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Marketing your conference across platforms: Snapchat and Pinterest

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While Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr are the main three platforms brands tend to work with, other brands are making strides in places like Snapchat and on Pinterest. If you have the resources to play around with these platforms in addition to the big three- or if you know that’s where you audience spends a large amount of their time- take the opportunity to see what you can do in these places to supplement and enhance everything you’re doing elsewhere. They’re particularly fun platforms to utilize in a cross-platform campaign.

Snapchat

We’ve covered the basics and specifics for brands on Snapchat, as well as showing which brands are using it well. Snapchat is a perfect way to keep in touch with event attendees in a lighthearted way throughout a conference; you can send snaps showing upcoming events, or recapping a session or a cocktail party. You can ask for snaps back in order to share free drink tickets or admission to a packed keynote; your creativity is the limit on Snapchat in terms of interaction with your followers. Like Instagram, it’s a great way to show off the atmosphere and get future attendees more interested in booking their trip for the next year.

It’s also a great way to foster conversations between attendees; intimidating names in a field can seem more approachable to build a connection with when they’re willing to send a silly snap.

Photo 6-25-14, 11 59 11 AM

 

A snap from Mashable attending a Google event in San Francisco. 

Just be sure you’re letting attendees know ahead of time across your other platforms that you’re on Snapchat, because most won’t think to look for you there. Having signage up around your conference will also let attendees know where to find you across platforms, and keep official hashtags in play, making post-event tracking easier for you!

Pinterest

Pinterest is a great way to help attendees get organized around a conference; build boards for them so they know what to pack, and what sites to see around town if they decide to come a few days early or stay a few days after. You could even encourage speakers to build their own boards around their areas of expertise, driving traffic back to their sites and letting attendees have a better idea of who they are and what their professional and personal focuses are.

SXSW Pinterest

 

An example of a Pinterest board from SXSW, showing off photos from Instagram and helping attendees figure out what to pack. 

The number and variety of boards you want to build up for your event is up to your creativity, time, and resources. Also keep in mind that Pinterest is great at driving sales, so pinning books your speakers have written after an event is a good idea as well as the same kind of snappy visual reminders you put on Instagram around deadlines for ticket prices.

The bottom line

The bottom line remains the same as in our previous post covering the big three social marketing platforms (aside from Facebook): Play to the strengths of every platform you have a presence on, but especially with these two, don’t be afraid to get creative and have fun.

If you have any questions or examples of great conference marketing we missed, please leave it in the comments!

Written by Sarah

July 15th, 2014 at 8:36 am

Marketing your conference across platforms: Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr

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We recently discussed 3 dos and don’ts for running a campaign across platforms, but what about marketing a conference or similar event across platforms? Successfully marketing an event requires tailoring your message for each platform, just as with any successful campaign. We’ll break down some of the specific uses for each platform here, playing to their individual strengths and making note of what to keep in mind based on how each works and interacts with the others.

Twitter

We’ve covered 16 ways to use Twitter to improve your next conference and 7 tips to maximize your conference attendance using Twitter, so what’s different when you’re adding other platforms to the mix?

When building your communication plan for your conference you want to keep in mind the strengths of each platform to plan which content you’re going to disseminate where; Twitter’s strength lies in it being the ultimate real-time tool. Use Twitter to broadcast quick updates and reminders throughout your event, such as:

  • Remind everyone of the official hashtag
  • Make announcements and reminders of keynotes, session start times, and any other events like a cocktail hour or party 
  • Let everyone know if a session, talk, or cocktail hour has been delayed, canceled or moved to a different location
  • Make suggestions about where attendees can head for meals or drinks offsite, tagging the handles of those businesses where applicable
  • Introduce speakers by their handles
  • Thank speakers, organizers, and any companies that have provided staff for catering or bars (and be sure to mention their handles too)
  • Answer any questions from attendees, and resolve any problems they bring to light quickly

Also be sure to prominently and consistently use and track the official hashtag you’ve created for your conference, which will tell you everything that went well and everything you can improve for the next time.

SXSWV2V Twitter

Instagram

Instagram is new territory for many marketers, which is why we’ve written a series for those new to the platform over on our Union Metrics Tumblr. Specifically for events you’ll want to check out how to effectively use hashtags, the nuances of sharing to other platforms via Instagram, and even the different moves personal brands should make there (in case you’re an event attendee in the future, wanting to promote yourself and connect with other attendees and organizers).

So whether you’re established on Instagram when you decide to market your event there, or you’ve decided to make the conference the official launch of your Instagram presence, there are a few things to keep in mind. Instagram’s purely visual nature is a strength for any brand looking to tell a succinct story in photographic terms. However, the single-track feed on mobile means that too many posts can easily overwhelm your followers, so established brands with a large following who know only a portion of that following will be present at an event will want to consider setting up a side account if you plan on frequent event updates.

