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Archive for the ‘Help’ tag

Union Metrics support hours for Labor Day weekend

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The Union Metrics team will be celebrating a long holiday weekend for the next couple days. We’re still available if you have any questions, but please allow us a little extra time to return your calls and emails on the following dates:

Saturday, August 30 – Monday, September 1

On these days, our support staff will return all non-urgent requests within 24 hours and urgent requests as soon as possible. As always, you can get in touch with us in many ways:

And of course, take a look around on our helpdesk to see if any of your questions are answered in our FAQs. And have a great Labor Day weekend!

Written by Jenn D

August 29th, 2014 at 3:25 pm

Posted in News

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TweetReach: Where our Twitter data comes from

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We use Gnip so we don’t have to send poor Merle down into the Twitter data mines.

We’ve written before about the five questions you should be asking your social analytics provider, and we wanted to make it clear what you’re getting when you choose TweetReach Pro. If you still have questions after you read this, feel free to share them in the comments below, or drop us a line. We’ll be happy to help answer them!

Does Union Metrics have access to the Twitter firehose for TweetReach?

This is a question we get fairly often, and although we address it in our help docs, we also wanted to address it here as it’s a little more complicated than it might seem. The short answer is yes. As for the long answer…

Twitter has two licensed data resellers - Gnip and Datasift - who can provide access to the full Twitter firehose to third parties. The full Twitter firehose includes full-coverage, real-time streaming access to all of the data from Twitter. In most cases, direct access to the full firehose is unnecessary, not to mention very expensive to consume and store. After all, as of last fall, Twitter has 215 million monthly active users, 100 million daily active users, and sees 500 million tweets per day.

So companies like us here at Union Metrics work with one of these data resellers, who have built powerful filtering tools on top of the Twitter firehose to provide high-quality access to the data we need. This makes it more efficient in both time and money for us provide the detailed, comprehensive Twitter analytics our customers want. We’ve elected to work with Gnip, and in fact are part of their Plugged In to Gnip partner program, which means they recognize that we can deliver you the highest quality Twitter data available through licensed access to the full Twitter firehose. This means you don’t have to worry about missing any data.

Our TweetReach Pro Trackers are built on Gnip’s real-time PowerTrack stream, meaning we have full access to all tweets as they are posted – with no rate limits! – for any keyword, hashtag or account you want to analyze. Similarly, TweetReach premium historical analytics are built on Gnip’s Historical PowerTrack product, and provide complete access to the Twitter archive, dating back to March of 2006. Both include full tweet coverage.

To sum up: TweetReach Twitter analytics are built from licensed access to the full Twitter firehose through Gnip.

What about Union Metrics’ other products?

Union Metrics is a certified Plugged In To Gnip partner, which means we have commercially licensed, full-coverage access to both Twitter and Tumblr data. That’s reliable, reputable data you can count on, both now and in the future. Here’s the breakdown of the data source for each of our products:

  • Our TweetReach Pro Trackers have Gnip PowerTrack access – that’s full coverage of all public tweets in real time for any search terms you enter. That means no missed tweets and no sampling.
  • Our TweetReach snapshot reports use the Twitter Search API, so they’re great for quick estimates of recent activity, but are limited to about 1500 tweets from the past week.
  • Our TweetReach premium historical analytics use Gnip’s Historical PowerTrack. That gives us full access to any public tweet in Twitter’s history, dating back to the very first tweet posted in March 2006.
  • Finally, with Union Metrics for Tumblr, we consume the full Tumblr firehose. That means we process 100% of all public posts, notes and other Tumblr activities.

If you have any other questions about our data access, please just ask!

Written by Sarah

January 29th, 2014 at 1:47 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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TweetReach Tip: Excluding tweets from your search

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You can exclude certain tweets from your results by using the minus (“-”) operator in your TweetReach search. You can exclude tweets that include certain keywords or tweets that mention a certain account. For example:

 Sandwiches -ham 

or

#swag -justinbieber

The second example is a good one to use if you find a spammer or someone whose tweets you really don’t want to include in your reports.

