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Archive for the ‘Nielsen’ tag

This Week in Social Analytics #42

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Tumblr Is Worth a Look at For Your Business [from Business2Community; written by Matthew Simonton]

“If your business targets anyone in his or her teens or 20s, you should have a presence on Tumblr. Even if those youngest in these demographics are not your target audience, where do you think they will be in a couple of years? There are reasons why brands beyond College Humor have Tumblr accounts. Huggies has one. Sesame Street has one. Do you see the trend?”

This graph represents the % of respondents who said that they used X platform for at least several hours in a week.

Social Media And The Workplace [INFOGRAPHIC from AllTwitter; post written by Shea Bennett]

“More than half (52.1 percent) of firms now let all of their employees access social media sites at work, with only a little more than one quarter (26.4 percent) actively blocking access to these channels. And while almost two-thirds (64.2 percent) don’t monitor the use of Twitter and Facebook in the office, 68.9 percent do have a social media policy in place.”

State Of The News Media: Everything In Decline But Digital [from Marketing Land; written by Greg Sterling]

“In particular social media figure more prominently as a news ‘channel’ than even a couple of years ago. According to a 2012 Pew Research Center study, 19 percent of Americans received news or headlines on a social network ‘yesterday.’ The number was almost double (34 percent) for people in the 18 – 24 age category.”

Link to the full Pew study here.

Integrate Big Data Into Your Marketing Strategy [from Social Media Today; written by Yoav Dembak]

“I wanted to share a few easy ways anyone can start integrating analytics into marketing campaigns.”

A great short piece for those shaky on their feet, starting out in social media marketing.

New Study Confirms Correlation Between Twitter and TV Ratings [from Nielsen]

“Specifically, the study found that for 18-34 year olds, an 8.5% increase in Twitter volume corresponds to a 1% increase in TV ratings for premiere episodes, and a 4.2% increase in Twitter volume corresponds with a 1% increase in ratings for midseason episodes. Additionally, a 14.0% increase in Twitter volume is associated with a 1% increase in TV program ratings for 35-49 year olds, reflecting a stronger relationship between Twitter and TV for younger audiences.”

 

Written by Sarah

March 22nd, 2013 at 9:05 am

SXSW preview: How Twitter is changing how we watch TV

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One of our very own will be presenting at SXSW Interactive this year. Jenn Deering Davis, Union Metrics Co-Founder and Chief Community Officer, will be speaking about how Twitter has changed how we watch TV on Saturday, March 9 during the festival. We wanted to get a preview of her presentation, so we thought we’d ask her a few questions about social TV and share her responses with you.

  1. How do you think social media has changed how viewers communicate about television shows?

Social media provides a great place for us to talk about our favorite TV shows and characters. It allows fans distributed across the country – even the globe – to share the experience of watching a show together. TV is such an important part of our culture, particularly in the United States; many of us watch some TV every single day, and we’re deeply connected to the shows we watch and the people in them. We want to talk about TV, and social media channels like Twitter are the perfect place for those conversations.

  1. What are some of the creative strategies that networks and advertisers are employing to tap into social TV?  

There’s certainly a lot of hashtag use right now. You can’t watch a TV show – or a commercial – without seeing hashtags all over the place. Some of the more interesting fan engagement initiatives include creating character Twitter accounts that tweet during and between episodes, sharing content exhaust like behind-the scenes photos and outtakes, and running social games and contests to unlock premium content.

  1. What shows are doing social TV really well?

So many shows and show runners are doing interesting things on social media. Pretty Little Liars is one of the canonical examples – PLL and the team at ABC Family have created a huge and highly engaged following on Twitter and Facebook. As for others, I love how characters from Archer tweet as themselves (and to each other!), how Hollywood award shows like the Golden Globes post pictures from the red carpet and backstage, and how Netflix capitalized on the huge social interest around its new show House of Cards. There are so many great examples. For more, you’ll just have to come to the panel.

  1. How important is a standard measurement system for social TV and do you think Twitter’s work with Nielsen will push it forward?

Networks have been using Twitter as a way to understand the real-time pulse of their shows for several years, and I think it’s smart of Nielsen and Twitter to work together to formalize some of that. We can learn a lot about what fans think about a show by measuring their tweets. For example, tracking minute-by-minute volume helps us understand viewer interest spikes, telling us exactly what onscreen moments are exciting to the audience. I think this area will mature a great deal over the next few years.

  1. Twitter is at the center of the social TV discussion, but what other platforms do you think are poised to become a larger part of this movement?

Twitter was the first social channel to be really successful in the TV space for a variety of reasons (which I’ll discuss in more detail at SXSW), but we’re starting to see a lot more fan participation in other channels, as well. Tumblr is a big one, because millions of fans go to Tumblr to share and remix  all kinds of amazing visual content about their favorite shows, and that content spreads like crazy on Tumblr. Social TV conversations happen in all the social media spaces we spend time in, but we’ve just heard the most about Twitter so far. I think that’s changing.

  1. How does online streaming content tap into social TV? Will advertisers cater to this demographic, or keep pushing for live viewing?

Great question. We’re starting to understand more about how social impacts (and is impacted by) both live and streamed viewing. I’ll get into this more during the talk, but we’re actually seeing a comeback in live TV right now! It’s fascinating stuff, but I’ll leave that as a teaser for now.

If you want to hear more, then be sure to check out Jenn’s talk at SXSW in Austin next week. And be sure to go say hi afterwards – she’d love to talk to you. She might even have party invites to share if you ask nicely.

Written by Sarah

February 28th, 2013 at 8:10 am