TweetReach Blog

Archive for the ‘conference’ tag

7 tips to maximize your conference attendance using Twitter

with one comment

We’ve covered how you can maximize using Twitter during your conference as a host– now what about as an attendee? Here are some quick tips to maximize your conference experience via Twitter:

The basics:

  • Learn the official event hashtag & double-check that you’re typing it correctly: seems simple enough, but you’ll miss out on a lot of connection and engagement with a typo
  • Make sure you’re following the host’s official account (or accounts): check periodically to see if there have been any changes in the scheduling, location of panels or smaller events, or any other breaking conference news
  • Advanced move? Research food places (and coffeeshops; even bars with good happy hours!) near the conference location, and follow some of them on Twitter. You might score a discount with a Twitter coupon, or at least have a place to invite follow attendees around sessions!

What you’re saying:

  • Quoting someone? Cite it as the speaker or an audience member, and tag it with their Twitter handle, if you have the information handy
  • Keep it short and sweet: you’ll be more likely to be retweeted if you keep your character count low, and other conference goers don’t have to trim your tweet down to add their own thoughts before retweeting
  • Share, follow back, add your thoughts– don’t just lurk in the conference hashtag streams! This is how you strike up conversations and form relationships with fellow attendees
  • Turn online interactions into offline: notice you keep tweeting with the same people? Meet up for lunch, coffee or happy hour to take your conference networking offline

Got something we missed? Share it in the comments. And we’ll see you at #SXSWi 2013!

Photo credit: Scott Beale/Laughing Squid at laughingsquid.com

Written by Sarah

February 12th, 2013 at 11:44 am

Posted in Guides

Tagged with , , , ,

Union Metrics SXSW 2013 panels

without comments

The team here at Union Metrics proposed a number of great panels for next year’s South By Southwest conference. They’re all listed below. If you think any of these would be interesting presentations at SXSW, please give us a vote!

Getting started with social data at scale

Featuring these speakers:

  • Ken Little, Director of Engineering, Tumblr
  • Rob Johnson, VP of Product Strategy, Gnip
  • Hayes Davis, CEO, Union Metrics

Answering these questions:

  1. What social networks offer access to social data and how do they provide that access?
  2. What issues should you be aware of in order to maintain compliance with the Terms of Service from different providers?
  3. What are the technical challenges inherent in consuming, storing and analyzing large amounts of social data?
  4. While social data is often treated as the answer to all kinds of marketing and branding questions, it does have plenty of limitations. What are some useful business questions social data can answer?
  5. What tools and techniques are available to get started analyzing social data?

The art & science of social media movie marketing

Featuring these speakers:

Answering these questions:

  1. Why do fans share film-related content online?
  2. What are studios and networks doing to engage their audiences in and out of the theater?
  3. What marketing tactics work best to market a movie on Facebook? On Twitter?
  4. What social media metrics are the most important to measure during a film release?
  5. Can social media predict a film’s success at the box office?

On Tumblr: Case studies, best practices, analytics

Featuring these speakers:

Answering these questions:

  1. What are examples of successful brands on Tumblr?
  2. What are examples of clever Tumblr campaigns and strategies?
  3. How is the community on Tumblr different from Twitter and Facebook?
  4. What kind of content resonates on Tumblr?
  5. How can you measure a Tumblr campaign? What metrics matter?

Designing for sales

Featuring these speakers:

Answering these questions:

  1. How do you balance company and product information on your home page versus a clean, simple design to drive more conversions?
  2. By the time users make it to your Plans and Pricing page, they should have a basic understanding of your offering. What are some best practice examples of Plans & Pricing pages that convert?
  3. How can data and infographics be used to tell simple stories that encourage users to act?
  4. Are you ever done iterating? How do you avoid analysis paralysis and start implementing and testing quickly and continually?
  5. Everyone has an opinion and sales, marketing, and design all want to make sure their ideas are incorporated into the final product. What are some tips for avoiding design by committee?

Call Me SOA, maybe?

Featuring these speakers:

Answering these questions:

  1. Why do we care about service-oriented architectures? What are important concepts in a SOA?
  2. What are the advantages of using an SOA? What are the pitfalls?
  3. How do I know I need an SOA?
  4. How can we get started with SOA today?
  5. What are some awesome SOA technologies?

How Twitter has changed how we watch TV

Featuring this speaker:

Answering these questions:

  1. What is social television?
  2. How has Twitter changed how we watch TV?
  3. What are some examples of effective TV-related Twitter campaigns? What shows are doing the best (and the worst) on Twitter?
  4. What role do second screen apps play in TV viewing?
  5. What are some predictions for the future of Twitter and TV?

