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The Week in Social Analytics #90

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Instagram – Sales Versus Engagement | Research [from Heidi Cohen]

“On Instagram, the researchers found that images showing customers wearing or using the product resulted in sales. This helped with fit and use. By contrast, attention-getting or aspirational images drove engagement (such as likes and comments.)”

How Instameets Unite Instagrammers And Brands [from Viral Blog; written by Marion aan ‘t Goor]

If your brand is looking for a fresh perspective driven by customers, you might consider sponsoring an Instameet:

“There are multiple brands that are sponsoring instameets and lending out their products (such as cameras and camera supplies) so Instagrammers can try them out.”

Coca-Cola’s Secret to Storytelling [from Social Times; written by Christie Barakat]

The company applies the “water cooler test” to determine if blog, photo and video content is compelling:

  • Does it answer the “Why should I care” test?
  • Does it surprise you?
  • Is it compelling with universal appeal?
  • Is it being measured systematically?

TV’s Approach to Firing Up Social Fan Base Applies Across Brands [from PR Newser; written by Nancy Lazarus]

“‘Give fans recognition and shine; that’s not precious to TV, it could apply to any fans out there’, said Tom Chirico, VP digital and social engagement for VH1.”

Brands, Stop Chasing New Customers and Ignoring Your Existing Ones [from Mack Collier]

“I’ve talked about this before, but you build loyalty and create fans with rewards, not incentives. Offering me products if I will switch to your company doesn’t win my loyalty to your brand, it simply gives me an incentive to take advantage of the offer. I may have to sign a 2-year contract to get all the goodies, but if you have ignored me and my business, guess what happens in 2 years? I will switch to your competitor, because they just offered me prizes and incentives for switching.

You are training your customers to leave you.”

Emphasis original.

6 Ways to Make People Love Your Brand [from Mashable; written by The Daily Muse]

“‘People don’t buy things for logical reasons,’ Zig Ziglar once famously said. ‘They buy for emotional reasons.’

Which means: In order to gain customers — and keep them for life — you’ve got to do more than introduce them to your brand, business, or product. You’ve got to make them fall in love with it.”

Click through for the full infographic on how.

Brands Slow to Respond to Complaints Posted on Social Media [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“In fact, fewer than 1 in 5 respondents said they respond to complaints within an hour. And although a slight majority do so within 24 hours, more than 1 in 5 say they rarely – if ever – respond to customer complaints made via social.”

Last Year, Social Ads Proved Highly Effective in Delivering New, Quality Audiences [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“The study reveals that social ads performed 52% better than the 4-channel average in delivering such quality users during Q4. In fact, social ads performed better than the average during each quarter of the year.”

Twitter Tips and Tricks That Don’t Work Anymore [from Business 2 Community; written by Roxanne Roark]

Split into a list of tips and tricks that do still work, and those that don’t. An important highlight from the don’t list:

“1. Add a period or really anything before someone’s Twitter handle so the tweet is public. If you don’t, the only people that can see it will be you and the person you are talking to, plus both your followers. This is no longer true and admittedly, I can’t tell you when it stopped being that way. Don’t believe me? Please let me note, these following accounts were NOT adding a period or anything in front of the Twitter handles, and to further verify, I signed in, unfollowed one of the accounts, and opened a different conversation between the account and another that I’ve never followed.”

Have any of you tested this to see if it still works or not?

Is Real-Time Marketing a Hoax? [from Social Times; written by Christie Barakat]

“Connecting with consumers in real-time requires more than industry grandstanding and knee-jerk reactions to prominent events; sensitivity, relevancy and prioritizing content is of paramount importance, and engaging narratives should first be designed according to an overarching editorial scheme. Real-time content should keep fans entertained as well as engaged, and follow a general story line that addresses an audiences varied interests.”

Written by Sarah

February 21st, 2014 at 9:15 am

The Olympic stories being shared on Twitter

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Medals are being tallied by country and events are winding down as the end of the 2014 Winter Olympics approaches– and we’re keeping an eye on it all on Twitter. Since our last update, tweets around the Sochi Olympics have nearly doubled: 30k tweets have now been posted with the hashtag #SochiOlympics since February 6th.

What are Olympic tweets sharing? We took a look at some of the most popular links included in tweets about the #SochiOlympics, and found more overlap with the conversation on Tumblr than might be expected:

One of the most popular links was this photo shared from the Twitter account Women’s Humor:

And here’s the full tweet it came from:

Another popular link from the Hindustan Times covered the same thing, from a more neutral and journalistic perspective.

