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TweetReach Tip: Why some tweets generate fewer impressions

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On Twitter, replies are handled differently than regular tweets. An @reply is a tweet sent to a specific user, beginning with that user’s Twitter handle. Like this:

Replies are only received by the users who follow both the sender and the receipient. The above tweet was delivered to the 6 Twitter accounts who follow both @tweetreachapp and @Melaina25, not to all of @tweetreachapp’s 4,300+ followers.

So, if there’s a contributor or tweet in your TweetReach snapshot report or Tracker that has only generated a few impressions, even though you know the account has hundreds or thousands of followers, then the tweet is most likely an @reply. The purpose of a reply is to continue a conversation between two Twitter accounts, and as such, replies are only delivered to users who follow both the Twitter accounts involved in the conversation. Twitter does this to keep your stream from getting overly cluttered with irrelevant conversations you’re not involved in. So even if an account has thousands of followers, an @reply will only appear to users who follow both the sender and recipients, and will generate as many impressions as there are common followers.

There’s more on how Twitter handles replies on their blog. Basically, using your Twitter client’s reply button or arrow will limit the people who receive your tweet to only users who follow both accounts in the discussion, even if you add a space, period or other punctuation in front of the username. If you want a tweet to be delivered to all your followers, do not use the reply button and do not start the tweet with a username.

 

Written by Jenn D

September 4th, 2012 at 9:51 am

Posted in Help

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TweetReach Tip: Measuring the reach of a Twitter account

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Want to measure the reach of a particular Twitter account? Great – you’ve come to the right place! Our TweetReach snapshot reports can measure the reach of any public Twitter account in just a few seconds. And depending on exactly which tweets you want to include in your analysis, we have a few tips for writing your search queries.

From and About

The From and About report is our most often run report and measures all tweets to, from and about an account. Use this query:

@username OR from:username

This report will return all mentions of that Twitter account (including all types of retweets, replies and mentions), as well as all tweets from that Twitter account. This is the most comprehensive set of reach stats for a Twitter account, and covers all activity with and about an username. We call this the From and About report, because it returns data both from a Twitter account, as well as about a Twitter account. Here’s an example From and About report.

About

The About report will include all mentions, replies and retweets of an account. Use this query with the @ symbol:

@username

This report will let you know how many people are talking about a certain Twitter account, and the ways they’re talking about it (retweets, replies and mentions). It will not include original tweets posted from the account. We call this the About report, since it only returns tweets about an account from other Twitter users. Here’s an example About report.

From

The From report will return only tweets from that account. Use this query with the from: operator:

from:username

This reports is useful for measuring the impact of an individual Twitter account without the noise of mentions and other users’ interaction, and it’s great for learning more about the kinds of tweets that account is posting. We call this the From report, since it only includes tweets from that Twitter account. Here’s an example From report.

From and Retweet

Finally, sometimes you want to know only about an account’s tweets and any retweets of those tweets. The From and Retweet report uses this query:

from:username OR “RT @username”

This report will return tweets from an account, as well as any retweets of that account. This is useful for measuring the impact of an account’s tweets and its retweets, without including other mentions or replies. We call this the From and Retweet report, since it only includes original tweets and retweets. Here’s an example From and Retweet report.

Written by Jenn D

August 21st, 2012 at 12:21 pm

Posted in Help

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Announcing our new and improved TweetReach Pro dashboard

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We’re so excited to unveil our brand new TweetReach Pro dashboard!

The new dashboard allows you to quickly find overall stats for your account, compare metrics across Trackers, explore how your Trackers have been performing over the past 30 days, review recently run snapshot reports, and so much more. Plus, it looks better than ever…

A few things you can do with the new dashboard:

  • Surface Tracker stats for our four main metrics in the graph
  • Review Tracker stats for any day in the past month
  • Reorder your Trackers
  • Select and deselect Trackers to display in graph
  • Set up new Trackers
  • Drill into and edit existing Trackers
  • Explore recently-run snapshot reports
  • Run new snapshot reports
  • View overall account stats, including total all-time tweets analyzed and the number of active Trackers, snapshot reports and account users

There’s more detail about what you can do with your dashboard (and how to do it) on our helpdesk. And as always, please let us know if you have any questions.

Written by Jenn D

August 9th, 2012 at 2:37 pm

Posted in Help,News

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Trackers now have smarter URL search!

