Home Products Plans & Pricing Help Blog About

TweetReach Blog

Thoughts on social media analytics from the makers of TweetReach

Archive for the ‘Help’ Category

TweetReach Tip: Searching for more than one term in a snapshot report

without comments

If you want to run a TweetReach snapshot report for more than one term, be sure to remember the magic of the “OR” operator. You can search for any two or three queries by combining them together with OR. Example:

term1 OR term2 – search for tweets containing either term1 or term2 (e.g. analytics OR metrics)

A few things to keep in mind to get the best results possible:

  •  Keep queries around 50-60 characters, 100 max.
  • If searching for two word phrases, use quote marks or you might not get the results you’re looking for. Example: “pumpkin ale” OR #manafromthegourd

Written by Sarah

October 24th, 2013 at 1:20 pm

TweetReach Tip: Measuring the results of a Twitter contest

without comments

If you’re running a contest and using TweetReach to track it, you’ll want to take a look at this post so you don’t miss any of the tweets you want to capture. For best results, we have a few suggestions. Keep your original tweet short (120 characters or less) and unique, and use hashtags and a unique URL to distinguish yourself from other contests (a generic term like “RT for a chance to win an iPad” gets tweeted 40 times a minute).

Now let’s look at specifics, depending on whether you’re measuring results after the fact with a snapshot report or setting up a Tracker to monitor tweets in real-time through your TweetReach Pro subscription.

TweetReach Snapshot Report

There are a few ways to search for contest tweets in a snapshot report. Remember that a snapshot report will look back at up to 1500 recently posted tweets from the past few days, so you can run a snapshot after a contest ends if only ran for a few days and had fewer then 1500 tweets.

1. Don’t search for the entire text of a tweet; search for the first 50-60 characters of your tweet, wrapped in quotation marks. Remember that retweets add characters to the front of your tweet. “jimmyjohn: you so silly Sandwich Place! RT @sandwichartiste: RT if you love meatball subs! #subs4life” is longer than “@sandwichartiste: RT if you love meatball subs! #subs4life”. Make sure that a user adding a note before the text of their retweet won’t push any terms you are searching for beyond the 140 character limit.

2. Use an original hashtag or URL in your contest tweet, and search for all retweets that contain “RT” and your hashtag or URL. (Put exactly RT #subs4life or RT http://bit.ly/12aoGYA in the TweetReach search bar for your snapshot report.) 

TweetReach Pro Tracker

If you expect significant participation or want to run your contest for more than one week, set up a Tracker in advance. Trackers can monitor unlimited tweets for unlimited time; you just need to set them up before your tweets start going out. The same rules apply to a Tracker, but you can (and should) set up a Tracker to search for your contest tweet in both ways.

Search for both the first 50 characters of the tweet, but also any identifying URLs or hashtags you’re using. A Tracker can include up to 15 different queries, so you can enter in several different combinations to make sure you’re getting exactly the tweets you’re looking for.


TR Tip Contest Tracker Queries

 

Written by Sarah

October 16th, 2013 at 10:55 am

TweetReach Tip: How to isolate specific dates in a Tracker

without comments

To isolate specific dates in your TweetReach Tracker, simply click on the calendar icon in the upper right hand corner of your screen, and specify the date range that you want.

Tracker Date Range

 

That’s it!

Still got a question? Let us know! Or find us on Twitter

Written by Sarah

October 8th, 2013 at 12:29 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

Tagged with , , , ,

TweetReach Tip: How to isolate specific dates in a snapshot report

without comments

If you want tweets from a specific date range in your TweetReach snapshot report, you need to use the since and until operators:

since:YYYY-MM-DD - search only for tweets after a specific date in UTC (e.g. since:2010-03-30)
until:YYYY-MM-DD - search only for tweets before a specific date in UTC (e.g. until:2010-03-30)

Want to see it in action? Go here to see an example. And learn more about everything you can search for, including other operators, here.

Still got a question? Let us know! Or find us on Twitter

Written by Sarah

October 1st, 2013 at 12:53 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

Tagged with , ,

TweetReach Tip: Searching for tweets from a specific account

without comments

If you set up a TweetReach snapshot report or Tracker to search for @username, that will only return mentions and retweets of that Twitter account. So, that might be what you’re looking for. But if you’d like to see tweets to and from that account, add in the from:username query, like this:

@username OR from:username

This will make sure we pull all mentions, retweets, and replies to your Twitter handle, as well as tweets from your account. That’s the best way to see the full set of interactions with a particular account. Want to see it in action? Here’s an example.

