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The Week in Social Analytics #91

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

New Research: Most Companies Do Not Have the Talent to Leverage Marketing Analytics [from Convince & Convert; written by Tom Webster]

“The simple truth is that many marketers can’t show the business impact of social because they can’t show the business impact of a lot of things.

“All of which is to say this: if you are in the business of using social for your marketing efforts, either on the brand-side or the agency-side, now is a great time to dig those wells before you get thirsty. Use those extra dollars, and that extra optimism, to build analytics and pre/post campaign measurement into everything you do and to recruit or develop tomorrow’s analysts. End 2014 with more actionable insight and knowledge about the impact of social on your business than you have today. Hold your efforts to the highest possible standards–and let Darwin take care of the rest.”

Emphasis original.

A Marketer’s Guide to SXSW Brands try to keep Austin wired [from Adweek; written by Christopher Heine]

“For those braving the South-by crowds, be prepared for a little something weird. That’s just part of the deal, friendo.”

Adweek, preparing you for the “controlled chaos” of SXSW. As for us, this is what we’re up to during SXSWi. See you there?

This week had a ton of great articles on Instagram:

Fantastic Infographics, Drawn From A Study of Instagram Selfies [from Wired; written by Liz Stinson]

Finally the selfie gets the serious scientific study it deserves:

“Right now, there are more than 79 million photos on Instagram that fall under #selfie. This is not counting #selfies (7 million photos), #selfienation (1 million photos), #selfiesfordays (400,000 photos) or the countless number of photos with no hashtag at all. You might be thinking: “Finally, we’ve reached peak #selfie!” But according to a new study, only 3-5 percent of photos on Instagram fall into the category.”

Keys to Photog Jamie Beck’s Success: Tumblr, Insta, Hard Work [from Racked; written by Chavie Lieber]

Did social media help at all with the jump start?

‘Well, I was kind of behind on Twitter, but Tumblr for sure, it was amazing. They were really supporting our community of original content creators. We were part of the original smaller group of people [on Tumblr] so it was easier to engage. We went to meet-ups, and made friends who were incredibly supportive. It was definitely right time, right place.’”

Emphasis original.

How Instagram Harnesses the Awesome Power of Mobile, Social Media and Photos: 3 Success Stories [from Jeff Bullas]

“This visual self expression and sharing culture combines the power of three.

  1. People’s obsession with their iPhone (read smartphone)
  2. Engagement power of Facebook
  3. The love of photos that seems to have been reinforced with the easy availability of the camera in your pocket

The only challenge for marketers is how to harness that through a touch of creativity.”

Instagram Captures Higher Interaction Rates than Facebook [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“While Instagram’s community of 150 million monthly active users was a fraction of the size of Facebook’s, and even smaller than Twitter’s, the digital marketing organization found that interaction rates for posts made by the 249 prestige brands studied were some 15 times higher than those on Facebook.

Emphasis added.

Can Flickr Catch Instagram? [from Geoff Livingston]

“Flickr celebrated 10 years of serving photos earlier this month, making it an old man amongst social networks. But the photo network is still relevant today, ranking in the top 10 social networks thanks to a resurgence under Marissa Mayer’s watch. In fact, Flickr is now ranked just one spot behind rival photo network Instagram.”

Here’s how to become the ultimate Tumblr power user [from The Daily Dot; written by Aja Romano]

A fantastic roundup of basic Tumblr tips- including all the changes from Tumblr’s recent revamps- and some excellent power user tips.

10 Must-Know Tips to Leverage Pinterest for Your Business [from Social Media Today; written by Brett Relander]

“Pinterest offers perhaps the most unique benefits among all social media platforms. And if your businesses’ content marketing strategy has not factored Pinterest in the mix you are missing out on a huge chunk of traffic from a site that sends more visitors to web properties than the much-vaunted Twitter and has more than 70 million users.”

Three Ways Twitter Chats Can Help Build Your Technology Brand [from Edelman PR; written by Aurora Arlet]

You can find us hanging out in #MMchat  followed by #socialchat on Monday evenings starting at 7pm CT.

