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Snapchat for brands part II: Brands who do it well

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We’ve already covered the basics of how Snapchat works and some of the specifics for how brands should be using the app, so now we wanted to show examples of how some different brands have been using snaps and stories to connect with their fans and followers. Consider their work as a guide and inspiration for how you might want to use Snapchat yourself.

Taco Bell

Taco Bell was one of the first brands to embrace using Snapchat, behind a yogurt chain called 16 Handles who used the platform to send out coupons. Taco Bell initially the app to advertise its Beefy Crunch Burrito:

And since then has used the new features that launched in May to start a Doodle War with its Snapchat friends, among other things:

Mashable

Mashable uses Snapchat as a way to show some behind-the-scenes office culture- birthday celebrations, etc- and more of what the company is up to, such as events they’re attending, like in the snap below:

Photo 6-25-14, 11 59 11 AM

Mashable is a good example of how using simple enhancements like the pencil tool in several layers of text can make a snap more vibrant and interesting. To ramp up engagement, they have also hosted weekly Snapchat Challenges, like this emoji challenge:

MTV

MTV uses Snapchat as a way to share brief interviews with and photos of different celebrities and artists with their Snapchat friends, and to do show promotions like their first ever Snap promoting their show Teen Wolf. (MTVTeenWolf is now its own Snapchat account.) MTV UK previously used it as a way to promote their show Geordie Shore, the UK version of Jersey Shore.

A snap of Teen Wolf star, Tyler Posey.

Audi and Pretty Little Liars (PLL)

PLL teamed up with media sponsor Audi to send out snaps during episodes of the show meant to line up with certain scenes in the first campaign of its kind. PLL fans get exclusive content they can’t get anywhere else to enhance their favorite program, and Audi gets to introduce itself to a new and younger demographic. While that demographic might not be in the market for luxury cars now, they will have an established relationship with Audi for the future.

A fan response snap to PLL and Audi.

Pitch Perfect 2

The cast of the sequel to Pitch Perfect has been sending mostly behind-the-scenes selfies to their Snapchat friends, the same kind most users send to their Snapchat friends who double as IRL friends. This creates a sense of intimacy above what even a 10-second video interview from your favorite artist via MTV does; they’re framed so that it looks like the star themselves might have snapped the shot and sent it to you.

Anything else I should know?

Yes! Be sure you share your Snapchat username with your fans and followers on other social sites who might want to add you! Most audience members won’t think to search for brands there, so you need to be proactive about letting them know that you’re there.

And that’s about it.

Got any questions, or know of anything that we missed? Let us know in the comments!

Written by Sarah

June 30th, 2014 at 10:09 am

The Week in Social Analytics #108

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Gallup released a poll recently reporting that consumers aren’t that influenced by social media, but a closer look at the methodology reveals some problems:

Gallup’s Buzzy Social Media Report Appears ‘Deeply Flawed’: 2012 called and wants its data back [from Adweek; written by Christopher Heine]

“And Gallup told Adweek that some of the surveys were completed through snail mail, though the company would not say how many. While of course there’s nothing inherently wrong with conducting research this way, it’s difficult to imagine those respondents being on par with normal social media consumption. Brands employ social marketing to reach people who are actually there—not those who are not.

Emphasis added.

While the methodology of the Gallup poll is certainly questionable, ClickZ did get some good takeaways from it, in the form of actionable marketing lessons:

3 Social Media Marketing Takeaways From Gallup’s Study [from Clickz; written by Ashley Zeckman]

“Customers are people, not numbers. They want to be engaged and have trust in your brand before they’ll make a purchasing decision.

We also need to recognize that while there is a significant amount of value in utilizing social media as a marketing channel, we need to be realistic about what we will gain by interacting socially. We may not see immediate gratification (a conversion or purchase) but we’re spending time interacting where are customers are spending their time, and working to build trust in the process.”

Emphasis added.

This week also kicked off with some great pieces on storytelling: Storytelling For Business: The Only Difference Between You And The Competition Is The Story You Tell from Web.Search.Social, written by Carol Lynn Rivera, and Breaking Out of Boring: Tell Unexpected Stories from Ann Handley.

Word-of-Mouth Proves Highly Influential for Millennial Women [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Results from the survey of 1,100 American Millennial women without children also indicate that 93% have purchased a product after hearing about it from a family member of friend.

That’s a reflection of the trust they put in those recommendations: 89% said they trust recommendations from a friend, peer or family member more than from a brand.”