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Good news! Our TweetReach Pro Trackers now support smarter URL search with the url_contains: operator. You can add one or more URL queries to your tracked terms. A few examples:

  • url_contains:bit.ly/123abc
  • url_contains:blog.tweetreach.com/2012/08
  • url_contains:”http://tweetreach.com”
  • url_contains:tweetreach.com report

The Tracker will find any tweets that include the matched portion of the URL you include in your query. Like this:

The above url_contains:tweetreach.com query will find any mention of a tweetreach.com link, including subpages like http://tweetreach.com/plans.

A few notes on how to use this operator in your own Trackers… The url_contains: operator will find all public tweets where the URL you’re searching for has been actually pasted into the tweet, even if it’s been t.co shortened. But it will not find tweets where the URL was shortened before pasting into a tweet. Also, if you include a URL with http:// in your query, you’ll need to add quotation marks around the URL itself, like in the example above (no need to add quotes around other URL segments though; this only impacts those with the colon). You can also add other keywords to a query with a url_contains filter. Questions about any of this? Just ask!

Trackers, which monitor new and future tweets in real-time, are available in TweetReach Pro. Read more about what you can search for in a Tracker.

Written by admin

August 7th, 2012 at 1:11 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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What is TweetReach?

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Here’s a quick video explaining what TweetReach is and how it can help you measure your – or your campaign’s – impact on Twitter.

Still have questions? Just ask!

Written by Jenn D

June 18th, 2012 at 6:31 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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Today’s TweetReach Tip: When tweets are available for analysis

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One of the questions we’re often asked is when tweets are available for analysis (and how long they’re accessible). We hear a lot of questions like:

  • Can I get tweets from last month? What about last year?
  • I have an event coming up – what’s the best way to measure those tweets?
  • What if I want to analyze only tweets from the past two days?
  • Can I track tweets for a month or longer?

So, here’s our answer to those questions. We have several different ways at TweetReach to access tweets, depending on when they were posted and how many tweets there are. First, we just need to know the answer to one question: when were your tweets posted? 

My tweets will be posted in the future

If your tweets will be posted anytime in the future, then we have the most flexibility for reporting. Anytime you can plan ahead for your Twitter tracking, it will be both easier and cheaper to get the tweet analytics you need. If your tweets will be posted in the future, whether it’s later today or not until next month, we have two ways to measure those tweets:

  1. Set up a Tracker before tweets are posted
  2. Run a snapshot report after tweets are posted

TweetReach Tracker will capture all tweets in real time, as they are posted to Twitter. So this means you need to set it up before tweets start going out. Trackers are perfect for longer or higher-volume campaigns, as well as for more in-depth metrics. Trackers don’t have any tweet or time limits*, so they can track as many tweets as you want, for as long as you want. We have some customers who have been tracking – and archiving – their tweets for two years! Trackers are available through TweetReach Pro.

The other option is to run a snapshot report after your event or campaign is over and all relevant tweets have been posted. A snapshot report will include basic Twitter analytics for up to 1,500 tweets from the past 7-10 days (whichever comes first). Snapshot reports are great for smaller, lower-volume, or shorter campaigns. You can run a snapshot report anytime at tweetreach.com. The first 50 tweets are free, and the full snapshot is $20.

So, set up a Tracker before your event if you’re expecting more than 1,500 tweets or want to track them for more than a week. Run a snapshot report after your event if you’re expecting fewer than 1,500 tweets over a week or less.

My tweets were posted in the past week

If the time period for your tweets is within the past few daysrun a one-time snapshot report. A snapshot TweetReach report will include up to 1,500 tweets from the past 7-10 days. This varies a little from query to query, but most are around a week. You can also limit these snapshots to specific dates from the past week using date filters. A snapshot including up to 50 tweets is free, and a full snapshot will be $20.

My tweets were posted more than a week ago

If the tweets were posted within the past month, then we can access those tweets through a custom TweetReach historical report. This works best for a single day or few day period from the past month, but can include tweets for up to 30 days back from today. These historical reports range in price, depending on the length of time and number of tweets being analyzed, but start at $200, and include full coverage of all tweets from your time period.

Contact us to discuss your specific needs and we can give you a precise quote. TweetReach Back is really best for Twitter analytics emergencies – when a client or coworker absolutely needs numbers and didn’t remember to tell you until now.

*Our lower-level TweetReach Pro plans have some soft tweet limits, but most people will never reach those limits. Please check with us if you want to know about these limits or if you plan on tracking a high-volume event.

