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Archive for the ‘event’ tag

Headed to SXSW V2V? So are we!

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We’ll be in Las Vegas next week for SXSW’s new V2V conference and we’d love to meet up. Drop us a line, or catch us on Twitter to let us know your plans.

Also, check out our founder Jenn Deering Davis’ session on Market Like the Movies (Without the Studio Budget), happening Monday, August 12 at 4:30 p.m. PT. Learn how to market your startup using the social media strategies Hollywood has perfected to drum up excitement about TV and movies on social sites like Twitter, Tumblr and Facebook. All without worrying about an unflattering picture of you showing up on the cover of a grocery store gossip mag.

Tumblr is cool

See you in Vegas!

Photo credit: Tumblr founder David Karp’s own Tumblr

Written by Sarah

August 7th, 2013 at 4:10 pm

Posted in Events,News

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7 tips to maximize your conference attendance using Twitter

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We’ve covered how you can maximize using Twitter during your conference as a host– now what about as an attendee? Here are some quick tips to maximize your conference experience via Twitter:

The basics:

  • Learn the official event hashtag & double-check that you’re typing it correctly: seems simple enough, but you’ll miss out on a lot of connection and engagement with a typo
  • Make sure you’re following the host’s official account (or accounts): check periodically to see if there have been any changes in the scheduling, location of panels or smaller events, or any other breaking conference news
  • Advanced move? Research food places (and coffeeshops; even bars with good happy hour!) near the conference location, and follow some of them on Twitter. You might score a discount with a Twitter coupon, or at least have a place to invite follow attendees around sessions!

What you’re saying:

  • Quoting someone? Cite it as the speaker or an audience member, and tag it with their Twitter handle, if you have the information handy
  • Keep it short and sweet: you’ll be more likely to be retweeted if you keep your character count low, and other conference goers don’t have to trim your tweet down to add their own thoughts before retweeting
  • Share, follow back, add your thoughts– don’t just lurk in the conference hashtag streams! This is how you strike up conversations and form relationships with fellow attendees
  • Turn online interactions into offline: notice you keep tweeting with the same people? Meet up for lunch, coffee or happy hour to take your conference networking offline

Got something we missed? Share it in the comments. And we’ll see you at #SXSWi 2013!

Photo credit: Scott Beale/Laughing Squid at laughingsquid.com

Written by Sarah

February 12th, 2013 at 11:44 am

Posted in Guides

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Tracking tweets at BlogWorld 2012

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The BlogWorld and New Media Expo 2012 was held earlier this month in New York and we were happy to have worked with the conference organizers to track the tweets during the event.

So what was Twitter buzzing about? During the conference from June 5 through June 7, the official #BWENY‬ hashtag was tweeted over 18,000 times by more than 4,600 people, generating a unique reach of over 6 million and almost 87 million impressions.

Like many of the conferences we track, each day saw a huge spike in tweets during the first hour of conference (around 9 a.m.) each day, a big drop during lunch hour, and an increase in activity around 2 p.m. There was low Twitter activity during the evening parties as attendees took their discussion offline and continued networking in person.

The five most retweeted tweets were by: @griner, @jaybaer, @thebloggess, @juliaroy, and @webseriestoday, and those tweets combined generated 676,388 impressions.

The tweet with the highest exposure came from Ted Rubin:

And, overall, the most active contributors to the Twitter backchannel were:

At the end of day two of the conference, Blog World founders Rick Calvert and Dave Cynkin announced that going forward, the conference would be renamed New Media Expo (NMX). They described the change to better reflect the changing industry and the broader community of bloggers, podcasters, and Web TV producers.

What do you think? We’re excited to see how the event evolves!

Written by Dean Cruse

June 21st, 2012 at 10:33 am

Posted in Events

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16 ways to use Twitter to improve your next conference

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Twitter is the perfect social channel for conferences. It provides a real-time, public and searchable record of tweets about a conference that organizers, speakers and attendees can follow. Twitter even allows people who can’t attend in person to read along as conference events unfold. And Twitter gives conference planners an archive of participant comments, as well as measurable data they can report back to sponsors.

