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The Week in Social Analytics #79

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Social Data Market Momentum: It’s Not About the Firehose [from Thought Experiments; written by Susan Etlinger]

“But this market, as it’s evolving, is not just a game of ‘Capture the Firehose’; it’s about taking this enormously complex, rich and challenging data set and turning it into insight that can be used to suggest trends that real people in real organizations can act on. It’s not about the firehose; it’s not even about the water. It’s about the fires the water can put out, and the things it can cause to grow.”

Nine Valuable Marketing Lessons From a Nonprofit – Charitywater.org [from KISSMetrics; written by Chloe Gray]

These lessons are equally applicable to for-profit businesses.

“Through a commitment to storytelling, beautiful design, broadcasting a unique value proposition, putting donors at the center of their strategy, and creating highly sharable content, the nonprofit has built a brand that incites the kind of loyalty, excitement, and inspiration most companies dream of.”

How To Build The Perfect Tumblr Profile For Business [from MarketingThink; written by Gerry Moran]

“Tumblr needs to be considered for every brand’s picture-perfect content marketing strategy in 2014. With native buying behavior focusing on the visual experience, brands need to be presenting their story at the multitude of customer touchpoints. This content consumption behavior demands that brands evolve into a curator and syndicator of their content assets on visual and graphical platforms like Tumblr, Instagram and Pinterest.”

4 Creative Instagram Brand Campaigns [from Business 2 Community; written by Theo Schmidt]

Check out four of the most interesting uses of Instagram for brand campaigns.

(And you can find us here on Instagram, if you’re so inclined.)

STUDY: It Only Takes 76 Seconds to Secure or Lose Brand Loyalty [from PR Newser; written by Elizabeth S. Mitchell]

“And assistance doesn’t only need to be fast — it also needs to be direct and personal. The survey revealed that 69% of consumers are more likely to be loyal to a brand that provides live, human assistance at critical moments, and 82% say their perception of a brand improves when live chat is available.”

Avoid a social crisis with one simple question [from Social Media Explorer; written by Tracey Parsons]

Before publishing something on a social account, say it out loud.

“In real time, the Out-Loud Voice litmus test it is a quick affirmation that could be the last check before something is posted online. And let’s be honest, what you post on social as a brand is very much out loud even if it is only written word. And without a doubt, most branded social media gaffes could have been prevented with this test.”

Social Business is not Dead: New charts and data reveal the real evolution of social businesses [from Brian Solis]

“Along the way, I’ve also learned that pushing for social adoption because of technology misses the point of change. The true catalyst isn’t whatever the latest trend in social media is this week. That’s reactive and almost impossible to leapfrog. The truth is that change is fueled by the affect that social media, mobile, and other forms of disruptive technologies have on customer behavior. Whether it’s B2B, B2C, B2B2C, or whatever model you prefer, as long as we’re talking about connected human beings, you can bet that social and digital in general are influencing discovery, decision-making, and impressions in every moment of truth.”

5 Tips to Help Busy Small Business Owners Better Manage their Social Media [from Eli Rose; written by Liz Jostes]

“. . .adjust your expectations to a level you can confidently maintain.”

What Do You Get With A Social Media Audit? [Top Rank Online Marketing; written by Lee Odden]

“Ultimately, the results of a social media marketing audit should reconcile the difference between the current situation and where the brand social media efforts need to be. Just like the other online marketing audits companies will perform, a social media audit is not a “one and done” situation. They should be repeated periodically as part of being accountable for the social media investment.”

B2B Experts: The Difference Between Social Media and Content Marketing [from Social Media B2B; written by Jeffrey L. Cohen]

“Your neighbor isn’t going to talk to you about those darn teenagers and their content marketing. But there’s plenty of discussion by businesses and citizens alike about social media.”

What to Do When Your Twitter Handle is Taken But Isn’t in Use [from Social Media Today; written by Deborah Sweeney]

Helpful guidelines for a 140-character crisis.

History Retweets: How Ancient Romans Created Social Media [from the Wall Street Journal; written by Tom Standage]

“Who invented social media? It wasn’t the founders of Facebook, or Twitter, or even MySpace or Friendster. Social media—the exchange of media within networks of friends and acquaintances—is much older than the Internet. A social-media environment requires two things: a certain level of literacy, and the ability to copy and deliver information cheaply and quickly. This combination first arose in the late Roman republic of the 1st century BC, more than 2,000 years ago.”

Emphasis added.

Written by Sarah

December 6th, 2013 at 9:00 am

Using Twitter as a nonprofit

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We talked to Beverly Robertson of the March of Dimes about using social media as a nonprofit in one of our TakeFives earlier this year, and here’s what she had to say:

TweetReach: Do you feel the approach or reliance on social platforms is different for a nonprofit organization? What would you recommend to one that is just starting on their social strategy, or is uncertain of how to even begin?

Beverly Robertson: Social Media is critical not only for delivering mission messaging, but in introducing the organization to a new audience, as well as keeping track of what people are saying about you and your mission. It also is critical to take the opportunity to thank your donors and volunteers publicly for all of their hard work and support. I cannot tell you what a tremendous response we get for doing that.  My recommendation is jump in, but listen before you speak.”

If you’re a nonprofit who would like to get more out of social media, here are some tips to get started on Twitter:

    1. Listen before you speak: see what other non-profits have to say in their Twitter profiles and down their timelines before you jump into tweeting.

    2. Listening to other accounts can give you a good idea of etiquette and basic interactions, but be sure to use your organization’s voice and be human

    3. Find supporters and follow them. Interact where it’s appropriate: proactively answer questions and provide links to more information

    4. If someone is spreading misinformation about your organization on Twitter, you have options:

      a. Address them and gently correct the information, sharing a link for them/those following the conversation to read more

      b. Send out a tweet from your own account that does not directly address the account spreading the misinformation, but corrects it                                       Either way, try to avoid getting into a verbal battle with someone on Twitter. Neither party ever looks good.

    5. Take major issues offline: if someone comes to you on Twitter with a big problem, make sure you’re mutually following one another and then DM an email address where a deeper discussion can take place

    6. Check for hashtags related to your cause and monitor them; this is one way to track what’s being said about your organization

    7. If there aren’t any obvious ones, create a hashtag and start using it. Encourage your supporters to pick it up as well.

    8. Regularly monitor search results for the name of your organization, both the version you have for Twitter (such as @marchofdimes) and any iterations of the name without the handle: March of Dimes, MoD, etc. (Use Twitter’s search, create columns in TweetDeck and even run a free snapshot report with us.)

    9. Consider hosting a tweet chat. Those interested in supporting your cause could find you through another’s timeline or the chat hashtag, and will have a chance to interact with and follow you, as well as ask questions.

    10. Finally, be sure you have easy-to-find, working social buttons on your website! Supporters won’t know where to find you if you don’t tell them.

Want more information on how nonprofits used social media in 2012? Check out the infographic below featured on Mashable (and if you have any tips for us, leave them in the comments!):

Written by Sarah

April 17th, 2013 at 3:26 pm

Posted in Guides

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