Written by Jenn D

June 13th, 2012 at 11:47 am

Posted in Help

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Using TweetReach to determine the reach of a tweet

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You already know TweetReach reports are great for measuring the reach of hashtags and Twitter accounts, but how about an individual tweet? What if you want to analyze the reach of a tweet (and any retweets of or replies to that tweet)? Our reports can do that, too! In fact, that’s where our name comes from and one of the original problems we set out to solve more than three years ago. Tweet. Reach. TweetReach.

There are a few options for measuring the reach of a tweet. You can paste the entire text of the tweet into the search box. Since Twitter works best with shorter search queries that’s ideal if you have a shorter tweet. And if you have a longer tweet, you can select a few unique words or a phrase from the tweet to search for.

Let’s try it with this tweet from @Disney.

Since this is a pretty short tweet, we can search for the full tweet text (minus the URL to keep it simple): disney #DisneyFact: An estimated one million bubbles were drawn in the making of The Little Mermaid. We also included the original Twitter handle, minus the @ sign, to be sure we’re catching all attributed retweets of the original tweet. Here’s the TweetReach report for this query:

This report includes 108 total tweets, which includes the original tweet. So that’s 107 retweets. However, you can see that the original tweet only has 73 actual retweets, according to the Most Retweeted Tweets section. What’s going on?

This is where it gets a little messy. Some people will retweet a tweet with Twitter’s official RT button (we call this a new-style or automated retweet). Some will copy and paste the tweet and add “RT @username” to retweet (old-style or manual retweet). Some will modify the original tweet by adding their own commentary or abbreviating the text (modified retweet or MT). Some will simply quote the tweet without adding any RT language (quoted RT). Twitter typically only associates that first type (new-style RTs) with an original tweet to count them as retweets.

But in a TweetReach report, if a tweet starts with “RT @username”, regardless of how that retweet was generated (new-style or old-style), it will count as an official retweet. But if there’s anything in front of that retweet, such as commentary or other characters, then it will not count as a retweet, but it will show up in a report for that tweet. So that’s why the above report only shows 73 actual retweets of the original tweet, but there are 108 total tweets in the report. One of those tweets is the original tweet, 73 are official retweets, and the 34 remaining tweets are modified or quoted retweets. So the full reach of this @Disney Little Mermaid tweet and all its various retweets is 1,322,791.

A few more examples:

Search for: SFGiants amazing pic bradmangin melky cabrera 7th inning

Search for: wired “Hot New Characters Will Invigorate Game of Thrones”

Search for: tweetreachapp measure share of voice on twitter four steps

Tips for measuring the reach of a tweet:

  • Keep search queries short
  • Include handles without the @ sign
  • Put exact phrases in quotation marks
  • Select unique words for your query
  • Leave out URLs to keep it simple

And that’s how you can use a TweetReach report to analyze the reach of a tweet. Try it for yourself! And if you’re wondering what else you can search for, check our helpdesk or ask us.

PS – Have you ever tried our TweetReach Labs Retweet Rings tool? It’s a fun, animated visualizer to see how retweets spread.

Written by Jenn D

June 5th, 2012 at 12:31 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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The 5 easy steps to measure your social media campaigns

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This post by Union Metrics Co-Founder Jenn Deering Davis originally appeared on the KISSmetrics Blog on April 24, 2012

If you’re using social media, you should be measuring it. But don’t measure just for the sake of having metrics. Instead, measure your social activities so that you can learn what’s successful, what isn’t, and how you can improve.

In this post we will help you get started with social media measurement for your organization by addressing these questions:

  • How do you know if your social media activities are effective?
  • How do you decide what metrics you should be monitoring?
  • How do you calculate those metrics?
  • How do you interpret the numbers once you have them?

The Two Types of Social Media Measurement

The two types of social media measurement are:

  1. Ongoing Analytics – Ongoing monitoring that tracks activity over time
  2. Campaign-Focused Metrics – Campaign or event analytics with a clear beginning and end

Ongoing analytics are necessary for keeping up with the overall pulse of general conversation about your brand and company. Once your brand tracking is set up, you can just let it run and check in regularly to see how everything is going.

Campaign-focused metrics, on the other hand, help you understand the impact of targeted marketing initiatives and will vary from campaign to campaign, depending on your goals for each. An effective social media measurement program will likely include both ongoing and campaign-specific measurement.

Let’s Start With An Example

Let’s say you work at a large consumer products company and are about to launch a new diaper brand. To accompany the big advertising and marketing push, you want to sponsor a one-hour Twitter party where parents and caregivers can discuss raising children, focused on issues around diapering and potty training.