If you’re a conference organizer or producer, here are a few things you can do to make sure you’re getting the most out of Twitter during your next event.

Using an official conference hashtag

  1. Select a unique official hashtag. Make sure no other events are using this hashtag and that it’s separate from general topical conversation. Keep it short and easy to remember. A good conference hashtag will include the conference name or abbreviation, and sometimes the year or location. If you can, avoid using underscores or other punctuation in your hashtag to keep it simple (and to be sure the hashtag works in every Twitter client). Some we like include #BWENY (BlogWorld Expo) and #ica12 (International Communication Association).
  2. Communicate the official hashtag. Try to make the official hashtag easy to find. Post the official conference hashtag on presentation slides, as well as signs and posters around the conference venue, list it on the conference website, and use it in official tweets from your own and other organizers’ Twitter accounts. Encourage speakers and sponsors to use the hashtag.
  3. Track mentions of the official and unofficial hashtags. In addition to the main official hashtag, attendees may adopt track- or interest group-specific hashtags or mistakenly use an incorrect hashtag. Try to keep track of all relevant hashtags, even if they’re not officially endorsed.

Surfacing interesting conference topics

  1. Follow conversation as it unfolds. Keep track of attendee tweets about the conference, both to monitor conversation during the event, as well to create an archive for future access. It’s very simple to follow the use of a hashtag in real time with any number of Twitter clients and applications, so pick your favorite. If you want to share these tweets, consider displaying them live on a monitor at the conference or on the conference website.
  2. Pay attention to retweets. Use retweet counts to keep track of which tweets are getting the most traction on Twitter. What speakers, presentations, or topics are being retweeted? You can use this information to make your next conference even better.
  3. Use official handle to ask questions. Twitter is great for real-time interactions, so use the official conference account to ask attendees how things are going. Get live feedback on presentations, the venue, conference logistics and more.
  4. Find problems quickly. Monitor conversation about the conference throughout to detect problems. Is the wifi not working? Are participants unable to find certain rooms? If something is going wrong and you’re actively monitoring conference tweets, you can fix small problems before they become big problems.

Sharing important conference content

  1. Use official handle to post announcements and schedule changes. Give participants a central and reliable channel on Twitter where they can access important conference information. If there are any important announcements or changes to the conference schedule, post them to the official Twitter account so attendees can find and share them.
  2. Distribute speaker slides. Use Twitter to make it easy for attendees to find speakers’ presentation slides. Encourage speakers to share their slides through their own Twitter accounts, and retweet those slides from the official account. Also share links back to the conference website where participants can access and download conference slides and other documents.
  3. Answer attendee questions. Throughout the conference, use Twitter to answer audience questions, direct attendees to the appropriate resources and make sure everyone is getting the most out of the event.

Tracking audience engagement

  1. Measure total Twitter audience size. With the spread of conference content on social media like Twitter, the size of the audience can grow well beyond the number of attendees physically present. Measure the total reach and exposure for conference tweets, as well as the number of total tweets and unique contributors.
  2. Determine popular speakers and presentations. Analyze conference Twitter engagement by tracking metrics like retweets, replies, favorites and impressions to learn which topics are generating buzz. Search for speaker and panel names, presentation topics and track titles to see which ones are most talked about. Find out which images are being shared the most to determine attendees’ favorite moments, and track shared URLs to see which websites and pages have been most useful to participants.
  3. Share metrics with sponsors. Report this information back to conference sponsors to demonstrate the value of their sponsorship. Showing sponsors how many more people their brands reached beyond in-person conference attendance can be very valuable to securing future sponsorships. When possible, share specific examples of effective tweets about or from conference sponsors.