Written by admin

August 15th, 2012 at 10:49 am

Posted in News

Tagged with , ,

16 ways to use Twitter to improve your next conference

with 8 comments

Twitter is the perfect social channel for conferences. It provides a real-time, public and searchable record of tweets about a conference that organizers, speakers and attendees can follow. Twitter even allows people who can’t attend in person to read along as conference events unfold. And Twitter gives conference planners an archive of participant comments, as well as measurable data they can report back to sponsors.

If you’re a conference organizer or producer, here are a few things you can do to make sure you’re getting the most out of Twitter during your next event.

Using an official conference hashtag

  1. Select a unique official hashtag. Make sure no other events are using this hashtag and that it’s separate from general topical conversation. Keep it short and easy to remember. A good conference hashtag will include the conference name or abbreviation, and sometimes the year or location. If you can, avoid using underscores or other punctuation in your hashtag to keep it simple (and to be sure the hashtag works in every Twitter client). Some we like include #BWENY (BlogWorld Expo) and #ica12 (International Communication Association).
  2. Communicate the official hashtag. Try to make the official hashtag easy to find. Post the official conference hashtag on presentation slides, as well as signs and posters around the conference venue, list it on the conference website, and use it in official tweets from your own and other organizers’ Twitter accounts. Encourage speakers and sponsors to use the hashtag.
  3. Track mentions of the official and unofficial hashtags. In addition to the main official hashtag, attendees may adopt track- or interest group-specific hashtags or mistakenly use an incorrect hashtag. Try to keep track of all relevant hashtags, even if they’re not officially endorsed.

Surfacing interesting conference topics

  1. Follow conversation as it unfolds. Keep track of attendee tweets about the conference, both to monitor conversation during the event, as well to create an archive for future access. It’s very simple to follow the use of a hashtag in real time with any number of Twitter clients and applications, so pick your favorite. If you want to share these tweets, consider displaying them live on a monitor at the conference or on the conference website.
  2. Pay attention to retweets. Use retweet counts to keep track of which tweets are getting the most traction on Twitter. What speakers, presentations, or topics are being retweeted? You can use this information to make your next conference even better.
  3. Use official handle to ask questions. Twitter is great for real-time interactions, so use the official conference account to ask attendees how things are going. Get live feedback on presentations, the venue, conference logistics and more.
  4. Find problems quickly. Monitor conversation about the conference throughout to detect problems. Is the wifi not working? Are participants unable to find certain rooms? If something is going wrong and you’re actively monitoring conference tweets, you can fix small problems before they become big problems.

Sharing important conference content

  1. Use official handle to post announcements and schedule changes. Give participants a central and reliable channel on Twitter where they can access important conference information. If there are any important announcements or changes to the conference schedule, post them to the official Twitter account so attendees can find and share them.
  2. Distribute speaker slides. Use Twitter to make it easy for attendees to find speakers’ presentation slides. Encourage speakers to share their slides through their own Twitter accounts, and retweet those slides from the official account. Also share links back to the conference website where participants can access and download conference slides and other documents.
  3. Answer attendee questions. Throughout the conference, use Twitter to answer audience questions, direct attendees to the appropriate resources and make sure everyone is getting the most out of the event.

Tracking audience engagement

  1. Measure total Twitter audience size. With the spread of conference content on social media like Twitter, the size of the audience can grow well beyond the number of attendees physically present. Measure the total reach and exposure for conference tweets, as well as the number of total tweets and unique contributors.
  2. Determine popular speakers and presentations. Analyze conference Twitter engagement by tracking metrics like retweets, replies, favorites and impressions to learn which topics are generating buzz. Search for speaker and panel names, presentation topics and track titles to see which ones are most talked about. Find out which images are being shared the most to determine attendees’ favorite moments, and track shared URLs to see which websites and pages have been most useful to participants.
  3. Share metrics with sponsors. Report this information back to conference sponsors to demonstrate the value of their sponsorship. Showing sponsors how many more people their brands reached beyond in-person conference attendance can be very valuable to securing future sponsorships. When possible, share specific examples of effective tweets about or from conference sponsors.

Gathering feedback for your next conference

  1. Tweet links to conference feedback survey. In addition to sending a post-conference email asking attendees for feedback, also post a link to the feedback survey on the official Twitter account. Some attendees may be more likely to respond on Twitter, so this gives them another opportunity to respond.
  2. Compare this conference to other events. How did this conference compare to recent or related conferences? If you have Twitter metrics for previous years’ conferences or other similar conferences in your industry, use them to see how this year’s event measured up. Look specifically for changes in engagement and participation, as well as reach and exposure. If this event’s metrics were lower, try to figure out why and how you can improve next time. If they were higher, that’s great, but try to learn more about why your numbers were up.
  3. Analyze qualitative tweet content. In addition to quantitative audience and engagement metrics, tweets are a great source of qualitative data about the conference. Read through a tweet transcript after the event is over to see what attendees liked and didn’t like. Mine this transcript for any feedback you can use to improve for next time. In some cases, an in-depth content or sentiment analysis might be useful.