Most of the other popular links shared are news stories, reflecting and reframing Olympic outcomes or highlighting serious issues around the games:

  •  An article from The Atlantic lays out how ”overall medal count obscures how these small countries [Norway, Slovenia, and Latvia] are outperforming their rivals in 2014″
  • A fashion and style blog celebrated Google’s inclusive Olympic-themed Google Doodles
  • And The Los Angeles Times highlighted the struggle of a village near Sochi and the problems stemming directly from the games

The content people share around an event puts a spotlight on what issues they think are important and interesting. Do these surprise you? Let us know in the comments, or on Twitter.

Want more? You can see all of our Olympic-related posts written about Tumblr here, and all of our TweetReach blog Olympics posts here

Written by Sarah

February 20th, 2014 at 11:53 am

Join us for a TweetReach Pro demo tomorrow 2/20 at 9am PST!

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Join us for a short demo this Thursday, February 20 at 9:00am PST and we’ll walk you through TweetReach Pro, our historical analytics and our snapshot reports.

Demos usually take 15-20 minutes followed by an open Q&A session. At the end, attendees will receive a discount code that can be applied to a TweetReach Pro subscription.

You can register here. Hope you can make it!

Written by Sarah

February 19th, 2014 at 9:01 am

House of Cards talk on Twitter

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The second season of the Netflix Original House of Cards premiered over the weekend, and many of us made our couches our Valentines in order to marathon the whole season, while talking about it on Twitter, of course. Starting on February 13 through the weekend, 367.2k tweets came from 210.3k contributors with a reach of 127.7M unique Twitter users. It got a pretty big endorsement:

Some of the other most retweeted tweets came from the official House of Cards Twitter account and were either hyping the release of the second season, or letting followers know it was officially up and available to stream:

Social media means an ever-increasing risk for show spoilers, but Netflix is on top of that with the release of their new Spoiler Foiler, as reported by Mashable:

The most popular hashtags used to talk about the show included use of the new tool, which marks this as a fantastic move from Netflix:

  1. #HouseOfCards
  2. #netflix
  3. #tvtag (an app formerly known as GetGlue)
  4. #FrankUnderwood
  5. #SpoilerFoiler

Did you catch House of Cards over the weekend?

Written by Sarah

February 17th, 2014 at 11:34 am

The Week in Social Analytics #89

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Instagram Video Done Right: 10 Inspiring Brand Examples [from Social Media Today; written by Katherine Leonard]

“40% of the most-shared Instagram videos are from brands.”

Instagram teaching ad-makers how to be less square [from The Verge; written by Ben Popper and Ellis Hamburger]

“The company today published The Instagram Handbook for Brands, a book profiling 11 companies that it thinks are doing a great job posting content on Instagram. Example posts come from the likes of Patagonia, Chobani, and Disneyland, and are accompanied by tips like “share experiences” and “find beauty everywhere.” The posts Instagram highlights in its book, and in a series of blog posts starting today, are markedly different from the ultra-composed and polished ad made by Michael Kors that tested back in November. Perhaps Instagram learned that ads would need to feel even more authentic and user-generated to avoid alienating users.”

Profile of the Top Vine Video Creators | Videos [from Social Media Today; written by Neil Davidson]

Image and video are predicted to be big in 2014; if you’re thinking about getting into video, see how the top Vine producers do it.

How to Use Instagram in a Genius Way (and Grow Your Audience) [from Ann Handley]

“Instagram allows you to hone your storytelling skills by giving you the necessary—and instant—feedback by how your followers respond (or don’t) to your posts. I’ve learned a lot about what kinds of ‘stories’ resonate in a broader sense—what truly gets my point of view across effectively—just by seeing how my followers there react and what they respond to.”

Retailers Use Social to Spur Shopping, Research [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Now that retailers are accepting that the average shopper isn’t flocking to social media to purchase, they’re realizing that social can be a valuable research tool, and the opinions of online friends can be persuasive.”

The Eight Phases of Brand Love [from Harvard Business Review; written by  Tim Halloran]

“Commitment, intimacy, dependability—she felt all of these, not about Diet Coke, but from it. She loved it as a constant companion, a support mechanism and a celebratory friend. At the time, I thought this was preposterous. We can’t connect with products the same way we connect with people!

But I’ve since learned that in many important ways, that is just what we do. Academic study after academic study has proven it. We don’t just consume or interact with brands. We actually engage in relationships with them.”

Everything you need to know about Twitter’s advertising options [from Social Media Explorer; written by Ben Harper]

If you’re in the UK and looking to advertise on Twitter, this is a must-read for you.

A Paid Search First? Olympic Sponsor Visa Opts To Advertise Its Tumblr On Google, Bing and Yahoo [from Search Engine Land; written by Ginny Marvin]

“Visa also appears to be the only major Olympic sponsor to have made Tumblr its Olympic content hub. From its Tumblr account, Visa links to all of its other social channels and features video and other content assets that are distributed across the other networks, including Facebook where it has over 12 million fans.”