Note that there should not be a space between the minus and the word you’re excluding.  If you’d like to exclude a two word phrase, wrap them in quotation marks, like this:

#swag -”justin bieber”

Written by Sarah

November 21st, 2013 at 9:08 am

TweetReach Tip: Searching for a specific tweet

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Say you want to search for a specific tweet in a snapshot report, like this one from our Twitter timeline:

TR Tweet

Be sure to search for the text of the tweet, rather than the tweet’s unique URL. Try searching for the first part of the tweet text. Keep it short – under 60 characters – and wrap it in quotations marks in order to catch any and all retweets. Like this:

“Vanity metrics- like FB Likes- have their uses”

Written by Sarah

November 14th, 2013 at 2:29 pm

TweetReach Tip: How to isolate specific dates in a Tracker

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To isolate specific dates in your TweetReach Tracker, simply click on the calendar icon in the upper right hand corner of your screen, and specify the date range that you want.

Tracker Date Range

 

That’s it!

Still got a question? Let us know! Or find us on Twitter

Written by Sarah

October 8th, 2013 at 12:29 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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TweetReach Tip: Searching for tweets from a specific account

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If you set up a TweetReach snapshot report or Tracker to search for @username, that will only return mentions and retweets of that Twitter account. So, that might be what you’re looking for. But if you’d like to see tweets to and from that account, add in the from:username query, like this:

@username OR from:username

This will make sure we pull all mentions, retweets, and replies to your Twitter handle, as well as tweets from your account. That’s the best way to see the full set of interactions with a particular account. Want to see it in action? Here’s an example.

Still got a question? Let us know! Or find us on Twitter

Written by Sarah

September 26th, 2013 at 1:18 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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How to use advanced Twitter search queries: Part 2

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We wager our solution is more effective than sending out these guys. (Image credit: NYPL Digital)

Since our first post on How to use advanced Twitter search queries is one of our most popular posts, we thought we’d break down some more advanced queries we didn’t cover in that writeup. Here are a few more of our favorite advanced Twitter search queries. And let us know if you have a question you don’t see answered here!

Specific phrase or term

Much like on Google, when you want to return results on an exact phrase- especially something that has a common word or popular slang expression in it that might return a lot of noise otherwise- be sure to put it in quotes.

“term1 term2” – search for tweets containing the phrase “term1 term2” (e.g. “aging hippies”)

This way you’ll only get back tweets talking specifically about aging hippies, with those words in that exact order. Without the quotes, you might get results about hippies aging wine or something else irrelevant to what you’re actually looking for.

Tweets containing links

This search filter comes in handy if you’re looking for people who are sharing articles they’ve found or are talking about a specific URL – say an article in the news, or a blog post you’ve recently put out that’s getting a lot of chatter. It’s also a great way to track link shares for a Twitter contest.

filter:links – search only for tweets containing links (e.g. CNN filter:links)

You can add this filter to any search terms to return only tweets that include those terms and a URL.

Tweets in a particular language

Let’s say you’ve run a free TweetReach report with your test query to see what kind of results you’re getting (something we absolutely recommend doing so you can tweak what you need to) and it’s returned a lot of tweets that aren’t in a language that you speak. Or let’s say you want information on a specific event or campaign, like Dia de los Muertos from those who speak Spanish. Use:

lang:NN – to search for only tweets in a particular language (e.g. Nutella lang:en for only English tweets about Nutella)

or

“dia de los muertes” lang:es – Find tweets in spanish about “dia de los muertes”

When added to a search query, the language filter will narrow your results to tweets in that language. Not all languages are supported on Twitter, so check this list to see which are and to get more information about languages on Twitter in general.