Why Brands Don’t Respond on Social Media [from Social Times; written by Richard Dumas]

“. . .while more than 68 percent of businesses recognize social media as a necessary service channel, 60 percent of companies are not formally supporting social customer care.”

You need to be where your customers are.

Your Customers Control Your Brand [from Spin Sucks; written by Gini Dietrich]

“While you can help motivate your customers to talk about you in a good way, ultimately they are the ones who control the message.

Your canned messages are no longer enough.

Yes, the things you, your executive team, your sales team, and your employees are saying about the brand should be consistent.

But you also have to be open to listening to how your customers describe your organization, your products, or your services.

If they perceive it differently than you do, it’s time to rethink your messaging and your brand positioning.”

Are You Ready For Multi-Platform Social Media Use? [from Heidi Cohen]

“Therefore, use a mix of different social media platforms with tailored messages to ensure your marketing reaches your target prospects where and when they spend their time.”

Getting Started Guide: Tumblr for Small Businesses [from Business2Community; written by Taylor Loren]

A great guide for small businesses just getting started on Tumblr.

Written by Sarah

June 27th, 2014 at 9:13 am

Snapchat for brands part I: The basics & brand specifics

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The trend of platforms providing a place for users to exchange ephemeral content isn’t an obvious one for most brands to join in on; after all, why spend hours planning and executing content only to have it disappear in moments once it hits your audience’s screens? But just like any other social platform, if Snapchat is where your target demographic is, then it’s where you should be spending some of your time. If that’s the case- or you’re just a marketer or brand who loves to experiment- read on to find out all you need to know about marketing on Snapchat for brands.

What do I need to know before getting started?

If you’re already familiar with Snapchat then you can skip this section and head straight for the second section. Otherwise stick around for a basic breakdown of how the platform works.

The very basics: Snapchat scores & finding friends

Your score is simply the total number of snaps you have sent and received, as per Snapchat themselves. That’s all there is to it!

As for finding friends, Snapchat has step-by-step instructions for how to find and add friends that includes screenshots. You can add those who have added you, and find friends via your contacts, or through searching for their Snapchat username.

Stories vs. individual Snaps

Every time you take a snap you have the option to add it to “My Story”- a collection of snaps that add up to tell a bigger story and are viewable for 24 hours- and stories are now more popular than snaps. Stories are also a better choice for brands above sending individual snaps, and we’ll discuss this more in the next section.

Our Story

Snapchat just launched a new feature called “Our Story” that is meant to let Snapchatters collaborate on a bigger story around an event they are physically attending. At the moment the first and only event to have “Our Story” is the Electric Daisy Carnival, but the wording on the page about the feature suggests it will be open to other events in the future. People who aren’t currently attending an “Our Story” event can still add the event as a friend to view the ongoing, collaborative story so they don’t miss out on the experience entirely. This is a great way for event organizers and attendees to persuade them to attend in the future.

Replaying Snaps

You can only replay one snap every 24 hours, so choose carefully! Also keep in mind that your audience can only do the same; that’s important to keep in mind if you’re designing a Snapchat contest or sending coupons.

Notifications

Snapchat notifies the sender of a snap whenever a recipient takes a screenshot of their snap or a chat between them. They have different icons to let you know if your snaps and chats have been sent, viewed, and more. Snapchat will also notify you if someone replays a snap.

And that’s it for the basics; if you have more questions you can find answers to them in Snapchat’s own support site.

What do I need to know specifically as a brand?

This is where we get into the specifics for brands using Snapchat; while creating consistently intriguing content is a given, there are also different settings you’ll want to consider than if you were using Snapchat for personal reasons.

Settings

In your settings you’ll want to make sure that you set “Who is allowed to view my story?” to “Everyone”. Otherwise only those you’ve added as “My Friends” will be able to see it, and you’ll be missing out on voluntary eyeballs until you manually add everyone who adds you. With a popular brand that could be quite an undertaking.

The manual aspect of individual snaps can be a daunting prospect for brands- as of now there’s no way to create a single snap and click on a “send to all” option; you have to go through your list and choose each recipient individually-  but the workaround is adding all of the content you create to your story. (Whether or not you choose to let your audience send you snaps back is up to you, and would mostly be useful in terms of building engagement through reciprocation they can see- the icon will let them know you viewed their snap- or in conducting a Snapchat contest. The option of who is allowed to send you snaps is controlled in “Settings”.)

Also be sure to check out “Manage” under “Additional Services” to turn on the “Front-Facing Flash”, “Replay” option, and enable “Special Text”, all of which will enhance the content of your snaps.