How to Tap Into the Purchasing Power of Millennials with Social Media [from Business 2 Community; written by Scott Scanlon]

“The driving force behind social commerce can be attributed to the Millennial generation’s penchant for social media. Numbering 76 million strong, Millennials, also known as Generation Y, are defined as the demographic cohort born between 1980 and 2000. Their size and combined purchasing power make Millennials a necessary market segment for the future success of most companies.”

For what reasons do Millennials follow a brand’s social accounts?

Study: Social Media Driving Hyper-Growth for SMBs [from Social Times; written by Kimberlee Morrison]

“According to the study, one in six SMBs on the grow are in what was referred to as hyper-growth mode. Indeed, companies experiencing hyper growth report a 73 percent increase in social media spend, indicating that social media is an effective tool for branding, generating word-of-mouth, content marketing and lead generation.”

Three Technology Revolutions [from Pew Internet]

“Three major technology revolutions have occurred during the period the Pew Research Center has been studying digital technology – and yet more are on the horizon.”

Get the stats on Broadband, Mobile, and Social from Pew.

Written by Sarah

February 14th, 2014 at 8:57 am

Find health support just a click away

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The state of our health isn’t deemed polite conversation by most of society. Navigating the line between getting support from friends and family when you’re going through a hard time and not being the weird uncle who always talks about their colon at Christmas dinner can take some adept balancing.

Fortunately, just as social platforms can serve as support networks for those making physical changes aimed at fitness, they can also serve as support networks for those living with health issues from the temporary (How do I work out with a broken leg?) to those living with chronic illness (How do I restructure my life with this?).

Reaching out on Twitter

Building a supportive community on Twitter is one of the things that makes the platform the most worthwhile, and it can make a huge difference when a recently diagnosed person is able to surround themselves with supportive people dealing with similar health issues a few tweets away. Reaching out can start with browsing this master list of tweet chats and joining in whichever feel most comfortable; general health chats might point to more specific ones, and it’s hard not to find someone to connect with in most tweet chats. Doctors and other medical professionals sometimes host tweet chats in order to help answer questions from the general public. Building twitter lists of who participates in which chats, or is the most helpful in pointing out resources can help sort a barrage of new information.

There are also specific accounts dedicated to any number of health issues; Invisible Illness Wk, for example, connects those living with invisible illnesses in addition to raising awareness of the issues those will invisible, chronic illnesses face to those who are unfamiliar.

On other platforms

Sometimes there’s nothing more helpful than reading about someone else’s experience dealing with what you’re currently going through. Tumblr offers the same capabilities as a blog, but socially enhanced with reblogging and private messaging options, allowing one blog to draw from and connect with another easily, building up a support network without ever leaving the site.

For particular chronic illnesses, medical professionals will often point those newly diagnosed to message boards specific to a certain condition or related conditions. Inspire.com has a range of different communities that offer support, for example.

YouTube is also a popular platform for sharing experiences and getting feedback. Popular YouTuber Hank Green has shared his experience of living with a chronic illness, and the comments show many viewers grateful to see their own experiences mirrored in his video, especially from someone well-regarded and popular.

The bottom line

Ultimately social media helps connect those whose health might keep them from being able to attend a physical support group, and to supplement and organize the information and support they might receive from other sources.

Written by Sarah

February 12th, 2014 at 9:26 am

#SochiProblems slows down while general Olympic chatter picks up

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#SochiProblems slows down, but doesn’t stop.

As the 2014 Olympic Winter Games got officially underway over the weekend, mentions of #SochiProblems finally went into decline, as the general conversation around the event itself picked up.

Friday we shared updated #SochiProblems numbers, and though daily #SochiProblems tweets have gone down (that peaked on Friday with over 100k tweets), overall the hashtag is still huge: 311.9k tweets from over 200k contributors, with a reach of 89.3 million unique Twitter accounts. That’s all since the first #SochiProblems tweet was sent on January 31st.

General Olympic chatter picks up

If you look at tweets using the #SochiOlympics tag, 16.1k tweets have been made since February 6th; the day before the games officially started, but did begin airing in the western hemisphere due to the roughly 10-hour time difference (local Sochi time vs. U.S. Central Time).

One of the most retweeted #SochiOlympics tweets comes from New York Times staff photographer Doug Mills, and shows a U.S. athlete celebrating after a bronze medal win:

4 out of the top 5 accounts contributing to the conversation around the #SochiOlympics are news-related accounts: The New York Times (@nytimes), Times of India (@timesofindia),  Good Morning America (@GMA), and The Los Angeles Times (@latimes). The other one? A women’s humor account. Which might explain why #SochiProblems is the second most popular hashtag in tweets also hashtagged #SochiOlympics.