Photo credit: Scott Beale/Laughing Squid at laughingsquid.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Interested in learning more about TweetReach? Take a look at our website or contact our sales team for more.

Written by Jenn D

June 4th, 2012 at 3:56 pm

Posted in Guides

Tagged with , ,

Analysis of tweets during Apple’s “Let’s Talk iPhone” announcement

without comments

Today, Apple held a 90-minute event announcing their new iPhone and operating system upgrades. We tracked 319K tweets about the iPhone event, generating a reach of 40.3 million and 522 million impressions, from more than 175K different Twitter accounts.

Here’s a quick graph of tweet traffic during the iPhone event (graph times are in CDT). The first big spike hit 11,200 tweets per minute (tpm) at the announcement of iOS 5 coming to devices on October 12. The second major spike happened when the new iPhone 4S was officially announced, hitting 13,000 tweets per minute. During the 90-minute presentation, tweet volume was sustained well above 4,000 tpm. That’s pretty huge, if you’re wondering.

The most retweeted tweets were typically sarcastic comments about the new phone or detailed updates from the event. Here are the top two tweets in terms of retweets (with 845 and 786 retweets, respectively).

Overall, the accounts that generated the most exposure were news and media accounts live-tweeting the event and sharing updates from the presentation, including @mashable, @TIME, and @nytimes.

Finally, here’s overall tweet activity for the entire day of October 4. 148,205 tweets were posted during the first hour (10:00 a.m. PDT) of the “Let’s Talk iPhone” event. 

Written by Jenn D

October 4th, 2011 at 12:37 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

Tagged with , , ,

A recap of SXSWi 2011 in tweets

with one comment

The TweetReach team attended the South by Southwest Interactive conference in Austin, Texas this week. SXSWi is a great big gathering of all kinds of interactive professionals – from social media folks to software developers and startup founders, to designers, researchers and basically anyone interested in the digital space. This year’s SXSWi conference attracted 19,364 attendees (nearly a 36% increase from 2010).

During the conference, we monitored tweets that mentioned SXSW. During the five days of the interactive conference, we tracked:

  • 626,513 tweets from
  • 172,432 contributors with a
  • reach of 56,868,452 that generated
  • 2.2 billion impressions.

The most retweeted tweet during the conference was from @SteveCase and received 1,523 retweets.

We’re still crunching the rest of the numbers, so we’ll have more in-depth analysis of SXSWi tweets and what people were talking about very soon. Stay tuned.

Written by Jenn D

March 16th, 2011 at 1:58 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

Tagged with , , ,

So, did Apple and Verizon overshadow CES? Oh yes.

with 3 comments

For months – even years – people have been speculating about when the iPhone would be available on Verizon. Today, we finally learned that the Verizon iPhone will officially go on sale in February.

We’ve been tracking tweets about the Verizon iPhone for a while. And it just so happens that we also tracked tweets about CES. So, how do these two events compare? Did the Verizon iPhone announcement really overshadow CES, at least as far as the tweets are concerned? Let’s see.

Here’s the tweet volume for January 11 (times displayed in PST):

Verizon iPhone tweets peaked at more than 56,000 in one hour. As a comparison, the highest number of tweets per hour about CES was 9,641. In one week, 136 thousand people tweeted 443 thousand times about CES. In less than one day, 114 thousand people tweeted 199 thousand times about the Verizon iPhone. Tweets about CES reached 42 million people in a week; tweets about Verizon iPhone reached 33 million people in a day.

Over the past few weeks, speculation about the Verizon iPhone really heated up. Many people thought the announcement would come at this year’s CES event. Others joked that Apple, who didn’t attend CES, was intentionally waiting to announce the partnership, in order to overshadow CES. And then last Friday, January 7, we learned of a Verizon press event scheduled for Tuesday, January 11, just two days after CES ended. The Wall Street Journal confirmed that the Verizon Apple partnership would be announced at this event. People got very excited. On that day alone, our TweetReach Tracker monitored more than 45,000 tweets about the Verizon iPhone, with a reach of 19.3 million unique Twitter accounts.

Given how many anticipatory tweets we tracked, we were very excited to see the tweets on the actual day of the official announcement from Verizon. The announcement was scheduled for 11 a.m. ET/8:00 a.m. PT on January 11, 2011. During the announcement hour, tweets about the Verizon iPhone spiked, as people posted updates from the announcement and their opinions on the news. In just that one hour, we tracked 56,303 tweets from 39,275 different users, reaching 21,576,495 unique Twitter accounts.