Kinds of content to post

Truly creative content is what makes Snapchat sing, so you’ll want to plan and execute content using all of the features we mentioned earlier to make your snaps as interesting as possible:

  • Draw on your photos using the pencil icon in the upper right-hand corner using the full range of colors available; this gives you the ability to turn your snaps into just about anything

  • Tap on the screen to add text; turning on special text lets you alter it to be larger and adjust the positioning

  • If you have an emoji keyboard on your phone, Snapchat will support adding these characters in with your text

Other than utilizing those features, the kind of content you want to share will depend on your brand and what your goals are with the platform. Is it to share behind-the-scenes company culture? Is it to share brief behind-the-scenes interviews and photos with the stars of your show or movie? Is it to show off your products in new and interesting ways?

We’ll look at a few different types of brands using Snapchat in the next post to give you some ideas of what kind of content has been successful.

Frequency of snaps

While regular snaps are limited to a maximum time limit of 10 seconds, stories aren’t limited except to a 24 hour period of existence. However, since Snapchat was built to be a quick and fleeting experience, you might not want to be the first to discover what the limits of a story are. Keep it simple, sweet, and relatively short; set up stories of different lengths and see if you get an increase in activity around one type or length above others.

What do we mean by increased activity? Well, measuring Snapchat is difficult, but pay attention to things like how many people are adding you to their friend list, taking screenshots, choosing to replay your snaps, or even sending you snaps in reply if you choose to make that option available.

Anything else?

That’s it for now! Check out the basics in the first section of this post if you need to, or stick around for our next post covering which brands use Snapchat well. If you still have questions, leave ‘em in the comments!

Written by Sarah

June 26th, 2014 at 8:40 am

The Week in Social Analytics #107

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

7 best practices for using GIFs and cinemagraphs for business [from The Next Web; written by Brian Honigman]

“Don’t create this media just for the sake of doing it, but look to create GIFs and cinemagraphs that sync with your campaigns, as well as your consistent product or service offerings.”

How You Can Use Instagram in Your Business [Business 2 Community; written by Renee Shupe]

“Inject some personality into your marketing efforts. Even businesses that provide services or create products that are not ‘pretty’ enough for Instagram can use the service to their advantage by showcasing their human side. Simple photos of you and your team in action will be interesting to many users, especially if they are accompanied by a fun or thought-provoking caption. It’s also good to show your business engaging in charitable work. You could even post photos of your employees or clients along with brief profiles.”

Pinterest Vs Instagram: Visual Content Marketing [from Heidi Cohen]

Check what your competitors are doing on Pinterest and Instagram. What are they doing that’s successful that you’re not? Also check out the top performers on each platform. Take note of ideas that are worth adapting and making your own.”

The minimalist’s guide to boosting brands’ Instagram engagement [from The Next Web; written by Eric Dahan]

“A brand’s greatest challenge is communicating a sincere message to its followers with each and every Instagram post. A successful grassroots campaign prioritizes quality over quantity; therefore, while multiple hashtags will naturally yield higher potential reach, one or two incentive hashtags will generate better follower engagement.”

Should My Brand Be Active on Tumblr? [from Social Media Today; written by Margaret Murphy]

Visibility. Tumblr incorporates tagging and blog categorization to help users find the subjects they’re interested in. Many blogs garner so much attention online that they have even led to book deals. Have you ever heard of the book ‘Stuff White People Like’? How about ‘Humans of New York’? These both started as Tumblrs.”

Social Brands: The Future Of Marketing In 127 Slides [from Viral Blog; written by Igor Beuker]

“Don’t chase social channels like race dogs on steroids. Certainly not based on reach. Claim your domain, go big, go niche or go home.

The brands that will succeed in the future won’t just give back to communities; they’ll actively build and nurture communities.”

Millennials Lead the Way in Sharing Product and Service Info on Social Media [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Millennials were 22% more likely than the rest of the respondents to report having shared a link to a product or service on social media (39% vs. 32%), and 52% more likely to have posted a picture of a product or service (38% vs. 25%). “

5 Grammar Rules You Can Break on Social Media [from Likeable Media; written by Theresa Braun]

You’ve got to learn the rules in order to responsibly break them.

Welcome to the Era of Surround Storytelling [Edelman Digital; written by Jimmie Stone and Kendra Eash]

“How exactly do we show up differently and tell a brand story that still makes sense in this incredibly windy, fragmented environment?”