Gathering feedback for your next conference

  1. Tweet links to conference feedback survey. In addition to sending a post-conference email asking attendees for feedback, also post a link to the feedback survey on the official Twitter account. Some attendees may be more likely to respond on Twitter, so this gives them another opportunity to respond.
  2. Compare this conference to other events. How did this conference compare to recent or related conferences? If you have Twitter metrics for previous years’ conferences or other similar conferences in your industry, use them to see how this year’s event measured up. Look specifically for changes in engagement and participation, as well as reach and exposure. If this event’s metrics were lower, try to figure out why and how you can improve next time. If they were higher, that’s great, but try to learn more about why your numbers were up.
  3. Analyze qualitative tweet content. In addition to quantitative audience and engagement metrics, tweets are a great source of qualitative data about the conference. Read through a tweet transcript after the event is over to see what attendees liked and didn’t like. Mine this transcript for any feedback you can use to improve for next time. In some cases, an in-depth content or sentiment analysis might be useful.

Photo credit: Scott Beale/Laughing Squid at laughingsquid.com

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Interested in learning more about TweetReach? Take a look at our website or contact our sales team for more.

Written by Jenn D

June 4th, 2012 at 3:56 pm

Posted in Guides

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Twitter and the election: Revisiting predictions

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When the 2012 United States Republican presidential primaries and caucuses began back in January, we took a look at whether Twitter activity could be used as a predictor of the elections. We started tracking all tweets that mentioned any of a candidate’s Twitter accounts (personal and campaign) and based on the Twitter activity coming out of the Iowa caucuses, we saw that Twitter activity was less an indicator of the outcome, and more a reflection of the overall conversation happening around the candidate. Reach, exposure, and activity were largely driven by mentions by popular news and media accounts, many of which have significant numbers of followers and retweets.

Since January, the Twitter activity on the candidates has been staggering – some of the largest reach and exposure we’ve ever tracked, with over 8 million tweets from hundreds of thousands of contributors. These contributors reached more than 120 million unique Twitter accounts and generated almost 22 billion impressions.

Right before the Super Tuesday primaries in March, we launched the TweetReach Republican Primary Tracker which looked at the relationship between what people say on Twitter and what they do at the polls.  In the visualization, we mapped the number of unique Twitter users talking about a candidate to the y-axis, polling results to the x-axis, and tweet volume to the circle radius.

While, based on our previous analysis, we did not believe Twitter conversations could predict winners, we thought it would be interesting to see what tweets can tell us about how potential voters feel about the candidates. The visualizer confirmed that despite a candidate’s tweet volume, reach, and exposure on Twitter, these data were not a good predictor of election results. They are, however, a great way to understand how popular dialogue about a candidate translates into Twitter conversation.

Today, with Rick Santorum bowing out of the race, we took another look and found that Twitter conversation about Santorum had been relatively quiet since Super Tuesday but, as expected, spiked with today’s news as people came out of the woodwork to Tweet about the candidate.

In fact, a full 21% of Rick Santorum’s exposure since Super Tuesday (over 368 million impressions) occurred today after the announcement. When viewed with the TweetReach Republican Primary Tracker, the impact of the conversation around Santorum’s departure is even more pronounced.

We look forward to tracking the upcoming full election. In the meantime, we’d love to know what you think!

Written by Dean Cruse

April 10th, 2012 at 5:52 pm

Tracking tweets about the 47th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards

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This weekend, we tracked tweets about the 47th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards. During the three-hour broadcast on Sunday, April 1, 2012, we tracked 214,407 tweets from more than 96K contributors that reached more than 43.5 million unique Twitter accounts. Tweet volume peaked at 3,686 tweets per minute during the show.

The most retweeted tweet of the night was from @Country_Words and received 1,397 retweets.

The most buzzed about Twitter moments from the ACM Awards show were:

  1. Song of the Year goes to Eli Young Band for “Crazy Girl”
  2. Entertainer of the Year goes to Taylor Swift
  3. Album of the Year goes to Miranda Lambert for “Four the Record”
  4. Vocal Group of the Year goes to Lady Antebellum
  5. Male Vocalist of the Year goes to Blake Shelton
  6. Single Record of the Year goes to Jason Aldean and Kelly Clarkson for ”Don’t You Wanna Stay”
  7. New Artist of the Year goes to Scotty McCreery
  8. Female Vocalist of the Year goes to Miranda Lambert

Overall, thousands of tweets were posted about Blake Shelton, Miranda Lambert, Taylor Swift, and Reba McEntire. Shelton and McEntire were the show’s hosts, while Lambert and Swift were two of the night’s big winners. Finally, here’s the infographic we prepared for the 2012 ACMs (click to see full size).