What this tells us is that Apple can basically do in one day what 2,700 other tech companies did in an entire week at CES. No wonder Apple is the world’s second most valuable company.

Written by Jenn D

January 11th, 2011 at 7:13 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

Tagged with , , , ,

Tech blogs rule CES. Tech brands don’t.

with 4 comments

Last week, we tracked tweets about CES, the Consumer Electronics Show, which ran from January 6 – January 9 in Las Vegas, Nevada. More than 140,000 people from around the world attended this enormous technology and electronics event.

And when we say enormous, we really do mean enormous. We used the TweetReach Tracker to monitor tweets for one week around CES (the two days leading up to the event, the four days of the event, and the day after the event). And during that week, we tracked:

443,290 tweets
from 136,738 contributors

generating 1,112,409,883 impressions
reaching 42,200,045 people

That’s more than 1.1 billion impressions delivered to a potential unique audience of more than 42 million people. Nearly half a million tweets were posted about CES, from more than 135 thousand different Twitter accounts. That’s pretty enormous.

The number of tweets about CES reached a high point on January 7, the second day of the event, resulting in more than 130,000 tweets posted that day.

During the main hours of the event on January 7 (from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. PST), an average of 7,162 tweets were posted every hour, with a maximum of 8,429 between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. During the four days of the trade show, an average of 3,700 tweets were posted every hour, with generally higher volumes in the afternoons.

We expected to see a lot of tweets from – and retweets of – major tech and electronics brands. And while there were definitely plenty of tweets about CES from accounts like @BlackBerry (and @BlackBerryHelp), @SamsungTweets, @kodakCB, and @Sony, most high-impact tweets came from other sources. The most influential contributors in this Tracker were mostly mainstream media outlets, tech blogs, and geeky celebrities, with only a couple tech companies making a big impact. Here’s a list of the top 12 most influential contributors to the CES Tracker. These 12 accounts contributed the top 50 tweets by overall exposure (our impressions metric) and accounted for 148 million of those 1.1 billion total impressions.

This was definitely one of the biggest events we’ve ever tracked tweets about, especially in terms of overall impressions generated. We’re curious what will top it. Maybe the Academy Awards? Guess we’ll see next month.

PS – If you’re interested in how we calculate reach, exposure and our metrics, we explain it all here. Also, we’ve been tracking tweets about the Verizon iPhone and wrote up an analysis of those tweets here. If you think this CES data is impressive, check out the iPhone data.

Written by Jenn D

January 10th, 2011 at 10:00 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

Tagged with , , ,

Can’t touch this: TechCrunch Disrupt hammers out 50MM Twitter impressions in 2 days, but….

with one comment

This week’s TechCrunch Disrupt conference has been quite a show. In fact, since the conference started Monday in San Francisco, TechCrunch Disrupt has seen total audience exposure of nearly 50 million impressions on Twitter (more about how we calculate impressions here). It certainly helps when there’s rumor followed by significant acquisition news (signed on stage, no less) with a dose of Hammer Time thrown in. Tweets from MCHammer himself, Om Malik, Robert Scoble, and Steve Case don’t hurt either.

This data comes from a TweetReach Tracker. The TweetReach Tracker is a new, real-time analytics feature we’re rolling out to Pro subscribers. This is a sneak peak – expect a larger announcement soon.

Upon closer review, the numbers reveal people were incredibly engaged and conversive around TechCrunch Disrupt, and absolutely told their followers – tweeting, retweeting and @replying over and over again. The 50 million in total exposure came from 3,300 Twitter users who tweeted over 10,000 times about the conference. In fact, 42% of the audience saw TechCrunch Disrupt-related messages SEVEN times or more. Talk about Hammer Time.  Just 18% saw a message once. Ultimately, since Monday, TechCrunch Disrupt has reached 5.7 million UNIQUE Twitter users.

By comparison, mid-September’s DEMO Conference saw total audience exposure of over 7 million with 1.1 million unique Twitter users were reached – all this from 3,700 tweets by 800 contributors. Yet TweetReach Tracker data shows the core DEMO audience was far less engaged or conversational: 58% of the audience saw a DemoCon tweet just once, while 20% saw a DEMO-related message more than seven times.

So what does this mean? While the TechCrunch Disrupt and DEMO ratios are roughly the same – and frankly, what you’d expect for these types of conferences – there seemed to be significantly more engagement by the TechCrunch Disrupt crowd. The same people saw tweets, retweets and @replies over and over again. But at some point, does this become annoying? If it’s a typical brand message, it probably does. If it’s a conference with breaking news and new technology being announced, perhaps not so much.

What do you think? Annoying or informative?

Written by Dean Cruse

September 29th, 2010 at 5:18 pm

Posted in Trends

Tagged with , , ,