Written by Sarah

June 20th, 2014 at 9:16 am

3 dos and don’ts for running a campaign across platforms

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Every social media platform has its own way of operating that stems from its users reasons for being there; the same person might use Twitter mostly for professional work connections and news, Facebook for family updates, Instagram to connect with friends, and Tumblr to keep up with the fandoms around their favorite shows, for example. If that person matches the ideal customer for a brand and that brand wants to run a social campaign across most or all of those platforms to reach that person, they need to tailor their message for each place.

How? Get started with these do’s and don’ts.

1. Don’t: discount a platform because you think you know what people are there for.

Do: The research to see how conversations form around things that matter to your brand. Instagram, for example, is often thought of as a place where people simply share photos with friends and family, but that’s not necessarily the case. Big events like the World Cup have enormous conversations happening around them on the photo-sharing site, and smart brands like Adidas have caught onto that.

Our Instagram analysis* showed that Adidas was a top publisher around the World Cup conversation on Instagram, and they received 22.7k actions (likes and comments) on their 5 World Cup related posts, earning 6.3 million impressions. That’s a big return on a relatively small effort, especially considering fan-run sports accounts and even official soccer athlete accounts are making anywhere from 14-128 posts related to the World Cup.

 2. Don’t: assume you know how to talk the talk.

Do: Listen first, then join the conversation respectfully. Tumblr, for example, has many different communities that all have different ways of speaking to each other, making jokes, and presenting information, all of which is part of the larger Tumblr community and culture. What works well in Twitter or Facebook advertising will not work well here; the users are part of a larger creative community and they respond well to brands who take the time to understand how Tumblr really operates (or they’re smart enough to hire and work with someone who does).

Denny’s, for example, has an extremely popular Tumblr that users have responded well to because it speaks in the language of Tumblr. It isn’t just an attempt to ape it.

Denny's Tumblr

3. Don’t: Be afraid to experiment.

Do: Learn from and build on your failures and successes alike. FIFA has a Twitter account for their official match ball. While normally inanimate objects spontaneously get their own parody Twitter accounts following a big cultural event with social coverage (Pharrell’s hat following the GRAMMY’s, for example), FIFA decided to give their match ball its own autonomy and hashtag early.

Running a quick free TweetReach report shows that the conversation and engagement around #ballin is already good, and there’s still more than a month of World Cup matches left to go. While something like a snapshot report gives a good idea of the general success of the account relative to the hashtag- it’s not just a bunch of people using the term in other, World Cup unrelated ways- more in-depth monitoring could tell FIFA what was successful and unsuccessful in their approach specific to Twitter, and help them plan better for next time. (You can read more about how to monitor a Twitter campaign with TweetReach here.)

So what does this mean for campaigns, exactly?

The bottom line is that you have to tailor your message to fit in each place, and that can only be done by taking the time to understand how the conversation around what your audience is interested in operates. Adidas looked at how sports fans use Instagram, Denny’s hired someone familiar with the culture of Tumblr and gave them the freedom to do it right, and FIFA is experimenting with giving their match ball its own voice.

After you’ve decided on the messaging for each platform- visual for Instagram and Tumblr, with different wording and approach on Twitter, for example- build goals based on how the audience you aim to reach in each place talks to one another about you or your industry. Are you there to increase your share of voice in the industry (here’s more on how to measure share of voice, and how to grow it), or to build engagement with your existing fans, while hopefully earning new ones? Your goals for the same campaign might be different for each platform, which increases the necessity for tailored messages in each place. 

The basic approach is the same in each place, however: Research, plan, test, measure, rinse, and repeat.

 

*Interested in our Union Metrics for Instagram analytics? Learn more here

Written by Sarah

June 18th, 2014 at 7:58 am

Important update: Please change your TweetReach password

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Last night, a laptop was stolen from one of our engineers. We took immediate action to ensure that all our systems were secure and there is no evidence of any compromise. But as a security precaution, we recommend you change your TweetReach or Union Metrics password right away.

TweetReach users can change their passwords here: https://tweetreach.com/user/edit

Union Metrics for Tumblr or Union Metrics for Instagram users can log in here: https://app.unionmetrics.com/. Then click the user icon in the top right corner to access your user profile.

While access to the laptop is password protected, it did contain a partial data export from two of our user databases. No credit card, financial information or analytics data was involved in any way, and all stored passwords are one-way encrypted using a cryptographic hash and a technique called “salting” which protects you even if you used the same password on other sites. Your password cannot be decrypted, so the risk to your personal information is quite low. However, it is possible that usernames and email addresses could be accessed, though they have not yet been. Changing your password will eliminate any possibility of a data breach, however unlikely.

