look like on social in 2014?

On Twitter

All of the travel advice and perspective accounts from our Twitter travel resources post are still active and providing information on everything from amateur and budget travel to high-end luxury accommodations; skim the list to find and follow the users that fit your needs.

As for the travel chats, read over the transcripts to get an idea of which ones would be worth joining in on before you plan your next trip:

  • #MexMonday (all day Mondays): Check this one out if you’re planning a trip to Mexico 
  • #TravelTuesday (all day Tuesdays): Chat about all things travel-related
  • #CruiseChat (2pm EST Tuesdays): Whether you’re a veteran cruiser or new to boat-bound travel, find out all you need to know in this chat
  • #NUTS (Not-so-usual-therapy-session, aka travel and specifically roadtrips) seems to be used more as a generic hashtag than a travel related chat, but you can still check out the session recaps on their site.
  • #TTOT (5:30 am/pm EST Tuesdays): standing for Travel Talk on Tuesdays, you can check out the topic ahead of time on their Facebook page.
  • #LuxChat (2:30pm PST every 3rd Wednesday): While #LuxChat doesn’t always cover travel, keep an eye on the month’s chosen topic if treating yourself while you travel is your goal. You can find recaps of their chats on their Tumblr.
  • #TourismChat (2:00pm CST bi-weekly on Thursdays): Check the @tourismchat account for topics and transcripts.
  • #FriFotos (all day Fridays): You can find out each week’s theme from @EpsteinTravels

Other chats to check out:

Aren’t sure how to participate in a Twitter chat, or want to host your own? Check out our posts about how to get the most out of a chat as a participant or as a host.

Other social media travel resources

All of our holiday travel tips from last year still hold true, and if you’re looking at how to get the most out of travel blogging on Tumblr we’ve covered that too. (You can see all of our travel-related Tumblr posts here.)

We still recommend Pinterest for planning what you’re going to pack, what sites you want to see at your destination, and more. Instagram is an amazing way to catalog your travels that lets everyone at home follow along with you and avoids overwhelming them with an album of 200 new photos to parse when you get home.

But what about using Instagram for inspiring and planning your next trip? Stay tuned. We’ll have that for you soon!

If you’ve got any social media travel resources we missed, leave them in the comments, or let us know on Twitter.

Photo courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery. 

Written by Sarah

May 21st, 2014 at 1:31 pm

The Week in Social Analytics #102

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Instagram Ads Are Getting Instant Recall: Taco Bell and Hollister seeing picture-perfect results [from AdWeek; written by Christopher Heine]

“Taco Bell saw a 29 percentage point gain in ad recall for the April rollout of its breakfast menu, per data from Instagram’s user panel that pits a control group against a test group. The fast-food chain’s promos sometimes got engagement rates 400 percent higher compared to its organic posts. According to Union Metrics, Taco Bell’s Instagram following—currently at 411,000—jumped 45 percent during its monthlong ad campaign. The data company also reports that Instagram advertisers—including Michael Kors and Ben & Jerry’s—are averaging 60 percent higher engagement rates for their organic posts in the three days following their paid promos.”

Pair with these other great reads around Instagram this week:

The Value and Meaning of Community In Marketing [from Danny Brown; written by Tinu Abayomi-Paul]

“[Communities] are made up of people I go out of my way to advise, assist, appreciate and attend to when I can – not just when it’s required by the community manager/leader hat I have on that day. And I worry about this concept because there’s this false impression that a community is an entity that can be owned.

Like a thing.

Instead of a gathered group of humans.”

A great connection piece in the ongoing discussion about businesses and humanity. Pair with: How to Speak Like a Human (and Why It Matters) and Mass Personalization Through Digital.

Women Trust Word-of-Mouth Recommendations From Their Friends | Infographic [from Social Times; written by Kimberlee Morrison]

“As for what women sought advice about, 79 percent would ask a friend about food and beverage items, and 28 percent would buy or strongly consider buying something after talking to a friend. Trips and travel were second with 68 percent and third was home furnishing at 61 percent. Nineteen percent of those inquiring about home furnishings would buy or consider buying something immediately after chatting with a friend.