Still got a question? Let us know! Or find us on Twitter

Written by Sarah

September 26th, 2013 at 1:18 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

Tagged with , , , ,

How to use advanced Twitter search queries: Part 2

without comments

We wager our solution is more effective than sending out these guys. (Image credit: NYPL Digital)

Since our first post on How to use advanced Twitter search queries is one of our most popular posts, we thought we’d break down some more advanced queries we didn’t cover in that writeup. Here are a few more of our favorite advanced Twitter search queries. And let us know if you have a question you don’t see answered here!

Specific phrase or term

Much like on Google, when you want to return results on an exact phrase- especially something that has a common word or popular slang expression in it that might return a lot of noise otherwise- be sure to put it in quotes.

“term1 term2” – search for tweets containing the phrase “term1 term2” (e.g. “aging hippies”)

This way you’ll only get back tweets talking specifically about aging hippies, with those words in that exact order. Without the quotes, you might get results about hippies aging wine or something else irrelevant to what you’re actually looking for.

Tweets containing links

This search filter comes in handy if you’re looking for people who are sharing articles they’ve found or are talking about a specific URL – say an article in the news, or a blog post you’ve recently put out that’s getting a lot of chatter. It’s also a great way to track link shares for a Twitter contest.

filter:links – search only for tweets containing links (e.g. CNN filter:links)

You can add this filter to any search terms to return only tweets that include those terms and a URL.

Tweets in a particular language

Let’s say you’ve run a free TweetReach report with your test query to see what kind of results you’re getting (something we absolutely recommend doing so you can tweak what you need to) and it’s returned a lot of tweets that aren’t in a language that you speak. Or let’s say you want information on a specific event or campaign, like Dia de los Muertos from those who speak Spanish. Use:

lang:NN – to search for only tweets in a particular language (e.g. Nutella lang:en for only English tweets about Nutella)

or

“dia de los muertes” lang:es – Find tweets in spanish about “dia de los muertes”

When added to a search query, the language filter will narrow your results to tweets in that language. Not all languages are supported on Twitter, so check this list to see which are and to get more information about languages on Twitter in general.

And more…

These are just a few we didn’t go over in the first post, so here’s the full list of advanced Twitter search operators if you’re interested in more. And we’ll repeat our advice from last time– Twitter handles fairly simple queries really well, but tends to break with longer and more complex queries. We recommend that you only add in a few advanced operators per query and try to limit the total number of keywords and characters in a search query. Keep it under 5-8 words and 60 characters and you should be fine.

Again, if you ever have any questions about search queries and how to get exactly the data you need from Twitter, just ask us! We’re big Twitter search nerds and can help you figure out even the trickiest search queries.

Written by Sarah

July 30th, 2013 at 8:54 am

TweetReach Tip: Common Tracker mistakes

with one comment

Much like the double-tap method is essential for zombie eradication, double- and triple-checking your Tracker queries is essential to success with your TweetReach Pro Trackers. Be sure you aren’t making any of the following common mistakes with your Tracker setup, and you’ll get the best results possible with your Tracker.

Mistake #1: Not making the tweets you send from your own Twitter account easily trackable.

  • Put your hashtag toward the beginning of your campaign tweets. If you put it toward the end, it could get cut off in subsequent retweets. Also be sure you keep your campaign tweets to a shorter, shareable length; the “perfect tweet length appears to be around 100 characters”, according to a study by TrackSocial.
  • If you begin a tweet with someone’s Twitter handle – for example, @tweetreachapp – only that account and anyone who follows both of you will see it. Be sure to add a period or other text to the beginning of the tweet if you want to gain the largest impression possible: “.@tweetreachapp is a great tool”. You can read more about @replies and impressions on our helpdeskThe bottom line: if you want to track a tweet and get the most data about it possible, don’t start it with a Twitter handle.

Mistake #2: Small errors in your Tracker queries can keep you from getting the data you need.

