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TweetReach: Where our Twitter data comes from

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We use Gnip so we don’t have to send poor Merle down into the Twitter data mines.

We’ve written before about the five questions you should be asking your social analytics provider, and we wanted to make it clear what you’re getting when you choose TweetReach Pro. If you still have questions after you read this, feel free to share them in the comments below, or drop us a line. We’ll be happy to help answer them!

Does Union Metrics have access to the Twitter firehose for TweetReach?

This is a question we get fairly often, and although we address it in our help docs, we also wanted to address it here as it’s a little more complicated than it might seem. The short answer is yes. As for the long answer…

Twitter has two licensed data resellers - Gnip and Datasift - who can provide access to the full Twitter firehose to third parties. The full Twitter firehose includes full-coverage, real-time streaming access to all of the data from Twitter. In most cases, direct access to the full firehose is unnecessary, not to mention very expensive to consume and store. After all, as of last fall, Twitter has 215 million monthly active users, 100 million daily active users, and sees 500 million tweets per day.

So companies like us here at Union Metrics work with one of these data resellers, who have built powerful filtering tools on top of the Twitter firehose to provide high-quality access to the data we need. This makes it more efficient in both time and money for us provide the detailed, comprehensive Twitter analytics our customers want. We’ve elected to work with Gnip, and in fact are part of their Plugged In to Gnip partner program, which means they recognize that we can deliver you the highest quality Twitter data available through licensed access to the full Twitter firehose. This means you don’t have to worry about missing any data.

Our TweetReach Pro Trackers are built on Gnip’s real-time PowerTrack stream, meaning we have full access to all tweets as they are posted – with no rate limits! – for any keyword, hashtag or account you want to analyze. Similarly, TweetReach premium historical analytics are built on Gnip’s Historical PowerTrack product, and provide complete access to the Twitter archive, dating back to March of 2006. Both include full tweet coverage.

To sum up: TweetReach Twitter analytics are built from licensed access to the full Twitter firehose through Gnip.

What about Union Metrics’ other products?

Union Metrics is a certified Plugged In To Gnip partner, which means we have commercially licensed, full-coverage access to both Twitter and Tumblr data. That’s reliable, reputable data you can count on, both now and in the future. Here’s the breakdown of the data source for each of our products:

  • Our TweetReach Pro Trackers have Gnip PowerTrack access – that’s full coverage of all public tweets in real time for any search terms you enter. That means no missed tweets and no sampling.
  • Our TweetReach snapshot reports use the Twitter Search API, so they’re great for quick estimates of recent activity, but are limited to about 1500 tweets from the past week.
  • Our TweetReach premium historical analytics use Gnip’s Historical PowerTrack. That gives us full access to any public tweet in Twitter’s history, dating back to the very first tweet posted in March 2006.
  • Finally, with Union Metrics for Tumblr, we consume the full Tumblr firehose. That means we process 100% of all public posts, notes and other Tumblr activities.

If you have any other questions about our data access, please just ask!

Written by Sarah

January 29th, 2014 at 1:47 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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TweetReach Tip: Less is more with snapshot reports

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Keep it simple with TweetReach snapshot reports! Here are a few things to keep in mind when you’re running a snapshot report:

1. Snapshots will analyze tweets up to one week old. Snapshots pull tweets from up to 7 days ago, so be sure you run them as soon as you can after your event. Older tweets are only available through our premium historical analytics.

2. Full snapshots will include up to 1,500 tweets. Due to restrictions from Twitter’s Search API (more on that below), a full snapshot report is limited to about 1500 tweets from the past week. If your topic or hashtag had more tweets than that, we’ll go back until we hit that limit, but won’t be able to pull them all into a snapshot report. For higher-volume topics, try our historical analytics or ongoing Pro Trackers.

3. A snapshot report is just that – a snapshot. We use the Twitter Search API for our snapshot report data, and it operates more on relevancy than on completeness. This means it will pull everything that Twitter considers most relevant to your search query from the past seven days, so some tweets or users might be missing from your results. For more complete results, try our Pro Tracker, which has access to the full-fidelity, real-time Twitter stream.

4. Narrow your snapshot search dates with filters. If you want more specific results for a snapshot report, you can include date filters. The since: and until: operators allow you to select a specific date range within the past week for your search. For example, let’s say you want to see all #TBT tweets for December 12, 2013 through December 17, 2013. Search for #TBT since:2013-12-12 until:2013-12-18 (use the YYYY-MM-DD format, which is tied to 00:00 for each date). Like this:

#TBT Snapshot

5. Tweets in our snapshot reports are displayed in the Universal Coordinated Time zone (UTC). This is to simplify and standardize our reporting across all time zones. If you need help converting UTC to your time zone, try this converter.

Written by Sarah

January 2nd, 2014 at 9:23 am

TweetReach Holiday Support Hours 2013

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The Union Metrics support team will be around to answer all of your questions throughout the final weeks of 2013. However, please allow us a little extra time to return your calls and emails on the following dates, as we might be stuffing ourselves with holiday treats and spending time with our families.

  • Tuesday, December 24 – Friday, December 27
  • Tuesday, December 31 – Thursday, January 2

On these days, we will return all non-urgent requests within 24 hours and urgent requests as soon as possible. As always, you can get in touch with us in many ways. Email is the fastest way to get through to us during the holidays.

Happy holidays from Union Metrics!

