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Super Bowl XLVIII: Brands on Twitter

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On Friday we took a look at all the brand chatter on Twitter leading up to last night’s blowout Super Bowl game between the Seattle Seahawks and the Denver Broncos. The lack of action on the field turned a lot of faces toward their second screen instead, and made for some entertaining brand interactions (Marketing Land catalogued some of them).

Here’s a second look at the brands we examined on Friday- this time for activity on game day alone- and the answer to the eternal question “Is SodaStream still making Coke and Pepsi say #sorry?”

Budweiser

Budweiser’s #UpForWhatever hashtag saw 7k tweets from 6k contributors with an overall reach of 14.6 million; about 5x the activity they saw leading up to the big game. The most retweeted tweet was again from Bud Light and featured Arnold Schwarzenegger:

This tweet has seen 600 RTs so far.

Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola saw 49.4k tweets on big game day, from 41.4k Twitter users for a total reach of 32.5 million, just over three times the activity from their game day lead-up conversations. The most retweeted tweet was from the official Coke account and included their #AmericaIsBeautiful campaign hashtag and was retweeted over 5k times so far:

Doritos

Doritos aired the two winning commercials from their Crash the Super Bowl contest last night, and each saw some activity around around their respective hashtags- #TimeMachine and #CowboyKid- and the whole conversation around Doritos, including their campaign hashtag #ForTheBold, saw 16.7k tweets from 15.1k contributors for an overall reach of 14.6 million. That’s about six times the activity we saw in their game day lead-up.

The most retweeted tweet around the Doritos conversation with the #Doritos hashtag came from their official account, congratulating the Seahawks on their win:

It has seen 94 retweets so far.

Kia

The conversation around Kia last night didn’t change much from their lead-up: 1.4k tweets from 1.2k contributors, for an overall reach of 3.2 million. The most retweeted tweet actually came from some entertaining brand interaction from Xbox, based on Kia’s Matrix-themed commercial:

This tweet was part of a back-and-forth conversation from the brands, and has earned a total of 276 retweets so far.

SodaStream

SodaStream has the most activity around its name by far in the lead-up conversations we looked at last week, but yesterday saw much lower activity numbers for them: 6.6k tweets from 4.9k contributors, for a total reach of 16.4 million. It seems a little brand controversy will get you talked about leading up to an event, but not necessarily boost the conversation once the event takes place.

One of the most retweet tweets featuring their hashtag #SorryCokeAndPepsi came from the official SodaStream account, and referred to their celebrity spokesperson Scarlett Johansson:

It has seen just 23 retweets so far.

Toyota

Terry Crews and The Muppets teamed up for Toyota’s #NoRoomForBoring ad last night, and the conversation around Toyota saw a little boost in activity, if a drop in reach, from their lead-up: 12.4k tweets from 10.2k contributors, for a total reach of 14.3 million.

One of the most retweeted tweets came from the official Muppets account, and featured King Prawn Pepe doing a touchdown dance on Vine:

311 retweets for the dancing King Prawn so far, and some decent crossover exposure for Toyota.

What about brands who didn’t buy ad time?

A lot of brands who don’t buy ad time still live-tweet during big cultural events to interact with viewers and other brands; last night saw a lot of discussion between brands, riffing on the commercials and more. A standout was definitely J.C. Penney, who decided to tweet in a pair of mittens to very mixed results. The numbers, however, are in their favor: 131k tweets from 81.2k contributors, for a total reach of 36.9 million. That’s slightly more reach than Coke, who usurped SodaStream on game day, but more than twice the amount of activity.

Both of their slightly incoherent tweets saw around 20k retweets:

22.7k retweets so far.

19.2k retweets so far.

A number of other brands- even some of the big game advertisers- interacted with J.C. Penney’s tweets:

Coors Light jumped in first, getting some exposure- 7.1k retweets- on a night dominated by their competitor Bud Light.

Kia’s tweet has seen 3.1k retweets so far, while Snickers and Doritos both offered themselves as snacks to soak up any extraneous Coors Light:

Snickers has gotten 3.1k retweets so far, and Doritos 1.3k.