You’ve picked out a unique hashtag, contracted with an influential Twitterer who will pose questions and lead the conversation. You’re ready to go. But now you need to make sure you’re measuring this conversation so you can learn – and later tell your boss – how effective the chat was.

Step 1: Determine Your Social Goals

Before you jump into measuring every single tweet, photo and Facebook comment posted about your brand, first think about your goals with social media. What are you trying to accomplish or gain through these social channels? And which channels are most relevant to those goals?

The first step in your measurement plan should be to generate a list of what you’re trying to achieve from your social media efforts. Social media can serve a variety of purposes, from broadcasting news and information, to answering customer questions and engaging with a community. What is your company trying to accomplish?

You’ve probably already started interacting on social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, YouTube, and Instagram, depending on the type of information and the format of the content you’re sharing. You’ve probably also considered the audience you want to reach and the tools they’re using. So the next step is to think about what you want your audience to do with your content on these channels. Are you trying to get them to read, share, reply, click, purchase, engage? List out all your business goals for social media.

For our Twitter chat example, our goals are probably two-fold:

  1. First, we want to spread awareness of the new product to potential customers
  2. Second, we want to get to know the parenting community on Twitter, particularly the influencers in that community

Step 2: Create Metrics To Measure These Goals

The next step is to match your goals to actual metrics and behaviors you can measure. For example, if you’re trying to measure engagement, then what is the practical form of engagement you want to track? Is it retweets or reposts? Replies or comments? Clicks? Here are a few suggestions of behaviors to measure, based on a few common social media goals…

  • If you want to measure awareness, then use metrics like volume, reach, exposure, and amplification. How far is your message spreading?
  • If you want to measure engagement, then look for metrics around retweets, comments, replies, and participants. How many people are participating, how often are they participating, and in what forms are they participating?
  • If your goal is to drive traffic to your website, then track URL shares, clicks and conversions. Are people moving through social media to your external site and what do they do once they’re on your site?
  • If your goal is to find advocates and fans, then track contributors and influence. Who is participating and what kind of impact do they have?
  • If your goal is to increase your brand’s share of voice, then track your volume relative to your closest competitors. How much of the overall conversation around your industry or product category is about your brand?

For our hypothetical Twitter chat, our first goal is awareness, so we want to measure:

  1. The tweet volume and reach of our Twitter chat
  2. How many unique people tweeted with our hashtag

We’re also interesting in getting to know this community, so we want to know more about the participants, including:

  1. Any influence metrics we can find (like follower counts and Klout scores)
  2. Relevant demographic information about them (gender, location, etc…)

Step 3: Measure

After you’ve listed the metrics you want to focus on, now you need to find tools that actually capture these metrics, and then start measuring. In some cases, social media channels themselves provide some form of analytics, in some cases you will need to use third party tools, and in some cases you can build your own using APIs.

If you’re not sure which tools to use for which channels, ask around or do a quick Google search and you’ll find tons of options. SocDir is a useful and comprehensive source with a list of more than 300 social media metrics tools.

Many social analytics tools work in real-time, so if you can plan ahead and set up tracking before your campaign begins (and well before your report is due), it will be much easier to access the data you need later.

On Twitter, for example, accessing tweets that are more than a few days old is very expensive, difficult, and far less reliable than collecting and archiving them in real time. When possible, set up your measurement tools before your campaign begins.

The measurement part of this may take some time, so let the tools do their work. Make sure they’re tracking the social posts you’re interested in, do what you can to filter out spam, and then come back in a few days for steps 4 and 5.

Step 4: Monitor And Report

The fourth step is to report your results. Use your initial findings to set a baseline or benchmark for future measurement, and share these early figures with your important stakeholders. Two important questions to nail down are:

  • How do your numbers compare to what you expected?
  • How do they compare to your competitors’ or related products and campaigns?

One of the great parts of social media analytics is that you can easily run reports about your competitors to see how they’re doing.

This is a also a good time to consider your schedule for regular reporting. Depending on your (and your organization’s) schedule, monthly or quarterly reporting may work best, but weekly reporting may work well for others. No matter the schedule, make sure you’re checking in regularly on your metrics. Don’t let your effort up to this point go to waste! And let your metrics accumulate over time; you’ll see how valuable this data will become after a few months have passed and you have older data to compare to your new data.