Facebook Pulls Ahead of Twitter in Social TV Battle, But Can It Win the War? [from Social Media Today; written by Elizabeth Kent]

“Why Does Social TV Matter for Marketers?
Last but not least, what does all this mean for marketers? The data acquired from Facebook and Twitter on TV viewing and social media use can be used for:

  • Better insights: Social TV data is critical because it allows marketers to better understand who their audience is.
  • Campaign optimization: Through these insights, marketers can optimize their advertising campaigns to maximize effectiveness.
  • Cost-effective ad purchasing: Understanding when certain ads are most effective will allow marketers to make advertising purchases that are more cost-effective.
  • Real-time change: With real-time data comes real-time change. Marketers may be able to use social TV data to improve their advertising campaigns in real-time for immediate results.
  • Social media integration: Data has shown that when networks and advertisers incorporate social media content into their broadcasts, they are able to engage more effectively with their audience.”

Introducing Promoted Accounts in search [from Twitter; written by Nipoon Malhotra]

“With this launch, relevant Promoted Accounts can be presented to users in search results along with recommendations of people to follow. We automatically select relevant search queries for presenting Promoted Accounts based on an advertiser’s targeting choices, so no additional action is required for your business to access this capability.”

 

Written by Sarah

February 28th, 2014 at 9:12 am

Super Bowl XLVIII: Brands on Twitter

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On Friday we took a look at all the brand chatter on Twitter leading up to last night’s blowout Super Bowl game between the Seattle Seahawks and the Denver Broncos. The lack of action on the field turned a lot of faces toward their second screen instead, and made for some entertaining brand interactions (Marketing Land catalogued some of them).

Here’s a second look at the brands we examined on Friday- this time for activity on game day alone- and the answer to the eternal question “Is SodaStream still making Coke and Pepsi say #sorry?”

Budweiser

Budweiser’s #UpForWhatever hashtag saw 7k tweets from 6k contributors with an overall reach of 14.6 million; about 5x the activity they saw leading up to the big game. The most retweeted tweet was again from Bud Light and featured Arnold Schwarzenegger:

This tweet has seen 600 RTs so far.

Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola saw 49.4k tweets on big game day, from 41.4k Twitter users for a total reach of 32.5 million, just over three times the activity from their game day lead-up conversations. The most retweeted tweet was from the official Coke account and included their #AmericaIsBeautiful campaign hashtag and was retweeted over 5k times so far:

Doritos

Doritos aired the two winning commercials from their Crash the Super Bowl contest last night, and each saw some activity around around their respective hashtags- #TimeMachine and #CowboyKid- and the whole conversation around Doritos, including their campaign hashtag #ForTheBold, saw 16.7k tweets from 15.1k contributors for an overall reach of 14.6 million. That’s about six times the activity we saw in their game day lead-up.

The most retweeted tweet around the Doritos conversation with the #Doritos hashtag came from their official account, congratulating the Seahawks on their win:

It has seen 94 retweets so far.

Kia

The conversation around Kia last night didn’t change much from their lead-up: 1.4k tweets from 1.2k contributors, for an overall reach of 3.2 million. The most retweeted tweet actually came from some entertaining brand interaction from Xbox, based on Kia’s Matrix-themed commercial:

This tweet was part of a back-and-forth conversation from the brands, and has earned a total of 276 retweets so far.

SodaStream

SodaStream has the most activity around its name by far in the lead-up conversations we looked at last week, but yesterday saw much lower activity numbers for them: 6.6k tweets from 4.9k contributors, for a total reach of 16.4 million. It seems a little brand controversy will get you talked about leading up to an event, but not necessarily boost the conversation once the event takes place.

One of the most retweet tweets featuring their hashtag #SorryCokeAndPepsi came from the official SodaStream account, and referred to their celebrity spokesperson Scarlett Johansson:

It has seen just 23 retweets so far.

Toyota

Terry Crews and The Muppets teamed up for Toyota’s #NoRoomForBoring ad last night, and the conversation around Toyota saw a little boost in activity, if a drop in reach, from their lead-up: 12.4k tweets from 10.2k contributors, for a total reach of 14.3 million.