The Takeaways

We are living in the real-time marketing present, it would seem. The brands who saw the most activity and reach last night were the ones who were interacting like people do on Twitter around big cultural events, and inserting their brand in ways that were funny and relevant. J.C. Penney may have confused a lot of people with their decision to tweet in mittens, but it definitely got everyone talking about them. It remains to be seen whether it will help them sell any more mittens.

Watching brands interact during events like the Super Bowl has become an unexpected highlight for many viewers, especially when the action happens to be slow on the main screen.

What was your favorite social moment of the big game last night?

Written by Sarah

February 3rd, 2014 at 8:31 am

#CES2014: Brands are back in the big picture

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We took an early look at the #CES2014 tweets last week, and now we’re back to give you the bigger picture of everything that happened in Vegas (it doesn’t stay there if you put it on Twitter, and especially if you hashtag it).

From the lead up to the show- we started tracking on January 5th and the show officially began on the 7th- until it ended on January 10th, there were 457.2k tweets made by 163.8k contributors, reaching 170 million people. The first official day saw the biggest spike in tweets: 119.6k, beating out the previous day’s just-under-100k. That’s an average of just under 5k tweets an hour.

The most retweeted tweet was posted on the first day of CES, from PlayStation, and saw over 5k retweets and 141 replies:

The rest of the most retweeted tweets were from other brands and an agency, with one or two independent reporters in the mix:

1. @intel

2. @cmithun (Campbell Mithun, agency)

3. @chippy (Chippy, tech writer)

4. @Windows

5. @AccentureComms

6. @byandreachang (Andrea Chang, tech writer)

7. @Logitech

8. @Audi

9. @WWE

10. @BMWi

This is a departure from the past, when CES was ruled by tech bloggers rather than brands. Since 2011, however, more brands have fully embraced social media and in-depth social strategy, joining the conversation that was already happening around them. Their increased presence in the conversation- especially their ability to direct it- shows the results this investment has brought. Brands aren’t just responding to various levels of coverage from tech bloggers, they’re creating, participating in, and growing the conversation themselves.

That is a powerful presence to have at the biggest consumer electronics show in the world.

This isn’t just in terms of retweets either; the top contributors to the overall CES conversation also included brands:

1. Endgadget

2. Microsoft

3. Mashable

4. CNET

5. Intel

6. WSJ

7. YouTube

8. SamsungMobile

9. WWE

10. intlCES

That’s four brands in the top ten contributors when three years ago there was only one. Based on this activity, influence from brands can only be expected to grow in the coming years.

Want help tracking tweets about your next conference or event? Let us know!

Written by Sarah

January 13th, 2014 at 1:20 pm

Posted in Events

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Marketing the end of the world

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The world may be ending tomorrow, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get a good deal out of it.

On Friday December 21st, the Mayan Long Count Calendar completes a cycle (a b’ak’tun, if you want to get technical about it) which doomsday-ers decided means the end of the world, and naturally everyone is talking about it on Twitter:

If you’ve decided putting off your holiday shopping over this was a bad idea, fear not– the deals are as varied as the doomsday prophecies. Toyo Tires is giving away prizes on their Facebook page to those who are betting the world isn’t really going to come to an end:

A countdown clock is placed beneath this Mayan-themed add, similar to the one on JetBrains’s page offering 75% off of their products (the world might not end, but this deal will!).

There are many more, and probably some we’ve missed: Lonely Planet has travel tips and a gentle nudge to buy their travel guide at the end of them,  the San Francisco Bulls are having an End-of-the-World-themed game Friday night, Old Spice released an 8-bit style game centered on saving the world, and T.G.I. Friday’s invites you to spend your apocalypse with them at their Last Friday Party.

Jello has taken a more interactive approach on Twitter, using the hashtag #funpocalypse to go along with its campaign of offering up a delicious sacrifice of Jello pudding to appease the Mayan gods and avert the apocalypse. Jello has asked Twitter followers to tweet at them what they would do from their bucket list before the world ends, and is giving away $100 to participants to accomplish the task.

Over 7 days of steadily climbing activity on this hashtag, Jello has reached 572,363 accounts, generating 718, 420 impressions. It’s a great hook for the brand right before the holidays, when many potential customers will be planning out their holiday menus, and might now be inspired to add a good old-fashioned Jello mold to the mix.