So perhaps when designing social media campaigns, consider seeking testimonials from your most-active users and fans. Their word means a lot.”

Small Business: Are You Using Social Media Photographs? [from Heidi Cohen]

Great tips for using images across social platforms, and tailored to each one.

How American Adults Spend Their Time Online [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Social networks account for the single largest share of consumers’ time online, per the data.”

We’re Using Twitter, Facebook Less, Instagram, Tumblr More, Says Data | STUDY [from All Twitter; written by Shea Bennett]

“In the meantime, Instagram goes from strength-to-strength, registering an incredible 25 percent grow in active usage since Q3 2013.

Tumblr (+22 percent) and Pinterest (+7 percent) also registered solid gains.”

Why We Favorite Tweets, According To Science [from Buzzfeed; written by Charlie Warzel]

A great breakdown of the myriad reasons why we favorite tweets. Pair with our piece on why brands should favorite tweets.

You can access the full study here.

How to Handle Twitter Trolls on Your Business Account [from Social Media Today; written by Matthew Y]

Dealing with negative comments is very different from dealing with trolls.

YouTube: How to Amplify Your Content With Social [from Social Times; written by Christie Barakat]

“To amplify your content using social, YouTube suggests you focus on Top Fans, Google+ Hangouts on Air, leverage all marketing channels and Google+. To be sure you’re leading productive community discussions, start by recognizing your community, develop relationships with top contributors and engage your them on and off YouTube.”

Pinterest Promoted Pins: What You Need To Know [from Edelman Digital; written by Andra Pintiliuc]

“In order to keep promoted pins as relevant as possible and ensure a seamless experience for the user, Pinterest will be taking a ‘Consultative Approach’ to ad selling by working closely with advertisers to understand what type of content resonates with their audience. These recently introduced promoted pins won’t show up in a user’s home feed or within their own pin boards, but rather through searches where they can be bought on a CPC basis and users are organically searching within their favorite categories. Keeping inspiration at the forefront, Pinterest manually selected the advertiser partners and will be working with the brands closely to ensure authenticity is maintained with their content.”

Written by Sarah

May 16th, 2014 at 9:38 am

The Week in Social Analytics #101

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The Surprising Data Behind How Often Brands Should Post On Instagram [from Forbes; written by Jeff Bercovici]

 ”Union Metrics also looked at activity around paid content — ie. advertising — on Instagram, and found that it’s remarkably effective as a tool for driving follower acquisition and engagement. One big brand saw a 32% increase in followers after a 30-day paid campaign, translating into tens of thousands of new followers, plus a corresponding 25% increase in engagements on organic, non-paid posts. That suggests that followers obtained through paid promotion are as valuable as or more valuable than those acquired for free — another reversal of conventional wisdom, if it holds up on a wider scale.”

Want to learn more? Download our full Instagram whitepaper here.

10 Actionable Research Based Instagram Marketing Tips [from Heidi Cohen]

93% of prestige brands have a presence on Instagram, up from 63% in July 2013 according to L2 Think Tank research.”

Emphasis original. Pair with another great piece from Heidi this week: 10 Small Business Marketing Lessons You Need Regardless of Size.

10 Kinds of Stories to Tell with Data [from Harvard Business Review; written by Tom Davenport]

“Narrative is—along with visual analytics—an important way to communicate analytical results to non-analytical people. . .What’s needed is a framework for understanding the different kinds of stories that data and analytics can tell. If you don’t know what kind of story you want to tell, you probably won’t tell a good one.”

7 Ingredients for Employee Social Advocacy [from Convince and Convert; written by Jay Baer]

“. . .employee social media advocacy gives you Authenticity, Trustworthiness, and Reach. But, getting there isn’t a snap. There are many steps involved in creating and maintaining an effective program of this type.”

Click through for the full SlideShare.

The best crowdsourced social media campaigns [from iMedia Connection; written by Drew Hubbard]

Examples of the best crowsourced social campaigns in recent memory. Do you have one to add? Or a failed attempt everyone can learn from?