We are extremely sorry for this inconvenience, and we have taken every step possible to ensure that your data is secure and your identity is protected, now and in the future.

We will be here if you have any questions, so please email or call any time.

support@unionmetrics.com
888-834-8113

Written by Jenn D

June 13th, 2014 at 4:21 pm

Posted in News

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The Week in Social Analytics #106

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

First: Edelman Digital’s new Entertainment Study is out this week.

The Best and Worst of Real-Time Marketing: 4 Lessons for Marketers  [from Fast Company; written by Ekaterina Walter]

Stay relevant and add value- in the right tone- while also enhancing customer service.

How Big Brands Keep Their Social Media Audiences Engaged [from Social Media Examiner; written by Lisa Furgison]

Learn from the biggest and best.

Getting Started With Social Video | Infographic [from Business2Community; written by Megan Ritter]

“Research shows that YouTube works well for How-To guides and instruction videos, while Instagram & Vine allow users short snippets of video; perfect for for announcing an upcoming event or generating interest in a brand new product.

Google Hangouts have proven to be more suitable for business-to-business marketing. Vimeo prides itself in high-quality videos.”

New Research Article: “How Do Health Researchers Use Social Media?” [from The Library Journal; written by Gary Price]

“As the United States moves forward with health reform, the communication gap between researchers and policy makers will need to be narrowed to promote policies informed by evidence.

Social media represent an expanding channel for communication. Academic journals, public health agencies, and health care organizations are increasingly using social media to communicate health information. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now regularly tweets to 290,000 followers.”

Using Social Media for Restaurant Marketing [from Social Media Today; written by Lauren Marinigh]

The most powerful social tools for restaurants are visual, such as Instagram:

“Take photos of your daily or weekly specials to share with the Instagram world, take customers behind the scenes in the kitchen with how you prepare or make some of your menu items, educate the Instagram world on different fun facts on how you are sustainable. Ideas for Instagram are endless for the food venue and one of the most valuable tools you can have.”

Is Instagram Your Visual Content Marketing Superpower? [from Heidi Cohen]

“Georgia Tech and Yahoo Labs researchers found Instagram photos containing faces were 38% more likely to receive likes and 32% more likely to receive comments, even after controlling for social network reach and activity. However, the number of faces, their ages and gender in the photo didn’t have an effect.”

10 Tips to Improve Your Pinterest Marketing Strategy [from Social Mouths; written by William Johnson]

“Before you start, ask yourself these 4 important questions:

  • Is your business visual?
  • Do you have access to images?
  • Is your target market primarily female?
  • Can your website be easily updated with images and content?”

3 Easy Ways Startups Can Use Twitter to Perform Marketing Research [from Social Media Today; written by Ray Wang]

“By leveraging Twitter, start-ups can. . .listen to their target audience’s conversations and learn about their problems, dissatisfactions, and product features they desire. This marketing research approach can help start-ups discover new business opportunities and unravel overlooked problems.”

Why Apple Doesn’t Tweet [from KISSMetrics; written by Sherice Jacob]

“On the surface, it’s difficult to glean any shred of insight from Apple’s hands-off social strategy. True, when innovation and premium experience are the hallmarks you want to be known for, then being a chatty Cathy on social media clashes against that brand image. There’s also the aspect of control. When you keep a tightly-run ship, it’s hard for leaks to penetrate. Still, there’s no excuse for sticking your digital head in the sand and hoping no one notices your failures. Perhaps Apple feels better equipped to handle the customer experience in its stores rather than on its screens.”

Written by Sarah

June 13th, 2014 at 9:19 am

10 tips for live-tweeting sports events

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Photo from the official FIFA World Cup Instagram account. Check official accounts other than Twitter to see how the conversation is going across platforms.