Another end-of-the-world campaign with a lot of chatter on Twitter is OkCupid’s email asking users of the dating site if they want to “die alone” and prompting them to log in to find a date for the apocalypse:

OkC users met this email with a mix of indignation and humor on Twitter- some called it dark while others made cat jokes- with tweets reaching 168,004 accounts, for a total of 188,890 impressions. Considering the email went out Wednesday evening and this report was run Thursday morning, that’s a lot of quick exposure for the brand, without even employing the use of a dedicated hashtag to prompt discussion.

One tweet from user @josephbirdsong garnered the most exposure, retweets and mentions:


One clever, themed email to users resulted in 26% of the impressions of Jello’s week-long campaign, thanks mostly to one tweet about it from a single user. Identifying social influencers like that is a big key for brands, especially when an email campaign is kept separate from social media; in fact OkC doesn’t seem to use Twitter very much, tweeting only a few times a month. With the social response from this one campaign, they might want to pay more attention to what is being said about them and join in the conversation.

Unless we all turn to ash tomorrow, that is.

Written by Sarah

December 20th, 2012 at 10:49 am

Four steps to measure your brand’s share of voice on Twitter

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At TweetReach, we’re often asked about how to measure share of voice (SOV). Measuring share of voice involves comparing one brand’s metrics to the total conversation about that brand’s category. Historically, this has been a difficult exercise because high quality data is hard to come by. But Twitter is an abundant and accessible source of real conversational data, allowing us to easily track mentions across a variety of brands. You can now determine the size of conversation for an entire category and compare your own brand to the overall conversation.

You can measure share of voice for any set of similar topics - competitive brands, products, companies or people. You can even compare share of voice across political candidates. Political candidates are the perfect example for a share of voice comparison. There are usually several people in the race, with a few frontrunners and a few hangers-on, just like most any product or business category. And people are talking about them on Twitter, providing a remarkable dataset for analysis.

Earlier this year, we tracked tweets about the U.S. Republican presidential candidates (see our interactive visualization and analysis). Now that Mitt Romney has emerged as the presumptive GOP nominee, we’re tracking the candidates for the vice presidential slot on the Republican ticket. VP candidates are not elected separately, but we can still use Twitter to gauge popular opinion and awareness on these candidates. Plus, they make a great example for a blog post about share of voice.

So, here are four steps to using Twitter data to measure share of voice.

1. Decide who you want to compare.

Before you start measuring, you’ll need to determine which competitors to compare to your own brand. What are the brands that make up the category you’re interested in measuring? Pick two to ten to compare. It’s probably easy to pick out your one or two most direct competitors, but also consider other less obvious choices you should add, as well as any large brands that make up your category. It’s possible that what your customers perceive as related might not even be on your radar, so think about this carefully.

In our Republican vice presidential candidate tracking, picking who to track was not that difficult. There are a set of people who have publicly made some indication that they’re interested in the job, and others that analysts and others who pay attention to these kinds of matters think could be chosen. So after a little research, we narrowed our field of possible candidates to 10 people:

  1. Kelly Ayotte
  2. Jeb Bush
  3. Chris Christie
  4. Bobby Jindal
  5. Bob McDonnell
  6. Tim Pawlenty
  7. Rob Portman
  8. Marco Rubio
  9. Paul Ryan
  10. John Thune

There are probably a few others we could include (or remove), but this is a solid, representative list for our needs. However you choose, pick 2-10 related brands to monitor in addition to your own.

2. Set up appropriate keywords for tracking.

Next, you need to track comparable terms for all brands. Most Twitter measurement tools (TweetReach included) will require a set of queries or keywords to begin tracking tweets. In this step, your goal is to make sure that your metrics aren’t later impacted by a data quality issue. If you monitor one brand’s Twitter account, then monitor all brands’ Twitter accounts. You probably know all the keywords you’d want to track for your brand, so think as carefully about the others as you did your own. Are you using common misspellings or nicknames? Are there other languages to consider? Multiple official Twitter handles or hashtags?