One of the most retweeted tweets came from the official Muppets account, and featured King Prawn Pepe doing a touchdown dance on Vine:

311 retweets for the dancing King Prawn so far, and some decent crossover exposure for Toyota.

What about brands who didn’t buy ad time?

A lot of brands who don’t buy ad time still live-tweet during big cultural events to interact with viewers and other brands; last night saw a lot of discussion between brands, riffing on the commercials and more. A standout was definitely J.C. Penney, who decided to tweet in a pair of mittens to very mixed results. The numbers, however, are in their favor: 131k tweets from 81.2k contributors, for a total reach of 36.9 million. That’s slightly more reach than Coke, who usurped SodaStream on game day, but more than twice the amount of activity.

Both of their slightly incoherent tweets saw around 20k retweets:

22.7k retweets so far.

19.2k retweets so far.

A number of other brands- even some of the big game advertisers- interacted with J.C. Penney’s tweets:

Coors Light jumped in first, getting some exposure- 7.1k retweets- on a night dominated by their competitor Bud Light.

Kia’s tweet has seen 3.1k retweets so far, while Snickers and Doritos both offered themselves as snacks to soak up any extraneous Coors Light:

Snickers has gotten 3.1k retweets so far, and Doritos 1.3k.

The Takeaways

We are living in the real-time marketing present, it would seem. The brands who saw the most activity and reach last night were the ones who were interacting like people do on Twitter around big cultural events, and inserting their brand in ways that were funny and relevant. J.C. Penney may have confused a lot of people with their decision to tweet in mittens, but it definitely got everyone talking about them. It remains to be seen whether it will help them sell any more mittens.

Watching brands interact during events like the Super Bowl has become an unexpected highlight for many viewers, especially when the action happens to be slow on the main screen.

What was your favorite social moment of the big game last night?

Written by Sarah

February 3rd, 2014 at 8:31 am

Super Bowl Preview: Brands on Twitter

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Super Bowl XLVIII will be upon us in two days, so we thought we’d take a look at what the chatter is like on Twitter around some of the brands who have purchased multi-million dollar ad time around the game.

Budweiser

Budweiser had already released its full #BestBuds ad and a teaser for their hero’s welcome ad when they released the full version yesterday. They kept their biggest ad under wraps until yesterday as well, leading up to it with a full series of teasers sharing the set-up, including some celebrity names: Arnold Schwarzenegger, Don Cheadle (with a llama), Reggie Watts, and a promised fourth (who turned out to be Minka Kelly and not the llama, Lilly).

The hashtag for the ad, #UpForWhatever, has been used in 1.3k tweets from 1.2k contributors, with an overall reach of 3.1 million– all since Tuesday, January 28th. The most retweeted tweet? From the official Bud Light Twitter account, sharing the full spot, with 453 retweets:

 

Coca-Cola

Coke’s big game spot “Going All The Way” was released in full this week, and the conversation around Coke and the Super Bowl on Twitter since Monday, January 27th has seen 15k tweets from 12.5k contributors, for a reach of 12.8 million. That’s about four times Budweiser’s reach, so far.

The most retweeted tweet with their hashtag #AmericaIsBeautiful is this one from the official Coca-Cola Twitter account, sharing their full ad and promising a $50k donation to the Boys and Girls Club of America for 10k shares of the spot:

 

Fortunately it’s not based on retweets, since it was only retweeted 49 times.

Doritos

Doritos ran a contest to air a fan-made ad again this year, but unlike last year they opened it to residents outside of the U.S., provided they live in one of the other countries where Doritos are sold. Voting has ended, and two of the spots will be shown at the big game on Sunday (in addition to other prizes).

2.7k tweets from 2.4k contributors about Doritos and the Super Bowl, their contest, and their hashtag #ForTheBold have been tweeted since Tuesday, with a reach of 4.4 million, or about 1/3 of Coke’s reach so far.

The most retweeted tweet in this conversation around Doritos and the big game is from ESPN Sports Business Reporter & ABC News Business Correspondent Darren Rovell. It’s a recipe idea for a big game party:

This was retweeted 240 times.