Over 100 B2B Content Marketing Statistics for 2014 [from TopRank Online Marketing Blog; written by Lee Odden]

This roundup covers everything from “insourcing vs. outsourcing to the most effective tactics”, but we pulled B2B content marketing and social media tactics here:

B2B content marketers use an average of 6 social media platforms

  • 91% of B2B marketers use LinkedIn to distribute content
  • 85% of B2B marketers use Twitter to distribute content
  • 81% of B2B marketers use Facebook to distribute content
  • 73% of B2B marketers use YouTube to distribute content
  • 55% of B2B marketers use Google+ to distribute content
  • 40% of B2B marketers use SlideShare to distribute content
  • 34% of B2B marketers use Pinterest to distribute content
  • 22% of B2B marketers use Instagram to distribute content
  • 22% of B2B marketers use Vimeo to distribute content
  • 16% of B2B marketers use Flickr to distribute content
  • 15% of B2B marketers use StumbleUpon to distribute content
  • 14% of B2B marketers use Foursquare to distribute content
  • 14% of B2B marketers use Tumblr to distribute content
  • 14% of B2B marketers use Vine to distribute content”

On Being Useful [from Social Media Explorer; written by Tracey Parsons]

Excellent follow-up piece on the discussion on the balance brands need to strike between being human and being useful; shows examples of brands who strive to be useful in a human way.

The Ecommerce Brand’s Guide To Pinterest [from Social Fresh; written by Julie Bee]

If you’re an ecommerce brand that has already set up a Pinterest Business Page and gotten verified, then this article tells you where to go next.

How 4 Brands Embraced Tumblr’s New Mobile Design [from AdWeek; written by Garett Sloane]

“‘Tumblr is a place where brands can breathe,’ the company said in today’s mobile redesign announcement. ‘We’re once again stretching the canvas for brands and marketers to create a mobile identity that is truly representative of their brand.’”

Pair with Tumblr declares war on the internet’s identity crisis from The Verge.

Twitter’s Marketing Problem [from stratechery; written by Ben Thompson]

The headline takes away from the interesting potential ideas for Twitter’s future in this article:

“So why not embrace the complexity? Instead of trying to teach new users how to built a curated follower list, build the lists for them. Don’t call them lists, though; embrace Twitter’s TV connection and make them ‘channels.’ Big basketball game? Go to the basketball channel, populated not with the biggest celebrities but with the best and most entertaining tweeters. Build similar channels for specific teams in all sports. Do the same for Apple, Google, and technology; liberals, conservatives, and politics in general; have channels for the Oscars, the Olympics and so on and so forth. And make them good, devoid of the crap that pollutes most hashtags and search results. If the ideal Twitter experience is achieved with a curated list, then provide curated lists and an easy way to switch among them.

Now you have a value prop: easily join the conversation about what is happening in the areas you care about, without the months-long process of building a perfectly customized Twitter feed. Oh, and by the way Ad Person, here is a very easy-to-understand ad unit built around a specific topic filled with self-selected followers.”

Written by Sarah

May 9th, 2014 at 9:27 am

The Week in Social Analytics #100

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Real-time marketing fails from major brands [from iMedia Connection; written by Jenn Deering Davis]

“Just because RTM is the hot marketing tactic of the moment doesn’t mean that it’s right for every brand at every event.”

We are not all Oreo: Check out these RTM fails and the lessons that come with them.

A Brand and a Person Offer the Same Post with Very Different Results [from Social Media Explorer; written by Jason Falls]

A good piece in the ongoing discussion of just how human brands should try to be.

Millennials Tweet About Brands When Rewarded [from All Twitter; written by Mary C. Long]

53% of Millennials could be following your brand on Twitter with the right incentives. Wink wink.

And that’s not all, according to the report, Millennial women are seven times more likely to retweet your brand and three times as likely to follow your brand on Twitter (and see all those great incentives you’re offering). Men are three times as likely to follow on Twitter as well, but they’re a bit less generous on the retweets.”