What did you think? Did you watch? What was your favorite moment from the awards show?

Written by Jenn D

April 2nd, 2012 at 4:42 pm

Posted in Events

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A night at the Oscars: What did Twitter think about the 2012 Academy Awards?

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The 84th annual Academy Awards were held this weekend. As we’ve seen in years past, Twitter has a lot to say about the Academy Award winners, losers (non-winning nominees?), and the show in general.

This year, we tracked tweets about the Oscars – more than 2 million of them - throughout the show’s broadcast on Sunday, February 26, 2012, and collected them in our Academy Awards Twitter Explorer. Click around the explorer to see when tweets were posted about nominees in six of the main categories, including Best Picture, Best Actor and Best Actress. Or, read on for our take on what Twitter thought of the 2012 Academy Awards.

Twitter’s top ten favorite Oscar 2012 moments were, in order:

  1. Cirque du Soleil performance. The audience seemed entranced by the acrobatic dancers, and so did Twitter.
  2. Octavia Spencer wins Best Supporting Actress for her role in The Help. She even got a standing ovation!
  3. Hugo wins for Best Visual Effects. And a bunch of other awards too, but this category generated the most tweets.
  4. Meryl Streep wins Best Actress for The Iron Lady. This is a bit of surprise, as many expected Viola Davis to win this category. Regardless, Meryl is lovely and thanks her hairdresser.
  5. The Artist wins Best Picture. No surprise whatsoever here. And everyone loves Uggie the dog.
  6. Zach Galifianakis and Will Ferrell present Best Original Song award to Bret McKenzie for The Muppets. Bret’s work in Flight of the Conchords makes him popular on Twitter. Not to mention, Zach and Will are pretty funny guys.
  7. Christopher Plummer wins Best Supporting Actor. At 82, he’s only two years younger than the Oscars themselves.
  8. Jennifer Lopez and her possible wardrobe malfunction. Was that a shadow or something else? Twitter seems to think it was not a shadow.
  9. Jean Dujardin wins Best Actor for The Artist. Another unsurprising win. Jean seems tickled to have won, and thanks the audience in French during his speech.
  10. Angelina Jolie presents Best Adapted Screenplay to The Descendants. Angie’s provocative pose and its subsequent imitation by Jim Rash (another Twitter favorite because of his role on Community) got a big laugh.

During the three-hour awards show, we tracked 2.05 million tweets about the Oscars, with the biggest spike at 18,718 tweets in one minute (during the Cirque du Soleil performance). These numbers are up quite a bit from last year, when the 2011 Oscars garnered 1.27 million tweets and a maximum spike of 11,780 tweets per minute.

The nominees with the most Twitter mentions during the show were:

  1. Meryl Streep – 74,793 tweets
  2. Octavia Spencer – 59,957
  3. Christopher Plummer – 41,107
  4. Jean Dujardin – 23,614
  5. Rooney Mara – 23,233
  6. Brad Pitt – 18,702
  7. Viola Davis – 17,651
  8. Woody Allen – 14,280
  9. George Clooney – 13,252
  10. Martin Scorsese – 11,328

The top three films nominated for Best Picture, by tweet volume:

  1. Hugo – 110,179 tweets
  2. The Artist – 78,509
  3. The Help – 23,585

For more information about our interactive explorer, read this blog post about how and what we tracked.

Written by Jenn D

February 26th, 2012 at 9:09 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

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Snowmobiles, snowboards and skis: A recap of tweets about Winter X Games 2012

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Last weekend, we worked with ESPN to track tweets about the 2012 Winter X Games in Aspen, Colorado, held January 26 through January 29, 2012. It was a big event, accumulating 171,373 tweets over the four days of competition!