Kia

Kia reached back to the 1999 movie The Matrix for Morpheus to reveal to Super Bowl audiences the truth about luxury. On Twitter using hashtags #KiaK900, #RedKey, #BeTheOne, and #ChallengeLuxury, 1.3k tweets have been posted by 1.2k contributors for a reach of 1.4 million since January 22nd, putting them at the bottom of the list of brand mentions right now. The most retweeted tweet comes from the official Kia Twitter account, and shares the full game ad:

 

Morpheus was retweeted 865 times; a lot of revealed luxury.

SodaStream

While SodaStream’s ad has been banned by Fox for its direct mention of competitors Coke and Pepsi (the line from the ad is reflected in their hashtag #SorryCokeAndPepsi), that hasn’t dampened the conversation around the Scarlett Johansson spot on Twitter: 18.6k tweets have been made by 13.9k contributors since Tuesday, for a reach of 56.2 million. This time it’s just #SorryCoke so far; we’ll have to wait until later to see if they usurp Pepsi too.

The most retweeted tweet featuring their hashtag #SorryCokeAndPepsi is this one from the official SodaStream Twitter account, explaining the controversy over their ad:

SodaStream might have the most reach in the Super Bowl conversation thus far, but that tweet only garnered 7 retweets.

Toyota

Toyota has teamed up with former NFL player and actor Terry Crews and timeless entertainers The Muppets to show off their new Highlander, which has #NoRoomForBoring. Since Tuesday, 10.1k tweets have been made by 8.3k contributors for a reach of 24.5 million. That’s about double Coke’s reach, but still half that of SodaStream. One of the most retweeted #NoRoomForBoring tweets was from the official Toyota account, and featured a custom Vine of Rowlf:

 

It has seen 125 retweets so far.

Want more?

We’ll be back Monday with more numbers from the big game itself. Let us know if you end up making those Doritos Crusted Chicken Strips.

Written by Sarah

January 31st, 2014 at 4:31 pm

Native advertising and the holidays

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Good native advertising isn’t about blending so seamlessly into the platform you’re advertising on that you trick consumers into clicking on your ad– it’s showing them that you’ve taken the time to deeply understand the place they choose to spend their time by crafting an original piece of content that fits the form and spirit of it. You don’t just want to appear to be a part of the community; you want to take the time to become part of the community, and show that you have something to offer it just like any other member.

The holidays in particular are a time brands should be mindful of how they approach the communities their customers have built on different platforms. In the stream of continual “BUY! GIFTS! SPEND!” you don’t want to come across as pushing into a formerly free, personal space with an aggressively out of place advertisement. Take the time to do it right, like these examples that follow, or rethink doing it at all.

Instagram.

Although Instagram ads haven’t been around very long, they’re already showing a lot of promise, which likely has a lot to do with Instagram’s commitment to rolling ads out slowly and working with brands that are taking the time to understand what users enjoy about the platform: Interesting visuals, a way to examine and showcase the things they love with friends they know in real life, and the virtual ones they’ve made.

Instagram also feels more intimate and candid than a press photo of a celebrity, allowing users who follow their “faves” to feel a little like they have an inside look at the life of who they admire. This can extend to brands, who have an opportunity to share a creative, more personal side not achievable in other forms of advertising; smart brands are taking advantage of this.

Ben & Jerry’s has been celebrated for doing it right on Instagram by posting creative images simply sharing their enthusiastic love for ice cream while also incorporating timely themes. According to AdWeek, they’ve gone from an “average daily follower growth [of] 429, pre-ads, to more than 7,200, post-ads.”

Tie-in ad with the new Anchorman movie: 250k+ Likes

Likes and follows might be dismissed by many as vanity metrics, but they’re the perfect jumping off point. Growing your audience is the first step to getting more eyeballs on your products, but a lot of ad formats can achieve that. Social platforms go further by increasing engagement with customers and potential customers, especially if brands reach out with questions and contests that reward participation.

Tumblr.

Tumblr recently released its 2013 Year in Review, including a look at which sponsored posts performed the best. The top posts from the Tumblr Radar also included some promotional content; namely Beyoncé from the Super Bowl (we wrote about her Super Bowl popularity over on our Tumblr). Sponsored Radar posts were the first form of Tumblr advertising, and seeing a promotional post in the top posts of the year is important as it means users loved the content enough to share it as many times as the original content that came out of every other community on the site.