In your reports, be sure you highlight the important numbers:

  • Include benchmarks or other contextual information so that your stakeholders can quickly understand what all the figures mean
  • Consider including visualizations of your data; graphs can help communicate your results quickly and clearly to your audience
  • Keep your graphs simple and clean

If you’re interested in reading more about data visualization, I highly recommend the work of Stephen Few; he has some excellent tips and examples.

Going back to our Twitter chat example, we’ll want to prepare a brief report to share internally. We don’t have baseline metrics yet to compare these to, but we probably started with a general idea of what we wanted to achieve with the chat.

As you recall, our goals were increasing awareness of the new product and getting to know community influencers for future interactions. Let’s say our chat generated 750 tweets from 200 unique contributors and a reach of 500,000. Several participants had Klout scores over 60 and tweeted multiple times.

So, even though this was our first chat, these are very respectable initial numbers. Half a million Twitter accounts were exposed to tweets with our hashtag, and we now have a list of 200 people who were talking about diapers, some of them very influential. We can build on this foundation in future initiatives, nurture relationships with these participants and continue to increase awareness of our new product.

Step 5: Adjust And Repeat

The final step is to carefully review your measurement program. How are these metrics doing? Are you missing anything? Was anything superfluous or unnecessary? Figure out what you can improve, make changes, and then measure some more. Check back in with the goals you set initially and make sure your new metrics actually help you address those goals.

In the case of our Twitter chat, we now realize that we also want to measure engagement around our chat hashtag. We’ve decided it’s important to know how many of our host’s tweets were retweeted and replied to, so we can understand what participants found most interesting. We can add this in and include it in our reporting next time.

If you’re participating in social media, you really need to understand how you’re doing. Is your content having the impact you want? Are you meeting your company’s goals with social media? This is why monitoring and measuring your social media activities is so crucial – you need reliable and consistent analytics that help you track your success on channels like Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

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Interested in learning more about TweetReach? Take a look at our website or contact our sales team for more.

Written by Dean Cruse

May 3rd, 2012 at 11:00 am

Posted in Guides,Help

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5 essential & easy social media metrics you should be measuring right now

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This post by Union Metrics Co-Founder Jenn Deering Davis originally appeared on the KISSmetrics Blog on April 2, 2012.

So your company is now officially participating in social media. You’ve set up a Twitter account, a Facebook page, even a few Pinterest boards. You respond to customer questions, follow fans, post important news, and thank your advocates for their support.

Beyond that, what are you doing to track and monitor these social interactions? If you’re engaging in social media, then you should be measuring those activities. How else will you know how you’re doing? The good news is it’s easier than you think to measure your social media efforts.

Here are five simple, but oh-so-useful social media metrics you should be measuring right now.

1. Volume

The first – and easiest – social media metric to measure is volume. What is the size of the conversation about your brand or your campaign? Volume is a great initial indicator of interest. People tend to talk about things they either love or hate, but they rarely talk about things they simply don’t care about at all.

While volume can seem like a simple counting metric, there’s more to it than just counting tweets and wall posts. It’s important to measure the number of messages about your brand, as well as the number of people talking about your brand, and track how both of those numbers change over time. For example, Facebook Insights has a useful metric (cleverly called “people talking about this”) that measures how many unique people have posted something to their walls about your brand page.

Learn when volume is higher – are there days or times when more people seem to be talking about your brand? You can use this information to focus more of your own posts during these times to get more engagement, which we’ll talk about in a minute.

2. Reach

Reach measures the spread of a social media conversation. On its own, reach can help you understand the context for your content. How far is your content disseminating and how big is the audience for your message? Reach is a measure of potential audience size.

And of course, a large audience is good, but reach alone does not tell you everything. Reach becomes very powerful when compared to other engagement metrics. Use reach as the denominator in your social media measurement equations.

Pick important action or engagement numbers like clicks, retweets, or replies (more on this in a second) and divide them by reach to calculate an engagement percentage. Of the possible audience for your campaign, how many people participated? Reach helps contextualize other engagement metrics.

3. Engagement

Speaking of engagement metrics, this is one of the most important areas to measure in social media. How are people participating in the conversation about your brand? What are they doing to spread your content and engage with the topic?

In most social media settings, content can be both shared and replied to. Twitter retweets (RTs) and Facebook shares and posts are helpful to know who is spreading your content, while comments, replies and likes are helpful to see who is replying to your content. Think carefully about your goals with social media. Are you focused more on generating interaction (replies, comments) or on spreading a message (retweets and posts)? Be sure you’re using metrics that reflect what’s important to your brand right now.