And more…

These are just a few we didn’t go over in the first post, so here’s the full list of advanced Twitter search operators if you’re interested in more. And we’ll repeat our advice from last time– Twitter handles fairly simple queries really well, but tends to break with longer and more complex queries. We recommend that you only add in a few advanced operators per query and try to limit the total number of keywords and characters in a search query. Keep it under 5-8 words and 60 characters and you should be fine.

Again, if you ever have any questions about search queries and how to get exactly the data you need from Twitter, just ask us! We’re big Twitter search nerds and can help you figure out even the trickiest search queries.

Written by Sarah

July 30th, 2013 at 8:54 am

TweetReach Tip: Common Tracker mistakes

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Much like the double-tap method is essential for zombie eradication, double- and triple-checking your Tracker queries is essential to success with your TweetReach Pro Trackers. Be sure you aren’t making any of the following common mistakes with your Tracker setup, and you’ll get the best results possible with your Tracker.

Mistake #1: Not making the tweets you send from your own Twitter account easily trackable.

  • Put your hashtag toward the beginning of your campaign tweets. If you put it toward the end, it could get cut off in subsequent retweets. Also be sure you keep your campaign tweets to a shorter, shareable length; the “perfect tweet length appears to be around 100 characters”, according to a study by TrackSocial.
  • If you begin a tweet with someone’s Twitter handle – for example, @tweetreachapp – only that account and anyone who follows both of you will see it. Be sure to add a period or other text to the beginning of the tweet if you want to gain the largest impression possible: “.@tweetreachapp is a great tool”. You can read more about @replies and impressions on our helpdeskThe bottom line: if you want to track a tweet and get the most data about it possible, don’t start it with a Twitter handle.

Mistake #2: Small errors in your Tracker queries can keep you from getting the data you need.

  • Make sure you’ve set up the right search terms in your Tracker. For example, banana won’t capture tweets including the word bananas. And #banana will only find uses of the hashtag, but not general uses of the word banana. Add multiple queries if you need to (banana, bananas, #banana AND #bananas).
  • Make sure you spell your search terms correctly. It seems basic, but checking on this will save you from missing data. Also keep be sure to add queries to include accented characters and punctuation, as well as alternative spellings. For example: “shop ‘til you drop” and “shop til you drop”, or  dakar perú and dakar peru. 
  • Make sure you’re using the right form of your hashtag, or search for multiple hashtags if appropriate. Likewise, make sure the tweets you’re sending out have the correct hashtag, and do what you can to communicate the official version to participants. Sometimes, you may need to adapt and track audience-generated hashtags; the official form doesn’t always get the use you’re expecting.

Want more tips on improving your search queries? You can read all about it here. And if you have any questions about your Trackers, just ask!

Written by Sarah

January 30th, 2013 at 7:30 am

Posted in Help

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TweetReach 2012 holiday support hours

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The TweetReach support team will be around to answer all of your questions throughout the final weeks of 2012. However, please allow them a little extra time to return your calls and emails on the following dates, as they might be stuffing themselves with holiday treats and spending time with their families.

  • Saturday, December 22 – Tuesday, December 25
  • Sunday, December 30 – Tuesday, January 1

On these days, we will return all non-urgent requests within 24 hours and urgent requests as soon as possible. As always, you can get in touch with us in many ways. Email is the fastest way to get through to us during the holidays (aren’t smart phones great?).

Happy holidays from Union Metrics!

Written by Sarah

December 19th, 2012 at 10:40 am

Posted in Help

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TweetReach 2012 holiday support hours

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The TweetReach support team will be around to answer all of your questions throughout the final weeks of 2012. However, please allow them a little extra time to return your calls and emails on the following dates, as they might be stuffing themselves with holiday treats and spending time with their families.

Thursday, November 22 – Friday, November 23
Saturday, December 22 – Tuesday, December 25

On these days, we will return all non-urgent requests within 24 hours and urgent requests as soon as possible. As always, you can get in touch with us in many ways. Email is the fastest way to get through to us during the holidays (aren’t smart phones great?).

Happy holidays!

Written by admin

November 21st, 2012 at 11:06 am

Posted in News

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