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Archive for the ‘best practices’ tag

Best practices and tips for Twitter and TweetReach

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Whether you know someone just getting started with Twitter as they’re launching their new business, or you want to brush up on some of the basics yourself, we’ve rounded up all of the Twitter and TweetReach tips and best practices we’ve written up and tested and put them here for your convenience.

Twitter Best Practices

Twitter Hashtag Best Practices

Why you should use lists on Twitter

Use favorite tweets to find new resources

Brands: why you should favorite tweets

Using Twitter Trending Topics to your advantage

Twitter Quick Tips

Twitter Tip: Authorized apps 

Twitter Tip: Turn off mobile alerts at bedtime

Twitter Tip: User Widgets

Twitter Tip: Emergency alerts

Twitter Tip: Personalize

Twitter Tip: Discover

TweetReach Tips

Tracking Instagram, Vine and more with TweetReach (And now, of course, you can also use our Union Metrics for Instagram analytics!)

TweetReach Tip: Measuring the results of a Twitter contest

Using TweetReach to monitor a social media crisis

TweetReach Tip: Find & engage influencers on Twitter with TweetReach snapshot reports

TweetReach Tip: Common Tracker mistakes

TweetReach Tip: Improve your snapshot report search query

TweetReach Tip: Measuring the reach of a Twitter account

TweetReach Tip: Saving your snapshot reports

TweetReach Tip: Excluding tweets from your search

TweetReach Tip: Searching for a specific tweet

TweetReach Tip: Searching for URLs

TweetReach Tip: How to isolate specific dates in a Tracker

TweetReach Tip: How to isolate specific dates in a snapshot report

Today’s TweetReach Tip: When tweets are available for analysis

Got any good tips we missed or questions you want answered? Leave them in the comments, or find us on Twitter. We’re always happy to answer your questions!

Image courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery. 

Written by Sarah

May 7th, 2014 at 11:24 am

The Week in Social Analytics #88

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Your Brand Is the Sum of the Stories We Tell About You [from Mack Collier]

“If you connect with your fans, the customers that love you, those fans will work with you to make sure they tell the story about your brand that you want other customers to hear.  Read that again until you understand just how important that is.”

Emphasis original.

5 Twitter Best Practices to Humanize Your Brand [from Social Media Today; written by Monica Jade Romeri]

Humans like to connect with other humans, not faceless corporate robots. (That’s why Merle has a face.)

The Confluence Of Content And Social Media: Insights For Success In 2014 [from Forbes; written by Jayson DeMers]

“One overarching theme in recent research is the benefit of properly targeting your social media efforts. If you want a better understanding of how social media influences your customers’ decisions to purchase your products and services, there are a few important questions that you’ve got to ask. In this case, a bit of smart consumer research will go a long way toward directing your social media strategy.”

6 Reasons Every Brand Should Create Social Video [from Social Times; written by Constance Aguilar]

“Video is quickly becoming the most effective brand marketing tool, and its popularity will continue to rise in 2014. Already 40 percent of the top 1,000 most popular Instagram videos are from brands, and a branded Vine video is four times more likely to be seen than a regular branded video.”

Millennials’ Social Media Posts Influence Peers to Buy New Products [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Millennials are significantly more likely than older generations to be influenced by their friends’ social media posts about products and services. According to January 2014 polling conducted by Harris Interactive for The Webby Awards, 68% of 18-to-34-year-old social media users surveyed were at least somewhat likely to make a purchase after seeing a friend’s post.”

Social Media and Millennials: How They Shop [from Heidi Cohen]

“Less than 1 in 6 social media influenced millennials shop exclusively in stores.”

If this is your target demographic and you’re selling on social, be sure you’re engaging in a timely, human way with your customers and followers, and be doubly sure all transaction processes are set up to run smoothly.