Emphasis added.

Instagram Video Ads Are Coming Soon [from AdWeek; written by Garett Sloane]

“‘Instagram is almost a magazine, and it wants its ads like in a magazine to be just as compelling as content,’ said James Borow, CEO of digital marketing platform Shift.”

How Do Social Media Styles Differ by Culture/Nation? | Part I [from Social Media Today; written by JC Giraldo]

We’re all in a global market, and understanding regional differences in social media use is important. You can read part 2 here, and part 3 here.

How to Develop a Pinterest Marketing Strategy for your Business [from Eli Rose social media; written by  Liz Jostes]

“Someone landing on your Pinterest profile will make a judgment on your brand and business within seconds. Developing a group of boards that presents a full, well-rounded view of your brand is absolutely the best strategy to have.”

Snapchat: A New Breed of Network [from Social Media Today; written by Derek Smith]

“Still, Snapchat is a potential gold mine for advertisers, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. We’ve become good at ignoring intrusive advertisements, but Snapchat users must quickly pay attention to messages before they’re deleted, so ad impressions could be impactful if they’re relevant to the demographic.”

Online Shares Could Be As Influential As In-Person Recommendations [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Across the three categories – supermarket, automotive, and mini-tablet – the average lift in purchase incidence from an “excellent” online share (a strong positive one) was found to be 9.5%. What that means, according to the analysis, is that an excellent online share increases the perceived value of these products by an average of 9.5% over a neutral share.”

3 Ways to Ensure Your Social Promotions Follow the Law [from Convince and Convert; written by Kevin Bobowski]

Be very clear about your social promotions, or the FTC could come calling.

Written by Sarah

May 2nd, 2014 at 8:26 am

The Week in Social Analytics #99

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Instagram Diverges From Vine By Personalizing Explore Tab [from TechCrunch; written by Josh Constine]

“. . .Instagram’s Explore page is now also personalized with top photos and videos Liked by people you follow. Personalization highlights Instagram’s focus on your own social graph and a subjective vision of beauty, to contrast with Vine, which centers around re-sharing and globally popular expert content creators.”

Pair with MIT algorithm predicts how popular your Instagram photo will be [from The Verge; written by Adrianne Jeffries].

Brands Need to Stop Trying to Play Hero [from AdWeek; written by Gaston Legorburu]

“Remember, the goal is participation, so brands must create experiences beyond the narrative where heroes become immersed and involved. That’s the differentiator between a story told and a story lived.”

Study: 4.7% of Your Customers Generate 100% of Your Online Word of Mouth [from Mack Collier]

“So to put it another way, it is 4.7 percente of your social media following that generates all of the word of mouth results, and by results we mean conversions, not just reach.”

Stop Trying to be Human– Try Being Useful [from Social Media Explorer; written by Tracey Parsons]

 ”It is however, un-natural to “engage” with a product or brand. I almost never talk to my pillow. I occasionally talk to my treadmill, but not in a nice, friendly way. So, let’s drop this whole notion of being more human and try instead to be useful.”

The art of storytelling in 6 content marketing context questions [from Fusion Marketing Experience; written by J-P De Clerck]

“Do brands create stories? Or do stories create brands?”

3 Reasons Your Brand Should Be Using Video On Twitter Right Now [from All Twitter; written by Lauren Dugan]

Video can make it possible to create an in-platform experience to connect with your fans, followers, and customers.

Pins, Tweets, and the Law [from TheBuzzBin; written by Dave Folkens]

A must-read if you’re planning a social contest:

“The issue for the brand in this case, and for all brands across any social network or site online, is disclosure and transparency of the connection between an activity and the incentivized nature of that action. Would a Pinterest user potentially create a board of fashionable shoes they liked? Absolutely. If the reason for the board, though, is a chance to win a prize, then they are essentially advertising to followers on behalf of the brand. Based on FTC guidance within its .com disclosures material, social media pins or posts are equivalent to providing an endorsement of the products. The use of a hashtag as part of the contest was also required and some might argue that was enough to identify that it was a promotion but it didn’t clearly indicate the potential financial connection so it failed in that sense of the disclosure. So while the brand was not (in my opinion) trying to deceive or trick users, it did not meet the true standard of the disclosure guidelines.”

