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The Week in Social Analytics #103

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The 2014 Social Media Marketing Industry Report from Social Media Examiner came out this week, and while you should definitely take the time to read the whole thing if you can, there are also a lot of great pieces highlighting different aspects of the findings:

How the Older Generation is Embracing Social Media | Infographic [from Social Times; written by Christie Barakat]

“Did you know that one in five Twitter users are over the age of fifty? Or that of the 53 percent of
of Americans 65 and older who use the Internet, 77 percent of them are active on a typical day?

What’s more, the older generation has the most spending power of any age group and accounts for 80 percent of all online luxury travel spending. Baby boomers also contribute 43 percent of America’s philanthropic activity.”

Click through for the full infographic.

Three Key Elements in Building Your Brand Through Social Media [from Social Media Today; written by Andrew Hutchinson]

“It’s not enough to broadcast your message anymore, you need to be able to establish trust, your place in their day to day lives. How does your brand help and improve your consumer’s world? What ways can your business contribute? Answering these questions are the first steps towards working out how you can use social media to achieve them.”

Facts Tell, Stories Sell – How Infotainment Inspires Action in B2B Marketing [from Top Rank Online Marketing; written by Lee Odden]

Stories aren’t just for B2C; check out these examples of creativity in connecting in the B2B market from Lee Odden, as well as a full ebook from other B2B marketers.

How to Spot Good Social Media Marketing Research [from Social Media Today; written by Chris Syme]

“Dr. Freberg also has some tips for marketers on how to wade through the large volume of data labeled “study” on the internet.

Always look at the data itself, the sample and method in which the data was collected, and whether or not the results match up with the question posed for the actual research and the method being used. A lot of times, there are some methods and statistics that do not match up with the results. In some cases, there are research studies that try to “spin” the results to make these big conclusions when in reality, the data does not reflect on this.

If the study does go into detail on how the research was collected and is transparent with the methods and audience they used, that is a good sign. However, there are a lot of studies that don’t give readers any clue about sample size, audience numbers, how the data was collected, or what questions were asked. Having a solid base and understanding in traditional research methods to explore, critique, and analyze the results yourself is critical to know as a social media marketer now to determine what is good research versus promoted research.

How Instagram Became the Best Crisis PR [from New York Magazine; written by Maureen O'connor]

“Modern celebrity relies on the illusion of intimacy, and Instagram PR is the ultimate tool for pseudo-intimate fan management: It emphasizes the celebrity’s direct connection with her fans (illusion) without forcing her to reveal any facts (reality). It feels more genuine than a press release, but still allows for meticulous image control.”

How to get strangers to retweet your tweets [from Wired UK; written by Olivia Solon]

“The team found that when it sent local information tweets to individuals identified by the algorithm, 13.3 percent retweeted it, compared to just 2.8 percent of people picked at random. This was improved to 19.3 percent (a 680 percent increase) when they timed the RT request to match the periods when people had been most active in the past.”

Read the full study here.

Written by Sarah

May 23rd, 2014 at 8:46 am