The most popular sponsored post on Tumblr was from streaming site Hulu and featured a gif from a movie they were showing from the Criterion Collection, free for a weekend: The Red Balloon. Visual elements like gifs perform consistently well on Tumblr, and the copy had the kind of slightly off-beat sense of humor Tumblr users are known for.

This gif post saw 326.2k+ notes

Hulu didn’t just slap a gif on a site known for using them; they spent the time to create and share something they hoped members of the film community- and anyone else who came across it- on Tumblr would genuinely enjoy. It seems they succeeded.

The takeaway.

Brands are entering the social spaces where people have been exchanging ideas, creations, friendship, and more for years. In approaching that with respect, brands can become meaningful contributors to the communities full of the customers they hope to reach, rather than resented traveling salesmen.

Adding a little festive cheer in this time of year won’t hurt, either.

Just follow the lead of the ice cream men.

Written by Sarah

December 17th, 2013 at 9:22 am

This Week in Social Media Analytics #61

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The Teacher’s Guide to Social Media [from Mashable; written by Eric Larson]

Some common sense advice, plus some great resources for teachers looking to connect with students and parents in the social realm.

Social Media and Consumer Empowerment Don’t Match, Study [from SocialBarrel; written by Neal Lasta]

 ”According to a study conducted by the Journal of Consumer Research, once a consumer is empowered, it gets very hard to influence him or her through social media.”

Link to purchase full study in the quote above.

Mobile Tops Desktop for Social Sharing [from eMarkter; written by eMarketer staff]

“Twitter was well represented for sharing media and publishing content, and nearly as common a platform for consumer brand info as Facebook.”

Mark Twain’s 10-Sentence Course on Branding and Marketing [from MarketingProfs; written by Tom Bentley]

1. Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.

Seth Godin remarked that today’s publishing, with its instant electronic availability, has made the physical book a trophy of sorts, a kind of souvenir. Twain was 100 years ahead of Seth.”

Entertaining- it is filled with a lot of Twain zingers, after all- and applicable.

3 Social Media Questions Every Brand Should Ask Itself [from Fast Company; written by Hayes Davis]

“Brands often look for absolutes on social media–i.e., customers either love them or hate them. Don’t fall into the sentiment trap and look only at compliments or complaints; mine the entire conversations for trends. Are there hidden messages that might not even be directed at your brand that can tell you a lot about underlying consumer wants and needs? Sometimes there is a larger story in what customers are implicitly saying.”

Our CEO wrote this, so we might be a little biased, but we think it’s a great piece.

Tweets power “the shortest NASCAR race in history” in ad from never.no, Sprint and Leo Burnett [from The Drum; written by Jennifer Faull]

“Billed as ‘the shortest race in NASCAR history’, the 60-second ‘race’ asked fans to Tweet their favourite driver’s car number, along with the hashtag #Sprint60. Each Tweet increased the driver’s speed, pushing them faster along the track as viewers watched the progress live.”

We Are Social launches Siemens’ global recruitment campaign via Tumblr [from Campaign; written by Lynsey Barber]

“‘Tumblr is increasingly popular with a young audience, and people are already sharing and commenting on content on the platform, so it was the natural choice for this campaign.’”

Creating a Meaningful Tumblr Campaign [from ClickZ; written by Tessa Wegert]

“The success of Tumblr campaigns depends on the ability of brand marketers to make their ads and blogs as interesting as the user-generated content they’ll ultimately sit alongside.”

Great examples of some recent Tumblr campaigns.

Written by Sarah

August 2nd, 2013 at 9:44 am

This Week in Social Analytics #54

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Reuters Digital News Report 2012 [from Reuter's Institute for the Study of Journalism]

 ”Blogs and social media are much more regularly used in the United States than in Europe (36% use these as a news source every week compared with an average of 20% in European countries).”

Online news source by type

Social’s Impact on TV Still Small, but Growing [from Marketing Charts; written by Marketing Charts Staff]

“But, the study finds there is significant room for growth: the proportion of study respondents who interact with TV-related content on social media on at least a weekly basis is triple those who do so on a daily basis (37% vs. 12%), and the data also shows that social plays a bigger role in drawing viewers to new than existing shows.”