Plus two more pieces on Pinterest from Social Media Today: Pinterest: The Gentler, Kinder Side of Consumer-Generated Endorsements and 9 Marketing Tips for Pinterest.

The Social Media and Device Facts You Need In 2014 [from Heidi Cohen]

“. . .what’s critical for marketers using social media and content marketing is that consumers want the content they choose on the device of their choice when they want it.

Emphasis original.

How to Succeed with Snapchat Marketing [from Social Media Today; written by Chris Syme]

An in-depth breakdown of marketing on the platform famous for its ephemeral content.

Written by Sarah

April 25th, 2014 at 9:38 am

The Week in Social Analytics #97

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

How to control rumours on social media during a disaster [from Phys.org; written by staff]

“Dr Oh believes the main motivation for people turning to Twitter in a crisis is to find out what is happening in their immediate area or to acquaintances, so in order to control the flow of misinformation, emergency communication centres need to be set up quickly to respond to misinformation through social media channels.”

How Brands Can Make the Most Out of Twitter’s New Features [from Social Media Today; written by Jaylee Miguel]

“This visually-led profile will give brands the opportunity to raise awareness and drive engagement for competitions and campaign launches. Gone are the days of scrolling through days worth of tweets – instead, the pinning feature can present key information to users as soon as they land on the page.”

The redesign of Twitter is a great opportunity for brands to be able to visually express themselves better on the platform, without losing the engagement and connectivity Twitter is known most for.

What It’d Be Like To Step Inside Your Twitter Feed [from Fast Company; written by Margaret Rhodes]

“You enter your Twitter handle on a touch screen outside, then walk into the high-tech hut filled with screens and mirrors. A kaleidoscopic stream of notifications, updates, and hashtags flicker and flash around you.”

The Hashtag Test: Best and Worst Practices for Social Media Marketers [from TopRank; written by Nick Ehrenberg]

“Hashtag overuse is a common error in social messaging, sending signals of desperation and inexperience.”

In the UK, Real-Time Social Media Marketing Focuses on the Customer [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Interacting with consumers in real time may be beneficial when it comes to fostering relationships, but it’s not easy, with UK marketers citing many challenges. More than three in five respondents said managing engagement outside of normal working hours was a top challenge, the No. 1 response. Consumers use social media before and after the workday—and they may expect brands that respond to them in real time during the day to do the same in the early morning or at night.”

Why your brand should definitely be on Tumblr: 10 fantastic examples [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

“Tumblr has a huge youth demographic that’s growing rapidly. This demographic also has a higher than average disposable income and very little competition from other brands.

Tumblr is the fifth most visited site in the USA, but only 31 of the top 100 brands operate a Tumblr page. It seems like a no-brainer.”

SnapChat and Building Community Where Your Audience is [from Spin Sucks; written by Eleanor Pierce]

“Because there’s one big reason SnapChat worked for me: I had a community of people who were already there. I didn’t try to force a community into using a trendy new tool just because I wanted them to be there.”

Emphasis original.

The Ultimate Marketing Guide to Using Snapchat for Business [from Social Media Today; written by Ross Simmonds]

“We’re living a in a time where our attention is minimal. Snapchat is a tool that captures someones attention entirely for a few seconds and has the ability cut through the attention crisis. In a world where our attention span is limited to 5 short minutes, a tool like snapchat could be a marketers dream. Millions of people around the world have become accustomed to receiving their news in 140 characters and watching videos in under 5 minutes. It’s changing the way consumers think and the way marketers must react.”

Boards with Benefits: 5 Stand Out Brands on Pinterest [from Social Media Today; written by Deanna Baisden]

“Having 2.5 billion monthly pageviews, there is a growing opportunity for businesses to find success on Pinterest, but what makes a brand stand out amongst a sea of images?”

These brand examples can show you exactly what’s working for brands in different areas on Pinterest.