  • Make sure you’ve set up the right search terms in your Tracker. For example, banana won’t capture tweets including the word bananas. And #banana will only find uses of the hashtag, but not general uses of the word banana. Add multiple queries if you need to (banana, bananas, #banana AND #bananas).
  • Make sure you spell your search terms correctly. It seems basic, but checking on this will save you from missing data. Also keep be sure to add queries to include accented characters and punctuation, as well as alternative spellings. For example: “shop ‘til you drop” and “shop til you drop”, or  dakar perú and dakar peru. 
  • Make sure you’re using the right form of your hashtag, or search for multiple hashtags if appropriate. Likewise, make sure the tweets you’re sending out have the correct hashtag, and do what you can to communicate the official version to participants. Sometimes, you may need to adapt and track audience-generated hashtags; the official form doesn’t always get the use you’re expecting.

Want more tips on improving your search queries? You can read all about it here. And if you have any questions about your Trackers, just ask!

Written by Sarah

January 30th, 2013 at 7:30 am

Posted in Help

Tagged with , , , ,

TweetReach 2012 holiday support hours

without comments

The TweetReach support team will be around to answer all of your questions throughout the final weeks of 2012. However, please allow them a little extra time to return your calls and emails on the following dates, as they might be stuffing themselves with holiday treats and spending time with their families.

  • Saturday, December 22 – Tuesday, December 25
  • Sunday, December 30 – Tuesday, January 1

On these days, we will return all non-urgent requests within 24 hours and urgent requests as soon as possible. As always, you can get in touch with us in many ways. Email is the fastest way to get through to us during the holidays (aren’t smart phones great?).

Happy holidays from Union Metrics!

Written by Sarah

December 19th, 2012 at 10:40 am

Posted in Help

Tagged with , , , ,

Which TweetReach product should I use?

without comments

We know you’ve got different needs and different budgets, even on different days. That’s why we offer a range of TweetReach products to help you get the best return on your Twitter investment– and we’re here to help you figure out which tool to use.

We have three main products at TweetReach: our snapshot reports, Pro Trackers, and historical analytics.

A Tracker is best when:

Your topic is going to pull in a lot of tweets.
If you’re running a conference or other major event or tracking any large or popular topic where you’re anticipating a large volume of tweets to be generated, set up a Tracker beforehand to be sure you don’t miss any tweets. Snapshot reports are limited to 1500 tweets, but Trackers don’t have those limits and will capture all the tweets about your topic or event.

The best part? All tweets collected by a Tracker are archived for as long as you have a TweetReach Pro subscription, so you can drill into your data to find out how customers are interacting with your brand and/or campaign over the entire time you’ve been tracking. This is a great way to discover brand advocates, industry influencers, and see trends develop over time.

You want to track what everyone is saying during your campaign or event.
This is what Trackers were made for; with Trackers you can monitor and analyze unlimited tweets in real time, as the tweets are posted to Twitter. Each Tracker allows you to monitor up to 15 queries about your topic, which can include hashtags, a key industry phrase, and more. This will allow you to keep track of who is saying what about your event – enabling you to handle any issues as they emerge – and gives you a wealth of data to study later. You’ll be able to recognize key contributors and influencers, and plan better for your next big event. With a Tracker set up you won’t have to worry about pulling reports at different intervals to get the information you need. It will be automatically collected for you, just waiting to be analyzed.

Keep in mind that Trackers are only available through a TweetReach Pro subscription.

Historical analytics are best when:

You want to compare a current campaign to one you ran last year, or a few years ago.
With the addition of our premium historical analytics, you can now compare current campaigns to those of the past (your own or your competitors’). For the first time we have the ability to reach all the way back to tweets posted at the very beginning of Twitter in March of 2006.

Twitter isn’t just about real-time anymore: now the entirety of Twitter history is available to be analyzed and studied.

You want to research past tweets.
Research the after effects of Twitter emergencies, PR disasters, recurring events (conferences, holidays, etc), past feelings around a certain event or topic compared to now– and more. You can research how a past event or campaigned performed even if you didn’t have real-time tracking setup then. You can compare year-over-year campaign performance before you plan your next big campaign. Having that kind of information to back up the ideas you pitch to your company or client is huge, and TweetReach historical analytics makes it possible.

We’ve recently launched our historical analytics product, and we’re incredibly excited about its implications.

Want to travel back in Twitter time with historical analytics? Read more details and get a quote.

A snapshot report is best when:

You need something fast, and free.
We understand that not every marketing team has a large budget for analytics, and not every business has a marketing team in the first place. For this reason, we offer a free snapshot report that gives you an idea of the reach of your hashtag, account, tweet or any other keyword-based topic.