STUDY: Interacting With Other Brands Makes Consumers More Loyal [from PR Newser; written by Patrick Coffee]

“Here’s what we take from these findings: brands shouldn’t be afraid of competitors targeting their most loyal consumers. In fact, they might even want to encourage it. In many cases, trying something different just reminds you why you prefer your favorites.”

And finally, a bonus roundup of some posts on social media myths:

Busting The Myths of Social Media and Content Marketing [Geekless Tech] 

6 Social Media Marketing Myths To Avoid [Business2Community]

Written by Sarah

February 7th, 2014 at 8:42 am

Twitter hashtag best practices

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Hashtags are a delightful, double-edged sword. On one hand, they enable you to organize your tweets so they can be found by others interested in the same type of content. On the other hand, they can be hijacked by those looking to capitalize on the popularity of particular hashtag. With that in mind, you’ll want to go through a checklist of several hashtag best practices to get the most out of using them without wasting a good tweet on a bad hashtag.

Create your hashtag

Keep it short, relevant, and simple. If you use a really long hashtag, people won’t have as much room to add their thoughts. For example: #MMchat stands for #MarketingMondays (a Twitter chat*), but the full version is too long to use in an interactive Twitter event. You want attendees to be able to add as much as possible to the conversation.

Test your hashtag

Once you’ve come up with a snappy hashtag, you need to find out: Is it already being used? Is this particular hashtag routinely spammed by random, unrelated accounts? (If you’re using a general hashtag to increase reach on a post- which we cover in the next section- you’ll want to avoid hashtags that get spammed by unrelated accounts.) Do a quick search on Twitter to see if a hashtag is already being used and, if so, how. For example, searching #socialchat turns up that it’s already a popular hashtag in use for a tweet chat which means you’d want to pick something different for your chat or event. The general hashtag #socialmedia is fast moving and full of information, but also routinely gets spammed. You might test out using it, but know that it’s easy for your post to get lost in the flow of information.

For a more detailed look at how to maximize your hashtag use for both tweet chats (similar to Twitter parties, but reoccurring) and events such as conferences, you might want to check out these other posts:

16 ways to use Twitter to improve your next conference

7 tips to maximize your conference attendance using Twitter

Miss a conference? 5 tips for getting the most out of the hashtag on Twitter

The key to a successful Twitter party? Planning ahead.

9 tips for getting the most out of Twitter chats: As a host

10 tips for getting the most out of Twitter chats: As a participant

Get more out of a hashtag

You can extend the reach of a post by using more popular and general hashtags– in moderation. For example: If you’re talking about analytics, #measure and #msure are great hashtags to use in order to expose your post to a larger audience of people interested in data measurement. We don’t recommend using more than three hashtags in the majority of your tweets, however; too many hashtags look spammy.

Searching broader hashtags related to your industry will also help you find interesting content to learn from and share on your own accounts, in addition to surfacing interesting influencers to follow.

Hashtags are also a great way to find people who share similar interests to you outside of work, particularly with the rise of social television:

9 tips for watching TV on Twitter

Track your hashtag: Includes TweetReach-specific tips

You can track hashtags using our tools- either to get an idea of a conversation in a snapshot report (free, or a $20 full report) or monitor an ongoing conversation in a TweetReach Pro Tracker. Why would you want to do this? Hashtags can give you a great idea of the conversation around specific topics or events that are affecting the general population– or you in particular, if it’s a campaign hashtag you want to know the reach and results of.

How do you make sure you’re getting all the information you need? Check out:

Common Tracker Mistakes

What to do when your campaign hashtag gets hijacked on Twitter

In conclusion

Have a hashtag question we didn’t address? Leave it in the comments, or find us on Twitter. Happy hashtagging!

*Twitter chats, or tweet chats, are reoccurring virtual events where people meet to discuss various topics using a hashtag to connect the conversation. They’re a great way to network, and increase or share your knowledge on a topic. 

Written by Sarah

December 11th, 2013 at 11:18 am