I guess we’ll see if the games’ problems can be eclipsed by the games themselves as the month goes on; the last day of the games is February 23.

Written by Sarah

February 10th, 2014 at 3:58 pm

#SochiProblems just keep rolling in

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Sochi has a lot more than 99 problems, it would seem. We wrote about the #SochiProblems hashtag yesterday and we’ve continued to dig into the numbers more. Since the first #SochiProblems tweet was sent on January 31st, more than 130k tweets have been sent with the hashtag by 81k different people, reaching over 50 million unique Twitter accounts. And that’s just as of about 10am PST today; the numbers just keep going up.

And the new most retweeted #SochiProblems tweet is pretty good:

It looks like the 2014 Winter Olympics are going to be very interesting!

Written by Sarah

February 7th, 2014 at 10:20 am

The Week in Social Analytics #88

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Your Brand Is the Sum of the Stories We Tell About You [from Mack Collier]

“If you connect with your fans, the customers that love you, those fans will work with you to make sure they tell the story about your brand that you want other customers to hear.  Read that again until you understand just how important that is.”

Emphasis original.

5 Twitter Best Practices to Humanize Your Brand [from Social Media Today; written by Monica Jade Romeri]

Humans like to connect with other humans, not faceless corporate robots. (That’s why Merle has a face.)

The Confluence Of Content And Social Media: Insights For Success In 2014 [from Forbes; written by Jayson DeMers]

“One overarching theme in recent research is the benefit of properly targeting your social media efforts. If you want a better understanding of how social media influences your customers’ decisions to purchase your products and services, there are a few important questions that you’ve got to ask. In this case, a bit of smart consumer research will go a long way toward directing your social media strategy.”

6 Reasons Every Brand Should Create Social Video [from Social Times; written by Constance Aguilar]

“Video is quickly becoming the most effective brand marketing tool, and its popularity will continue to rise in 2014. Already 40 percent of the top 1,000 most popular Instagram videos are from brands, and a branded Vine video is four times more likely to be seen than a regular branded video.”

Millennials’ Social Media Posts Influence Peers to Buy New Products [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Millennials are significantly more likely than older generations to be influenced by their friends’ social media posts about products and services. According to January 2014 polling conducted by Harris Interactive for The Webby Awards, 68% of 18-to-34-year-old social media users surveyed were at least somewhat likely to make a purchase after seeing a friend’s post.”

Social Media and Millennials: How They Shop [from Heidi Cohen]

“Less than 1 in 6 social media influenced millennials shop exclusively in stores.”

If this is your target demographic and you’re selling on social, be sure you’re engaging in a timely, human way with your customers and followers, and be doubly sure all transaction processes are set up to run smoothly.

STUDY: Interacting With Other Brands Makes Consumers More Loyal [from PR Newser; written by Patrick Coffee]

“Here’s what we take from these findings: brands shouldn’t be afraid of competitors targeting their most loyal consumers. In fact, they might even want to encourage it. In many cases, trying something different just reminds you why you prefer your favorites.”

And finally, a bonus roundup of some posts on social media myths:

Busting The Myths of Social Media and Content Marketing [Geekless Tech] 

6 Social Media Marketing Myths To Avoid [Business2Community]

Written by Sarah

February 7th, 2014 at 8:42 am

The Winter Olympics are having #SochiProblems

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The Olympics pose a challenge no matter which country is hosting the winter or summer games, and Russia has seen its fair share of stumbles this week as press started to arrive and found their hotels incomplete or lacking essentials such as usable water, among other things.

Tweets like the one above quickly started using the hashtag #SochiProblems (and a lot of them have been replicated by the @SochiProblems account). Since January 31, when the first #SochiProblems tweet was posted by @2_TrishTheDish, 49k tweets have posted with the hashtag (as of about 11:30 a.m. PST on February 6). That includes tweets from more than 30.7k contributors, and a reach of 26.5 million unique Twitter account — and those numbers are growing quickly.

The most retweeted tweet came from the aforementioned @SochiProblems account, and has been retweeted a total of 971 times so far:

Since many of the #SochiProblems are coming from reporters and other media people in town for the event, many of the top contributors to the conversation are news organizations and other media people sympathizing: @NBCNews, the @TODAYshow, @AJEnglish, the @HuffingtonPost, and @ninagarcia of Marie Claire magazine were all in the top ten contributors to #SochiProblems.

Hopefully things will get sorted out as the games get fully underway. We’ll keep you posted on all the Olympic Twitter action here, so stay tuned! From the comfort of your own home or finished office, hopefully.

 

Written by Sarah

February 6th, 2014 at 11:39 am