 

Written by Sarah

December 19th, 2013 at 9:00 am

Posted in Help

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TweetReach Tip: Tracking words with accent marks

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When you’re setting up a Tracker in your Pro account we want to make sure you get the best results possible. One thing that can be tricky is words with accent marks, such as crêpe, doppelgänger, or crème brûlée. Twitter treats accented letters as completely different letters from their unaccented counterparts. If you are searching for a hashtag or keyword that’s accented, it’s best to set up your Tracker terms to include both the accented and un-accented spelling (but only in Trackers; snapshot reports will return both results regardless of which you search and you can see an example of one at the end of this post), like this:

Crepe 1

For more specific results, there are two ways to filter by language in a Tracker to help capture more relevant tweets. For example, let’s say you’re tracking crêpe as the keyword for a contest for a French company, but you think some English speakers participating might leave off the accent marks. You can select the Universal language filters to only return results in French, like this:

Crepe 2

Or you can set it up to return accented results in French and non-accented results in English by putting a separate language filter at the end of each query line, like this:

Crepe 3

If you’re keeping it simple just to get an idea of the conversation around crêpes, a snapshot report would look like this.

Are you new to TweetReach or want to learn more about our products? 

First, run a free snapshot report about your Twitter account, hashtag, keywords or URL on tweetreach.com. If you have any questions about our metrics, read this.

Second, if you’d like to set up ongoing monitoring for any Twitter account or keyword-based topic, check ourTweetReach Pro. Starting at just $84 per month, it’s a great and affordable way to start tracking and analyzing your tweets in real time. Contact our sales team if you have any questions at all.

Written by Sarah

December 12th, 2013 at 12:30 pm

TweetReach Tip: Saving your snapshot reports

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You don’t have to go Pro to save your TweetReach snapshot reports. As long as you’ve registered for a free TweetReach account - and you’re logged in! – you can save every report you run for future access in your My Reports archive. That applies to both free, 50-tweet snapshots, as well as full, $20 snapshots.  Just be sure to log in to your account before you run your next snapshot report.

And whenever you purchase  a full snapshot report, you’ll still receive an email copy and a receipt. If you happen to purchase a report while you were logged out, just send us an email and we’ll be happy to move it into your account.

Are you new to TweetReach or want to learn more about our products? 

First, run a free snapshot report about your Twitter account, hashtag, keywords or URL on tweetreach.com. If you have any questions about our metrics, read this.

Second, if you’d like to set up ongoing monitoring for any Twitter account or keyword-based topic, check our TweetReach Pro. Starting at just $84 per month, it’s a great and affordable way to start tracking and analyzing your tweets in real time. Contact our sales team if you have any questions at all.

 

Written by Sarah

December 3rd, 2013 at 11:56 am

Union Metrics Thanksgiving support hours

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The Union Metrics support team will be around to answer all of your questions throughout the Thanksgiving holiday. However, please allow us a little extra time to return your calls and emails on Thursday, November 28 and Friday, November 29, as we’re likely to be stuffing our faces with turkey and cranberry sauce (or sleeping off our resulting food comas).

During this time, we will return all urgent requests as soon as possible and non-urgent requests within 24 hours. As always, you can get in touch with us in many ways, but email is the best way to reach us over the holiday (aren’t smartphones great?).

Happy Thanksgiving!

Written by Sarah

November 27th, 2013 at 11:00 am

Posted in Help

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TweetReach Tip: Snapshot report receipts

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If you buy one of our full snapshot reports (up to 1500 tweets, posted up to one week ago), then we’ll send you an email with your snapshot report, as well as a receipt for your purchase.

In that report email, you’ll have links to access your report and receipt online, download a PDF, export a CSV file and find our support contact information. Here’s an example of that email:

Screen Shot 2013-11-26 at 11.06.37 AM

So, when you order your report, don’t lose this email! It has your receipt and report info, in case you need it later. But if you do lose the email, call or email us and we’ll be happy to send you another copy!

 

Written by Sarah

November 26th, 2013 at 1:31 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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TweetReach Tip: Excluding tweets from your search

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You can exclude certain tweets from your results by using the minus (“-”) operator in your TweetReach search. You can exclude tweets that include certain keywords or tweets that mention a certain account. For example:

 Sandwiches -ham 

or

#swag -justinbieber

The second example is a good one to use if you find a spammer or someone whose tweets you really don’t want to include in your reports.

Note that there should not be a space between the minus and the word you’re excluding.  If you’d like to exclude a two word phrase, wrap them in quotation marks, like this:

#swag -”justin bieber”

Written by Sarah

November 21st, 2013 at 9:08 am

TweetReach Tip: Searching for a specific tweet

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Say you want to search for a specific tweet in a snapshot report, like this one from our Twitter timeline:

TR Tweet

Be sure to search for the text of the tweet, rather than the tweet’s unique URL. Try searching for the first part of the tweet text. Keep it short – under 60 characters – and wrap it in quotations marks in order to catch any and all retweets. Like this:

“Vanity metrics- like FB Likes- have their uses”

Written by Sarah

November 14th, 2013 at 2:29 pm

TweetReach Tip: Searching for URLs

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If you want to follow a piece of news through Twitter, try searching for the article’s URL instead of its title or a set of keywords. In TweetReach snapshot reports, we can search for a root URL, so even if a link is shrunk into a t.co, bit.ly or other shortener, we’ll pick it up.

Some more tips to get the results you’re looking for:

  • Exclude the http:// or www. They don’t impact your search and lengthen your search query. And depending on the URL shortener, might not even be included in the link.
  • Keep queries at about 60 characters or under. If you have a long URL, consider searching for the second half – the unique part – of the URL to save space.

Want to see an example? Say you want to follow this New York Times article Sushi’s New Vanguard and watch how it spreads through Twitter. In your TweetReach search, you can leave out the http:// and www. portions of the URL. Search just for this:

nytimes.com/2013/10/30/dining/sushis-new-vanguard.html

That will result in this snapshot report. Note how it includes tweets that use nyti.ms shortened URLs, among others.

Have any questions about your URL? Just ask us!

Written by Sarah

November 5th, 2013 at 10:50 am