During last summer’s X Games, we tracked 188K tweets from 97K contributors, for an overall reach of 37.7 million. This year’s Winter X Games generated 171K tweets from 100K contributors and an overall reach of 37.9 million. Two days into these games, here were the stats:

Sadly, freeskier and X Games gold medalist Sarah Burke died a week before the games. ESPN aired a tribute for Sarah on Thursday night and the #CelebrateSarah hashtag was used in more than 3,500 tweets during the games.

Sunday, January 29, was a big day for the games, featuring the final competitions for two fan favorites – the Snowmobile Best Trick and Men’s Snowboard Superpipe. Athletes like Heath Frisby, Shaun White, and Justin Hoyer generated a lot of Twitter buzz, and Heath’s first-ever snowmobile front flip resulted in the highest tweet spike of the entire games (1,634 tweets per minute).

By the end of the Winter X Games, the most retweeted tweet was from @espn and referred to snowboarder Shaun White’s perfect score in the Snowboard Superpipe Final. It got 1,428 retweets and generated 3.3 million impressions.

It was a great four days! We’re already looking forward to next year.

Written by Jenn D

February 1st, 2012 at 3:25 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

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TweetReach is going to the Golden Globes

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We’re very excited to announce that we’re partnering with mhCarter Consulting and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association to track tweets about the 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards on Sunday, January 15, 2012.

Jenn will be tweeting live from the event in Los Angeles on Sunday, and we’ll post the final Twitter analysis here on our blog next week.

Last year, we tracked tweets about the 2011 Golden Globe Awards. Glee dominated Twitter during last year’s show, generating the most retweets and highest spikes in conversation volume throughout the event. Other popular topics included The Social Network, Toy Story 3, The Big Bang Theory, Natalie Portman and Justin Bieber. Overall, we tracked 300,000 tweets with a reach of 31.5 million during the three-hour broadcast in 2011. The 2012 show is already on track to be much bigger.

The 68th Golden Globes were a lot of fun last year and we can’t wait to see what people will be tweeting about this year. Our early bets? Ricky Gervais will certainly cause a stir as the show’s host; he’s already generating a lot of buzz and averaging more than 300 retweets per tweet. Ryan Gosling has been the subject of hundreds of Tumblrs during the past few months and is nominated in two categories, so he’ll probably garner some attention at the event. Glee will likely make a strong showing again this year, as Twitter historically loves Glee and other shows targeted to a young adult audience. What do you think? Got any predictions for popular Twitter trends during this year’s Golden Globes telecast?

Read our full press release here.

Written by Jenn D

January 11th, 2012 at 8:35 am

Posted in Trends

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Analysis of tweets during Apple’s “Let’s Talk iPhone” announcement

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Today, Apple held a 90-minute event announcing their new iPhone and operating system upgrades. We tracked 319K tweets about the iPhone event, generating a reach of 40.3 million and 522 million impressions, from more than 175K different Twitter accounts.

Here’s a quick graph of tweet traffic during the iPhone event (graph times are in CDT). The first big spike hit 11,200 tweets per minute (tpm) at the announcement of iOS 5 coming to devices on October 12. The second major spike happened when the new iPhone 4S was officially announced, hitting 13,000 tweets per minute. During the 90-minute presentation, tweet volume was sustained well above 4,000 tpm. That’s pretty huge, if you’re wondering.

The most retweeted tweets were typically sarcastic comments about the new phone or detailed updates from the event. Here are the top two tweets in terms of retweets (with 845 and 786 retweets, respectively).

Overall, the accounts that generated the most exposure were news and media accounts live-tweeting the event and sharing updates from the presentation, including @mashable, @TIME, and @nytimes.

Finally, here’s overall tweet activity for the entire day of October 4. 148,205 tweets were posted during the first hour (10:00 a.m. PDT) of the “Let’s Talk iPhone” event. 

Written by Jenn D

October 4th, 2011 at 12:37 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

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