8 Ways to Get More Pinterest Followers [from Pamorama; written by Pam Dyer]

“Despite being much smaller than Facebook or Twitter at 25 million users, it accounts for more than 23% of all social media-driven sales. More than 47% of online consumers in the U.S. have made a purchase based on Pinterest recommendations, and the average order placed by users of the platform is $179 — compare that to $80 for Facebook and $69 for Twitter, and you can see why it’s important to get more Pinterest followers.”

6 in 10 Americans Aged 65+ Go Online [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Some 59% of Americans aged 65 and older report using the internet as of the second half of 2013, up 6% points from a similar time a year earlier.”

 

Written by Sarah

April 11th, 2014 at 8:50 am

The Week in Social Analytics #95

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

6 Brands That Will Have You Rethinking Your Social Media Marketing Strategy [from Jeff Bullas dot com; written by Elli Bishop]

The big boys have bigger budgets and resources, but smaller brands can still take queues and get ideas from their strategies.

On Instagram, faces are 38% more likely to get ‘Likes’ [from Futurity; written by Jason Maderer]

“Researchers looked at 1.1 million photos on Instagram and found that pictures with human faces are 38 percent more likely to receive likes than photos with no faces.

They’re also 32 percent more likely to attract comments. The number of faces, gender, or age didn’t make a difference.”

Instagram Hits 200 Million Users: What Does This Mean For You? [from Social Media Today; written by Avtar Ram Singh]

“If your target audience is the younger demographic between the ages of 12-24, then you should definitely have a presence on Instagram – even if it’s one that involves you not talking about your product at all, but simply engaging and interacting with your fans to understand what they like.”

The Top 5 Brands on Instagram to Follow [from Jeff Bullas; written by Jason Parks]

Look to some of the best on the platform for inspiration in  your own strategy.

Pinterest Tacks On Paid Ads [from the Wall Street Journal; written by Mike Shields & Douglas MacMillan]

“. . .Pinterest Inc. now has a new goal: to reinvent online advertising.”

Who’s Engaging in Social TV? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Broken down into demographic groups, the study finds that the most socially engaged were Hispanics, for whom 10.5% of viewing occasions could be deemed ‘socially connected viewing.’ The next-most engaged were 25-34-year-olds (9.6%) and 15-24-year-olds (9.2%), while Asians (4.2%) and 45-54-year-olds (4.4%) were by far the least likely to engage in this activity.”

G.M. Uses Social Media to Manage Customers and Its Reputation [from The New York Times; written by Vindu Goel]

“G.M.’s dual approach — going about its normal business while trying to help specific customers — reflects the tightrope the company must walk on social media like Facebook and Twitter, where a customer’s perceptions of a brand are shaped by both what the company does and what other people say about it.”

Who, What, and Where Can You Personalize? Real-Time Personalization is Simpler Than You’d Think [from the Marketo Blog; written by Mike Telem]

“If you’re worried about creating enough personalized content for your real-time campaigns, stop worrying — you can personalize the content you already have. Real-time personalization can leverage existing content, personalizing your calls-to-action, user experience, images, and product offers.”

5 Must Read Perspectives on Social Media Marketing Strategy [from TopRank Online Marketing Blog; written by Lee Odden]

Stepping out of your own perspective sometimes can help inform your plans better than anything else.

10 Video Content Elements To Help You Become A Director [from Heidi Cohen]

If you’re going to get into video, do it right. The audience is there:

77% of global Internet users watch video, according to Global Web Index. In total, 1.15 billion people view video on a connected device. Of these, 626 million view video on a smartphone and 297 million view video on a tablet.”

Emphasis original.

Brands Respond To Customer Support Enquiries 8 Times Faster On Twitter Than On Email | STUDY [from All Twitter; written by Shea Bennett]

“Brands who offer consumer support on Twitter respond to tweets on average eight times faster than the typical brand email response, but only two in five successfully resolved the customer’s enquiry on the social network, reveals a new study.”

 

Written by Sarah

March 28th, 2014 at 9:18 am