Hint: you can archive (with a free TweetReach account), or print and save these reports to keep a simple record of how your company or campaign is doing on Twitter. And it costs you nothing.


You want a general idea of how tweets are spreading right now.
Search for any current hashtag, username, key phrase from a tweet, or any keyword, and our snapshot report will measure the extent of your reach, exposure, the most popular tweets, and the biggest contributors to your topic. We have two versions of our snapshot report: the quick snapshot report is free, and will include up to 50 tweets. Want more? A full snapshot report is available to anyone- no subscription or account required- and includes up to 1500 tweets for just $20. With a TweetReach Pro subscription you’ll have access to bundles of free and full snapshot reports.

Keep in mind these only provide a snapshot of recent tweets. If you want to look at what was happening yesterday or a year ago, you need our premium Historical Analytics, which are available separately.

Got any questions we missed?

Check out our help forums or drop us a line. We’re here to help!

Written by Sarah

December 12th, 2012 at 12:49 pm

TweetReach Tip: Improve your snapshot report search query

with one comment

Our customers often ask the question, “What exactly can I search for on TweetReach?” We want to make sure you get the most out of your snapshot reports, so here’s everything you need to know about queries.

For all snapshot report searches, keep in mind that shorter queries work better: under 70 characters, or 6-8 words. Use the most specific terms possible to find what you’re looking for and consider if you need a particular phrase; if so put it in quotes (“peanut butter banana”) so it will appear exactly in that order. Be sure to account for misspellings or nicknames that might apply to the phrase, campaign or brand name that you’re searching for.

Our snapshot reports and Trackers work a little differently. Snapshot reports collect data from Twitter’s search API, which includes up to 1,500 tweets from the past week, and Trackers rely on the real-time, full-coverage Twitter stream from Gnip. In both, you can search for basically anything that appears in a tweet, including Twitter names, terms or phrases, hashtags, etc… You can also narrow the search for any of those things by adding a time frame, filtering for links or a particular language, and more.

Search for tweets related to an account:

  • username – search for tweets to, from and about a specific Twitter user (e.g. tweetreachapp)
  • @username – search for tweets mentioning or RTing a specific Twitter user (e.g. @tweetreachapp)
  • from:username – search only for tweets from a specific Twitter user (e.g. from:tweetreachapp)
  • to:username – search only for tweets directed to a specific Twitter user (e.g. to:tweetreachapp)

Search for tweets containing a particular term or phrase, including a #hashtag:

  • term1 term2 – search for tweets containing both term1 and term2 in any order (e.g. twitter metrics)
  • term1 OR term2 – search for tweets containing either term1 or term2 (e.g. analytics OR metrics)
  • “term1 term2” – search for tweets containing the phrase “term1 term2” (e.g. “twitter metrics”)
  • term1 -term2 – search for tweets containing term1 but not including term2 (e.g. twitter -facebook)

Put a more specific filter on your search for an account, term or phrase:

  • since:YYYY-MM-DD – search only for tweets after a specific date in UTC (e.g. since:2012-12-12)
  • until:YYYY-MM-DD – search only for tweets before a specific date in UTC (e.g. until:2012-12-12)
  • filter:links – search only for tweets containing links
  • lang:NN – to search for only tweets in a particular language (e.g. lang:en for only English tweets, more info about languages here)

For instance, let’s say you want to search for tweets that contain the words “banana metrics”, and you only want the ones with those exact words in that exact order, starting from a certain date. In that case you’d enter “banana metrics”- in the quotes to get the exact phrase- into the search bar, adding since:2012-12-12 to the query. So it would look like this:

“banana metrics” since:2012-12-12

And your report would return to you all the tweets containing the term “banana metrics” since the 12th of December, 2012. (If you want to get data about “banana metrics” from last week, you’ll have to get a quote on our Historical Analytics, available separately from reports or the Trackers that come with a TweetReach Pro subscription.)

Still have questions? We have answers!

Get more details on what you can search for in a TweetReach report in our help forums; there’s also a breakdown of what you can do with a snapshot report by question. We’ve also written on the blog about using snapshot reports to measure the reach of a Twitter account (here’s the help forum post on that as well) and the reach of a particular tweet, two options to search for.

If you still have questions don’t be afraid to drop us a line. We’re here to help!

Written by Sarah

December 10th, 2012 at 12:42 pm

Posted in Help

Tagged with , , ,