In this GOP VP case, we’re tracking full names (“Marco Rubio”)  and Twitter handles (@marcorubio) for all candidates. We opted not to add last name-only keywords since candidates like Jeb Bush and Paul Ryan have fairly common last names and that would result in more noise than useful data. Since we can’t track their last names, we won’t track any other last names either. You can decide what makes sense given your goals, but just be consistent across all brands.

3. Collect enough data.

The next step is to start collecting data. Some tools do this in real time, and others have historical data you can mine. Either way, collect enough data that it’s representative of the full spectrum of conversation about your brands. Conversations can be spiky over short periods of time, so it’s best if you have weeks or preferably months to balance out those spikes across all brands. A longer data collection period also allows you to notice trends in SOV changes. The more data, the better. The longer you’ve been collecting data, the better. 

GOP VP candidates see jumps in Twitter mentions when they’re featured in the news or after a public appearance. Some will just see more total tweets over time. We want to track long enough that we can differentiate between a legitimately higher metric and a one-time spike. In our specific case, we’ve only been tracking these candidates since early May (so just over two weeks) and the data is still pretty immature. Some of the candidates have been added even more recently than that, so their data is newer still. This means we shouldn’t take any of these metrics too seriously yet. But they will improve over time, so when we check in next month, we’ll have a much more representative picture of the true conversation.

4. Compare several metrics.

Finally, it’s important to compare brands across several different metrics to truly understand what’s going on. You may have a favorite stat or a particular KPI you’re targeting, but try to compare a few different metrics before deciding which to use moving forward. One brand might have a high reach, while another could have a lot of tweets. Use several metrics to compare, to see where the patterns are and what metrics make most sense in your industry or category.

Let’s look at a few metrics for the current top three Republican VP candidates (at least according to Twitter): Chris Christie, Marco Rubio, and Paul Ryan. This list will likely change as our data matures, but it’s fine for an early analysis.

One of our favorite metrics to start with is simple tweet volume. Tweet counts are useful in understanding the size of the conversation about a candidate. Below are graphs for both tweets per day and cumulative tweets so far this month for the three candidates.

You can see that Ryan (yellow) is slightly ahead of Christie (blue) in cumulative tweets right now, but both are increasing steadily. Christie has had two large spikes in daily tweet volume, while Ryan has had one. Both of these metrics will stabilize after a few more weeks, and we’ll have a clearer picture of who’s on top. Right now, I’d say Ryan has the slight edge on Christie, but it’s close.

And if we’re actually going to look at share of voice, let’s compare each candidate’s tweet volume to overall tweet total. In the past two weeks, there have been 46K total GOP VP candidate tweets. 35.2% of those mentioned Ryan, with Christie close behind at 32.9%. Track SOV over time, as changes in a brand’s share could indicate important perception shifts. For example, when we started tracking GOP presidential candidates in early January, Ron Paul dominated that conversation’s share of voice, and was mentioned in more than 40% of all tweets. But by April, that share had dropped off almost entirely, leaving the rest to Mitt Romney.

It’s also helpful to look at several metrics side-by-side. In this case, let’s compare reach, tweet volume and number of unique contributors.

Looking across these three metrics, Christie appears to be the frontrunner. His reach is currently more than 15 million, with 10 million for Rubio and 8 million for Ryan. Looking at reach and tweet volume in conjunction with contributors – the number of unique people talking about a candidate on Twitter – it seems like a lot of different people are talking about Christie and Ryan, while Rubio has a smaller group of vocal supporters. To achieve a 50% higher reach when compared to the other candidates, Christie was probably mentioned by a celebrity, typically the only people to have follower counts over a few million. (In this case, it turns out @jimmyfallon, who has 5.5 million followers, tweeted publicly to the governor.)

Reach is an excellent metric for share of voice, because it tells you about the size of the potential audience for a brand. The bigger the reach, the larger the variety of people who are spreading the message. A high reach indicates a diversity in contributors and audience, as well as some potentially influential and high-follower contributors.

We also recommend unique contributors as a share of voice metric. Which brand has more different people talking about it? One caveat about both reach and contributors is that since these are metrics based on counting uniques, you can’t compare one brand’s metric to an overall sum, since you can add up reach or contributor numbers to get overall reach or contributors. You can only compare reach to another brand’s reach. That’s still useful, but may not be a traditional share of voice metric.