The Social Media Editor Isn’t Dead, It’s Maturing [from Mashable; written by Meghan Peters]

“Once others in the organization become not only equipped but also passionate about it, the editor doesn’t die. He or she focuses on what’s next.”

Eight Silly Data Myths Marketing People Believe That Get Them Fired [from Occam's Razor; written by Avinash Kaushik]

Your Friday long read.

Google Takes Home Half of Worldwide Mobile Internet Ad Revenues [from eMarketer; written by eMarketer staff]

“Twitter is also expected to see its worldwide mobile ad spending share increase this year to about 2% of the total, eMarketer estimates. In the US, however, Twitter will have a higher, 3.6% share, eMarketer estimates.”

On Tumblr and Nonprofits [from Everything PR; written by  Esti Landau]

 ”To sum up: Tumblr is an all around win-win proposition for nonprofits.”

WATCH: Which Brands Do Tumblr Best? [from The Huffington Post; written by Shawn Amos]

Denny’s has taken the time to learn the culture of Tumblr– and it shows.

Tumblr, Foursquare Execs Map Out New Directions, Tools for Brands [from Xconomy; written by Michael Davidson]

“Brands want to put their best foot forward and have an expansive palette to convey their message,” Gottfrid said. “We think they can tell bigger stories on Tumblr with the tools that we have.”

 

Written by Sarah

June 14th, 2013 at 9:12 am

This Week in Social Analytics #52

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Social Gives SMBs Maximum Exposure [from eMarketer]

“The greatest benefit of social media was increasing exposure, cited by 89% of respondents, while another 75% said it helped increase traffic. A significantly lesser percentage (43%) said social helped them increase sales. This points to social’s role as a brand builder, first and foremost.”

State of the internet 2013 shows extreme mobile growth, 500 million photos daily, 100 hours of video every minute [from Faves + Co.]

Highlight:

“About a quarter of people worldwide say they share ‘everything’ or ‘most things’ online.”

Research: Social Media Finally Seen As Essential for CEOs [from Forbes; written by Chris Perry]

“Today, we released a new report that outlines the benefits and expectations of CEO social participation. Conducted in partnership with KRC Research, we surveyed over 600 senior executives from 10 markets worldwide. The research found that 76% of global executives say they want their CEO to engage in social media, noting a wide-ranging list of benefits. At the top of the list was improved ability to share company news and information, a positive impact on company reputation and business results, and the ability to communicate more directly with employees, customers, and other key stakeholders.”

Home Tweet Home: A House with Its Own Voice on Twitter [from MIT Tech Review; written by Rachel Metz]

“Eventually, Coates says, Internet connectivity will work its way into all kinds of household appliances, especially “boring” ones like dishwashers and washing machines, allowing them to notify you on your smartphone when they’re done doing their job.”

Tumblr launches first in-stream sponsored posts on web following mobile rollout [from The Verge; written by Ellis Hamburger]

Mobile sponsored posts have racked up 10 million likes and reblogs so far, as Tumblr rolls out dashboard sponsored posts.

Corcoran: Tumblr an ‘incredibly effective’ marketing tool [from Inman News; written by Teke Wiggin]

“Q: Have you found Tumblr to be an effective marketing tool? What are its advantages and disadvantages? How does it compare to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn?

A: Yes, Tumblr has been incredibly effective for us. It’s our largest social media platform in terms of subscribers, with more than 115,000— much bigger than our presence on Facebook. We receive hundreds of organic interactions each day, and are currently growing at about 500 new subscribers per day.

We’ve found its simplicity, mobile optimization, ease of use, and connection to a different type of New York audience to be tremendous advantages for us…We find Tumblr a very effective platform for experimenting with new types of content. It was the forerunner of what later became our iPad app.

Tumblr also allows us to refine our approach to how and where we share our listings, which photos perform most effectively, and what types of properties resonate best with users moving between our interactive platforms. We’ve integrated what we do on Tumblr into everything else we do online.”

Emphasis added.