The World Cup kicks off today, and with other exciting sports events on the horizon- the NBA Finals, Stanley Cup, US Open, and more World Cup this weekend alone- we thought we’d expand our 9 tips for watching TV on Twitter to include, specifically, sports events:

  1. Definitely announce ahead of time if you’re going to be live-tweeting a game so your followers who can’t watch in real-time can mute you or avoid Twitter as a whole. Sports fans do not take kindly to being spoiled on events they plan to watch later.
  2. Related: “Do not tweet spoilers” is a trickier rule with sports events; after all, how else can you talk about what is going on if you’re not referring to the plays that are being made and how that can or is affecting the game? With enough warning ahead of time that you intend to live-tweet, and use of official hashtags so your followers can mute event-related tweets, you should be fine talking about everything that’s happening in the game.
  3. Check for an official hashtag. These days it’s rarer that a big event won’t have its own hashtag already set up; check official accounts to see which ones they’re using to talk about events and excitement leading up to the big game. @FIFAWorldCup is keeping it simple with #WorldCup this year for the event as a whole, but they’re also using other hashtags for individual matches: #BRACRO for Brazil vs. Croatia, for example.
  4. Mention official accounts for the teams playing, individual players, the organizers, or even the event itself, if applicable. You never know when you might get a retweet, and those accounts often have a large following. (You can find them by searching Twitter for the show name and choosing the official account that pops up with a verified checkmark, or by going to a team or organization’s website – social profiles are usually prominently displayed.)
  5. If you already have a large following for something unrelated to sports- you’re popular YA author John Green, for example- you might consider setting up a second account for live-tweeting sports events, so those who follow you for the latest news about your book-to-movie adaptations won’t have to mute you every time a game comes on, and you can even potentially reach new fans who are sports fanatics.
  6. Interact with other people talking about the game to enrich your conversation, which should help you find new accounts to follow related to your favorite sports teams, events, organizations and more.
  7. That said sports talk can be contentious, so don’t be afraid to mute someone who is especially volatile, or even block them if they become excessively aggressive or rude.
  8. If you’re having a party to watch the game with friends, consider posting pictures of your setup, and include guest’s handles in your tweets. Some event sponsors have contests around using their products in watch parties, so check those out ahead of time to see if you can win something for a party you were planning to throw anyway!
  9. Share your content to other networks like Tumblr and Instagram. If you’re trying to build a following around live-tweeting games (something you could translate into writing articles, perhaps) you might consider condensing the best of your live-tweets into a story and putting them on your Tumblr, or using Instagram to share a visual live-tweeting of your watch party. But be careful of auto-sharing everything you post elsewhere; those who follow you in multiple places might get bothered by the redundancy and decide to unfollow you. It’s great to cross-post some, but be selective.
  10. Related to that: See what the conversation is like about these events on other networks. What’s the World Cup conversation like on Tumblr, or Instagram? Seeing how people talk about it in those places can give you new outlets to discuss your favorite sports, new ideas for how to talk about them, and new accounts and people to connect and share with.

Do you tweet while you watch sports? Got any tips we missed? Tell us how you do it in the comments below!

Written by Sarah

June 12th, 2014 at 1:02 pm

Posted in Events,Guides

Tagged with ,

The first Vine from space

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NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman posted the first Vine from space this weekend, condensing hours on the ISS and an orbit showing a never-quite-setting sun into six seconds:

Social media has been the perfect tool for NASA to use to educate the public about their work, and give curious citizens direct access in real time to the astronauts living and working in space above us. The Vine was shared by many in the Twitter science community dedicated to science education and outreach:

After all, the projects started up there often come back down to earth to be used in our daily lives, and new windows into science education are the best way to spark the interest of the next generation of scientists and inventors.

Written by Sarah

June 10th, 2014 at 12:39 pm

The Week in Social Analytics #105

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Three Ways to Tell Stories With Data [from Edelman Digital; written by Brittany Dow]

The answer to every data visualization isn’t an infographic.

“The key is focusing on what you’re trying to accomplish and then determining the best medium (hat tip to Marshall McLuhan).

Connecting with your audience, whether speaking to them on an emotional or intellectual level, will always trump marketing messages.”

Three Steps Towards Developing an Authentic Brand Voice in Social Media [from Social Media Today; written by Andrew Hutchison]

“The key is understanding your target audience, knowing what information they’re seeking – as opposed to the information you want to tell them – and communicating that in line with a consistent brand mission to guide the way, underlining your brand purpose with every interaction.”

Last week Mary Meeker’s 2014 Internet Trends report [KPCB] came out, and this week saw more great summaries of it, highlighting different areas of the constantly changing digital landscape. Check out: The 10 Internet Trend Charts You Need To See From Mary Meeker from B2B Marketing Insider, and  Thoughts on Mary Meeker’s 2014 Internet Trends Report from Edelman Digital.

A few more good research reports also came out:

There were also a lot of great pieces around Instagram out this week:

Written by Sarah

June 6th, 2014 at 9:26 am