Twitter and share of voice

Twitter is a incredibly rich source of share of voice data. If you’re tracking similar brands, products or people and one has an audience on Twitter, it’s likely they all will. Due to the real-time, public and archivable nature of Twitter, we can access this data for all kinds of useful analyses. People can and do talk about their favorite – and least favorite – brands on Twitter. For all these reasons, Twitter is perfect for SOV analysis, if you do it right. Doing share of voice right means selecting the appropriate brands to compare, ensuring consistency in search queries, aiming for long-lived data collection, and embracing diversity in data analysis.

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Interested in learning more about TweetReach? Take a look at our website or contact our sales team for more.

Written by Jenn D

May 21st, 2012 at 8:41 pm

Posted in Guides

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This Week in Social Analytics #23

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Hello again from This Week in Social Analytics, our ongoing summary of some of our favorite posts from the week in the world of measurement, analytics and social media. Enjoy!

How brands can turn the art of social media scientific
As she works with sports teams, leagues, athletes and corporate brands, Amy Martin of Digital Royalty combines what she calls cold (traditional) metrics and warm (social) metrics to track a measure of return on influence and discusses the direct correlation between it and revenue.

SEO Beats PPC & Social Media For Generating Leads
In a recent study of 500 U.S. online marketers by Webmarketing123, SEO is the number one source of leads for both B2C and B2B marketers, beating out both PPC and social media marketing. A handy infographic of the results can also be found here.

Stop the Social Puppetry for Klout and Other Influence Metrics!
In this widely retweeted post, Pam Moore discusses the recent changes to Klout’s algorithm for scoring online influence and argues that any measure of social influence should be viewed as just one of the numbers in the bag of measurement tools and metrics.

Written by Dean Cruse

November 5th, 2011 at 9:00 am

TakeFive with TweetReach – Sarah Reynolds

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Welcome back to TakeFive with TweetReach, our ongoing series where we discuss social media analytics and measurement with notable members of the community, pulling together insight and commentary on all things measurement. As always, we welcome your suggestions for interviewees and questions.

This week, we’re excited to talk with Sarah Reynolds, Senior Social Media Manager at ICED Media, an online strategy and marketing company in New York City. She’s also the voice behind @KmartFashion.

TweetReach: Welcome Sarah! Let’s start with talking about how you got started using social media. Can you describe you first “ah-ha” moment?

Sarah Reynolds: My first work experience in social media was very brand heavy with limited off topic conversation. My current position at ICED Media was my first foray in representing large, established brands. Now that I am part of an organization that has led non-traditional advertising for over ten years, I’ve learned how to apply my traditional background with my company’s expertise to establish a strong voice for a national brand that is both conversational and informative.

My first “ah ha” moment was when I realized I had humanized a brand. I had broken down the barrier between advertising and the consumer by infusing my content with my honest personality. Despite the size and reputation of the client I work with, I’ve made their online presence very personal and accessible. I’ve even been invited to meet some of my fans and followers in person! Social media often gets a doomsday type stigma — something along the lines of people will stop actually interacting in person, and instead, will only relay on handles, profiles, texting and chat boxes to keep in touch. I think my experience is a small example of the power of social media on human interaction and how it actually brings us closer. Since when did people want to become friends with a brand, or sit down and have coffee with a brand, or be interested in how they are feeling or what they are wearing? Social media can accomplish that if you insert some human touch and genuine traits that others can feel comfortable relating to.

TweetReach: Is ROI for Twitter campaigns achievable? There are many different ways to measure activity, but how do you gauge your success, or help your clients do the same? What’s missing from the equation?

Sarah Reynolds: Although ROI is possible via Twitter campaigns, all brands should be familiar with the quantitative and qualitative aspects of social media. Tracking a campaign’s reach and ROI are just as important as building a loyal follower base and engaging in impactful conversations. The job of an agency like ICED Media is to combine best in class tools and technologies with our ultimate objective of delivering the best results for our clients. Whether driving revenue is your ultimate goal, you should be always be monitoring reach and ROI. These measures are good proxies for determining the efficacy of your messages and how they relate to the number of responses, overall traffic, and conversions/sales. It’s important to keep an eye on all these moving parts to help analyze how your tweets are performing against certain metrics. I find that the timing, content and specificity of my tweets have a direct correlation to certain reach/ROI related metrics.