Written by Sarah

May 31st, 2013 at 9:52 am

This Week in Social Analytics #48

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Positive Brand Tweets are Four Times More Effective Than Non-Tweet Ads [from Fast Company; written by Kit Eaton]

“For example, research by Deloitte suggests that a positive-message tweet can be four times more effective at getting a consumer to engage with a brand (hence, driving sales) than a non-Twitter advertisement.”

More details in this video.

Social media attracts/drives purchases for moms [from Marketing Charts]

“Mothers who are very active on social networks (defined as the top 20% of social networking mothers aged 18-49) are indeed active online purchasers. Compared to the general online adult population, they’re 96% more likely to have made an online food and beverage purchase, 73% more likely to have spent on movies and videos, 61% more likely to have bought apparel, and 82% more likely to have made an online purchase in the toys and games category.”

Is online privacy over? Findings from the USC Annenberg Center for the Digital Future show Millennials embrace a new online reality [from USC Annenberg News]

“The survey, conducted by the USC Annenberg Center for the Digital Future and Bovitz Inc., reveals a “Millennial Rift” — distinct differences in online behavior and core values among Millennials (ages 18-34) compared to other users, many of whom are only a few years older. Millennials, the survey found, report more willingness to allow access to their personal data or web behavior and a greater interest in cooperating with Internet businesses — as long as they receive tangible benefits in return (view infographic breakdown).”

Twitter Speaks, Markets Listen, and Fears Rise [from The New York Times; written by Amy Chozick and Nicole Perlroth]

“Could the global economy hinge on 140 characters?”

Twitter Strikes Major Advertising Deal For Social TV [from Viral Blog; written by Igor Beuker]

“In the Financial Times president of global revenue Adam Bain stated: “’We think that the industry had been focused in the wrong area, which was making a decision between Twitter and TV. That’s not what we believe. Twitter is a bridge.’”

Social TV: Facebook Vs. Twitter Vs. Tumblr [from AllFacebook; written by Will M]

“Most speakers agreed that Facebook’s social TV data is richer than what can be found on Twitter. Tumblr Entertainment Evangelist David Hayes explained social platforms for TV this way.

  • Twitter is where people say they are watching a show.
  • Facebook is where people say why they are watching a show.
  • Tumblr is where people express themselves by creating great content about a show.”

6 Tips to Start Creating Content on Tumblr [from Business2Community; written by Adrienne Erin]

“Once you adapt to this new format, Tumblr can be a powerful content creation (and content curation) tool that increases engagement, website traffic, and inbound leads. Here are six tips that will help you get started with content marketing on Tumblr.”

Tumblr CEO says average cost of ad campaign tops six figures [from CNET; written by Shara Tibken]

“‘What we’re doing is giving advertisers space on a canvas to make the kinds of ads that win awards,’ Karp said. ‘That kind of advertising doesn’t have a place on the Web today…You can’t make an ad that anybody even remembers on Twitter or Facebook today.’”

Written by Sarah

May 3rd, 2013 at 9:21 am

This Week in Social Analytics #44

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Facebook to See Three in 10 Mobile Display Dollars This Year [from eMarketer]

“Both Facebook and Twitter have benefited from their use of so-called native ad formats that are seamlessly integrated within the core user experiences of their respective products. The resulting ability for both companies to deliver mobile ad impressions at much higher volume than many traditional ad publishers has helped them capture market share very quickly.”

What Does That Second Screen Mean for Viewers and Advertisers? [from AdWeek; written by Lucia Moses]

Social television does more than just give people something to collectively chatter about on a social network; it engages them emotionally:

“When people used Facebook, Twitter or GetGlue while watching TV, their emotional engagement was 1.3 times higher than that of solo TV viewers.”

This has a lot of different implications for advertisers.

Twitter Relaunches Its Twitter For Business Site With More Content, New Video [from Marketing Land; written by Matt McGee]

“Twitter has also published a new video that, in my opinion, is the most effective messaging the company has offered yet for businesses — not just why, but also how to do business on Twitter. It’s basic and meant for beginners, but there’s a lot of information packed into a little more than two minutes.”