And are there types of content that generate engagement? Start paying attention to what messages generate the most replies and RTs. It might surprise you what people interact with; it’s not always what you expect.

4. Influence

Who is talking about your brand and what kind of impact do they have? Influence is probably the most controversial social media metric; there are myriad tools that measure social influence, and they all do it in different ways. But one thing they all agree on is that audience size does not necessarily relate to influence. Just because someone has a lot of friends or followers, that does not mean they can encourage those followers to actually do anything.

Based on past actions, we can make assumptions about how influential someone might be in the future. This type of potential influence is useful to decide who to reach out to when you’re preparing for a campaign. Tools like Klout and PeerIndex assign people an influence score. Tools like these measure online social capital and the (potential) ability to influence others.

Kinetic influence, on the other hand, will help you understand who is participating in and driving conversation about your brand and your campaigns, and who gets others to participate in these specific conversations. You can find your brand advocates by focusing on people whose messages are amplified by others, and not just who has the most followers.

5. Share of Voice

Finally, to really understand how well you’re doing on social media, you should consider a share of voice metric. How does the conversation about your brand compare to conversations about your competitors? Determine what percentage of the overall conversation about your industry is focused on your brand compared to your main competitors. And learn from your competitors’ successes; since so many of these social media conversations are public, you can measure your competitors’ impact just as easily as you can measure your own.

Consistency and preparation are essential to effective social media measurement. Pick your favorite metrics and start tracking them now. Use the same formulas and tools to calculate these numbers every week or month. Track your numbers over time and pay attention to how they change. If you see anything that looks higher or lower than what you typically expect, investigate it. By measuring – and paying attention to – these five social media metrics, you’ll be able to better understand the impact and effectiveness of your social media activity.

Interested in learning more about TweetReach? Take a look at our website or contact our sales team for more.

Written by Dean Cruse

April 26th, 2012 at 11:05 am

Confused about Twitter search? You’re not alone.

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There’s one question our support team gets asked more often than anything else – how far back can TweetReach reports go? And it’s no wonder we get this question all the time; it can be pretty damn confusing. How long are tweets available? Why aren’t they available for a week or more? Why does this seem to change from one day to the next?

First, a bit about how TweetReach reports work. Our snapshot reports – both the 50-tweet free report and the full $20 report – are generated from Twitter’s Search API. You type in a search query, which can consist of one or more hashtags, keywords, usernames, URLs, and so on, and then we run that search through Twitter’s Search API to find all matching tweets. So our snapshot reports are dependent upon the tweets accessible through Twitter’s Search API.

It probably goes without saying that Twitter handles a lot of data. A lot. Twitter currently processes around 200 million new tweets a day, resulting in more than 350 billion tweet deliveries every single day. By our (very rough) estimation, there have been something like 1.75 trillion unique tweets posted in the past 2.5 years. Without getting too technical, let’s just say that it’s pretty hard to keep a service of this magnitude running. Because of this scale, Twitter can’t possibly keep trillions of historical tweets accessible to anyone at any time. Which is why when you go to Twitter Search or run a TweetReach report, you’re probably only going to find a few days worth of tweets. It’s just too hard to keep any more reliably and consistently available.

One of the things we love about Twitter – or at least that we have long since learned to live with – is that it can be a bit unpredictable. It’s a huge application with hundreds of millions of accounts; there will be occasional fail whales and things are probably going to change from one day to the next. One thing we know for sure is that it will continue to get harder and harder for Twitter to make older tweets available through search. The good news is that we’ve been doing this for a long time and have a number of ways to deal with these inevitable changes.

This brings us back to the most frequently asked of our FAQs – how far back can a TweetReach report go? The simplest answer is that our one-time snapshot reports – both the free and the full $20 versions – go back as far as Twitter’s Search API does. And right now, the Twitter Search API goes back a few days (the exact number varies, so check here for current conditions). The more in-depth answer is that, if we know about your event, campaign, or promotion in advance, we can use our TweetReach Pro service to track and save your tweets for weeks, months or even years. TweetReach Pro comes with Trackers, which connect to Twitter’s real-time Streaming API instead of their historical Search API. This means we can actually save your tweets on our own servers the moment they’re posted to Twitter, and then you can access them later because we’re not dependent on Twitter keeping those tweets available.

So, if you’re confused about your search results or curious about what tweets you can retroactively access, let us help you. Seriously, we’re here if you have any questions – just ask!

Photo credit: Search. by Jeffrey Beall

Written by Jenn D

July 26th, 2011 at 8:06 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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