TweetReach: What’s your favorite example of a successful social media campaign? How important was measurement of the metrics around the campaign to its success?

Sarah Reynolds: We recently transformed one of our client’s Twitter handles into a personal concierge service during a heavily attended two week-long event in NYC. We provided a free delivery service for a select group of social media influencers in the fashion industry. When these users reached out to our client’s Twitter profile to request a delivery, our profile was exposed to all of their followers, reaching our targeted demographic. We tracked the reach and impressions based on our interactions with our concierge users, plus any organic requests that we received based on our initial engagement. This was a successful campaign because it provided a group of valuable influencers with a free service, leading to positive sentiments toward our client, and it reached a large group of qualified followers.

TweetReach: Where do you go for measurement and analytics-related news and insight — any particular website, blogs, forums, etc. that are of particular value?

Sarah Reynolds: Due to the flux of social media, it is important to stay up to date with as many blogs as possible, but personally I like to read www.adage.com for a general overview of advertising news and www.mashable.com for social media tools and best practices. The Twitter timeline has also become an excellent source for real-time information.

TweetReach: Do you have any secret techniques, tools, or other Jedi strategies that you can share with our readers? Any best practices for getting greater reach for your content?

Sarah Reynolds: The industry is too new for Jedi strategies — Yoda does not exist in the space yet; social media is the Wild West right now. So no Jedi tricks per se, but certainly some suggestions of things I’ve discovered. First, start by exploring your direct competitors’ profiles to gain insight on what type of content works vs. content that seems forced/too branded. Then, outline your goals for each platform, regardless of whether you aim to drive ROI, create a brand personality, or to simply provide customer service. Once you have an idea of what works for your target audience and you have your goals outlined, experiment with a mix of unbranded and branded messaging, this will help you understand what type of content your audience is more receptive to engaging with.

TweetReach: Thanks so much for your time and insight, Sarah!

Sarah Reynolds is the Senior Social Media Manager at ICED Media, an online strategy and marketing company in New York City. She oversees the overall online strategy for two Kmart apparel platforms, Kmart Fashion and Stylesip. This includes copy editing, customer service, creative design, and paid media campaigns. She’s also the voice behind @KmartFashion. She graduated from NYU in three years with a degree from Gallatin School of Individualized Study where she focused on the current and historical effects of advertising, marketing, and art on society. She enjoys being tweeted.

Written by Dean Cruse

July 13th, 2011 at 3:55 pm

Jose Cuervo drinking Captain Morgan under the Twitter table

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Here at TweetReach, we’ve never been ones to turn down a good drink – and based on results from two TweetReach Trackers we’ve been running, neither have Twitter users. Over the last few weeks, we’ve been tracking keywords, hashtags and @replies related to both Jose Cuervo tequila and Captain Morgan rum – and an interesting battle of the booze battle has ensued. Cuervo is drinking El Capitan under the table by a measure of 7:1 based on impressions across Twitter, or 4:1 when you look at unique Twitter users. In September, tweets related to Jose Cuervo generated 7.8 million Twitter impressions, reaching a possible 2.5 million unique users, while about 1 million impressions (reaching 650K unique users) have had a bit of The Captain in them. See the graphic below for exact figures.

Some additional bottom-of-the-glass analysis also shows that engagement among those inspired by Cuervo terms on Twitter is much deeper, and in fact, may be bringing more exposure to the brand. For example, about 45% saw a Jose Cuervo-related tweet between 2-7 times versus about half of that amount (22%) for Captain Morgan.

Interestingly, neither brand’s website links to Twitter in any way, but both do have a Facebook presence. Neither have much in the way of official, active Twitter accounts either. So, even if you don’t officially participate in a particular social media channel, this shows that your brand can still be talked about and discussed there. And when celebrities and other accounts with thousands or millions of followers tweet about you or your product, like fake Gary Busey did about Jose Cuervo (which was retweeted 500 times generating 240K impressions), it becomes pretty clear why brands should consider participating in that activity.

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Written by Dean Cruse

October 12th, 2010 at 1:12 pm

Posted in Trends

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