More from Twitter Dev: Mobile app deep linking and new cards [from Twitter's Developers blog; written by Jason Costa]

A breakdown of Twitter’s new card capabilities, straight from the development team.

4 Types of Content Consumption (Research) | Content Marketing: How We Use Multiple Devices [from Heidi Cohen's blog; written by Heidi Cohen]

Social Spider-Webbing is the opposite of Investigative Spider-Webbing in that it’s extroverted. Focused on sharing and connecting, it allows viewers to connect with others (both friends and like minded individuals) while watching live events and television shows.

Overwhelmingly social spider webbing makes solitary content consumption a social activity. More than two out of five respondents use it to connect with others. About a third use it habitually. About one in four chooses social spider webbing to enhance their enjoyment of their content consumption.”

You can find the link to the full study here.

And before you ban Facebook at the office:

Social Media: Not the Productivity Killer You Thought? [from Inc; written by Francesca Louise Fenzi]

“This tiny group of social network butterflies, however, ranked as the most efficient. Employees who belonged to more than five social networks had a 1.6 percent higher sales conversion than their counterparts and a 2.8 percent lower average call time.

While the data is interesting, it’s next to impossible to determine causation. But Mike Houseman, the managing director of Evolv, posits that performance may be linked to the sociability of employees who belong to several online networks.”

Written by Sarah

April 5th, 2013 at 9:05 am

Chrysler Imported from Detroit ad wins Super Bowl XLV

with 4 comments

As always, this year’s Super Bowl ads generated lots of conversation. We posted an analysis of overall Super Bowl ad winners based on tweets, but we wanted to have a more in-depth discussion here about some of the individual ads.

One of the most-buzzed about Super Bowl ads was the Groupon Tibet ad. Many people are discussing this ad, debating whether it was offensive or hilarious. No matter what you think of it, the Groupon Super Bowl ad got people talking.

But for us, the big Super Bowl ad surprise was the Chrysler Imported from Detroit commercial. Not only was this one of our personal favorites of the night, but it seemed to be Twitter’s favorite, too. We tracked more than 38,000 tweets about this ad during the game, making it the most-tweeted about ad of Super Bowl XLV, even beating out those Doritos and Bud Light commercials. In the minute immediately following the ad, conversation about Chrysler peaked at 2,816 tweets in a single minute.

As soon as the game was over, I asked around about what people thought about the ads. Overwhelmingly, people loved the Chrysler ad. Here are a few of their thoughts:

As a former Detroiter and someone who has much love for the city (hopes to end up there one day again), and has made no secret about her love for Eminem, that Eminem/Chrysler ad just made the “Superbowl commercials” for me. I felt it – it made the hair on my arms stand up – you know he loves the city. It just reminded me of the spirit and heart in that city! -Maegan S.

I have to say overall American Car companies stepped up their advertising. Fewer Midwestern guys in trucks and more “stuff I’d like to buy”. -DJ S.

The Detroit commercial was amazing – such a wonderful depiction of the city. -Kelly R.

We also generated a word cloud from tweets about the ad. We removed the words related directly to the commercial (Chrysler, Detroit, Eminem, Super Bowl, and so on) to surface people’s opinions of the ad. As you can see, the overall opinion of this ad was very positive.

The Chrysler word cloud speaks even more loudly when compared to the Groupon commercial’s word cloud. Take a look:

Tweets about Chrysler often included words such as like, great, love, good, awesome, nice, and want, while tweets about Groupon often included words such as offensive, bad, fail, taste, and kenneth (in reference to a recent controversial tweet from fashion designer Kenneth Cole). And maybe this is a case of any publicity is good publicity for Groupon, as the ad has certainly caused quite a stir. The Groupon ad is steeped in humor and irony; CEO Andrew Mason claims the commercial was intended to make fun of themselves at Groupon. But Chrysler’s ad was far less ironic; it seemed to take itself and the audience seriously. Maybe this is why people responded so positively. The Detroit ad certainly stood out from the other commercials shown before and after it, both in terms of the commercial itself and the tweets about it.

Stay tuned, as we’ve got lots more analysis of the Super Bowl tweet data coming up later this week.

Written by Jenn D

February 8th, 2011 at 7:46 pm