With that in mind, some of the ways to use Instagram at a conference include:

  • To show off the conference venue, including what the weather in the host city is like
  • Share photos of sites to see around the host city
  • Tap into other big communities on Instagram by showing off the #food available on and offsite of your conference (be sure to tag any offsite restaurants and bars that have an Instagram presence, and follow their accounts)
  • Post reminders about meetups in other cities leading up to the conference, or after it, like this one from SXSW V2V
  • Share engaging photo reminders of deadlines for submitting speaker applications, getting a discount on event passes, and more
  • Post photos of keynote speakers, tagging their Instagram accounts with permission so that attendees can get a better idea of who they are
  • Post photos to highlight your event organizers, staff, and even regular attendees to give a behind-the-scenes look at everything that goes into the work of organizing and executing a conference (and tag their accounts too, where appropriate, or at least follow them)

Bonus: If you’re short on resources, use the snappy photo reminders around deadlines as a starting point to share the same reminder across platforms, tweaking the message for each. For example, hashtags don’t seem to increase engagement on Facebook, so if you’re going to use the sharing buttons native to Instagram, wait to post all of your hashtags in the first comment. They’ll work the same way for categorization and discovery across Instagram as when you put them in your initial photo caption, but they won’t clutter your post across platforms. 

SXSW V2V Ig

Tumblr

More and more brands have been experimenting with marketing on Tumblr and seeing some fantastic results. The built-in social aspect allows for amplification of announcements and photo recaps of any event or conference in  a way that’s not possible with traditional blogging platforms. A brand hosting an event on Tumblr might use the platform to:

  • Go into more detail about deadlines and what’s required on applications for speakers, but be sure to put it all behind a cut and underneath a snappy visual (maybe a version of the same one you used on Instagram!) 
  • Use the photo post-type collage option to show off the mood of the event, the venue, official accommodations, shots of the host city, past event parties and attendees, speakers and more (Tumblr automatically builds a collage as you upload multiple photos in one post)
  • Do a series using each of the ideas above, or pull a few of each type into one post for a photo overview. Pull these from Instagram or post a mix of Instagram photos and those from other sources
  • Use embedded video posts to show clips from the speakers you’re featuring, or a video summary of a past event; even a video tour of the host city
  • Video post types will also host SlideShares of presentations using their embed codes, perfect for recaps and previews of sessions and topics from speakers
  • Link to articles or blog posts from event speakers, or quote things past speakers have said using the quote post-type
  • If past event attendees have written up their experiences, link to those as well, or quote excerpts from what they had to say

Remember that Tumblr’s reblogging feature is what makes it so powerful; be sure to reblog anything appropriate or related to your conference from the Tumblrs of your upcoming or past speakers, regular attendees, organizers and more. Doing so will only encourage them to reblog you, amplifying your message to their audiences and possibly tapping new audience members. 

Conference Speaker on Tumblr

Example of a post from a speaker that SXSW V2V could reblog– if they had a Tumblr. 

After all, if they follow your speakers and attendees, it’s likely that they’re interested in the type of event you’re putting on.

The bottom line

Play to each platform’s strengths, and put in the work ahead of time to figure out where your attendees spend the most time. If you have limited resources, put your work into those places. Anything else after that will be a bonus.

Oh, and one more bonus tip: All of these platforms use hashtags, so search each one for any hashtags you can think of that are related to your conference or event to see how people are already talking about it in each place. Keep that tone and style in mind as you plan your approach, or use it to tailor and rethink your approach if you already have a presence there.

Got any questions, or have any ideas or examples of great conference execution across platforms that we’ve missed? Leave it in the comments!

Written by Sarah

July 9th, 2014 at 12:28 pm

10 tips for live-tweeting sports events

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Photo from the official FIFA World Cup Instagram account. Check official accounts other than Twitter to see how the conversation is going across platforms.

The World Cup kicks off today, and with other exciting sports events on the horizon- the NBA Finals, Stanley Cup, US Open, and more World Cup this weekend alone- we thought we’d expand our 9 tips for watching TV on Twitter to include, specifically, sports events:

  1. Definitely announce ahead of time if you’re going to be live-tweeting a game so your followers who can’t watch in real-time can mute you or avoid Twitter as a whole. Sports fans do not take kindly to being spoiled on events they plan to watch later.
  2. Related: “Do not tweet spoilers” is a trickier rule with sports events; after all, how else can you talk about what is going on if you’re not referring to the plays that are being made and how that can or is affecting the game? With enough warning ahead of time that you intend to live-tweet, and use of official hashtags so your followers can mute event-related tweets, you should be fine talking about everything that’s happening in the game.
  3. Check for an official hashtag. These days it’s rarer that a big event won’t have its own hashtag already set up; check official accounts to see which ones they’re using to talk about events and excitement leading up to the big game. @FIFAWorldCup is keeping it simple with #WorldCup this year for the event as a whole, but they’re also using other hashtags for individual matches: #BRACRO for Brazil vs. Croatia, for example.
  4. Mention official accounts for the teams playing, individual players, the organizers, or even the event itself, if applicable. You never know when you might get a retweet, and those accounts often have a large following. (You can find them by searching Twitter for the show name and choosing the official account that pops up with a verified checkmark, or by going to a team or organization’s website – social profiles are usually prominently displayed.)
  5. If you already have a large following for something unrelated to sports- you’re popular YA author John Green, for example- you might consider setting up a second account for live-tweeting sports events, so those who follow you for the latest news about your book-to-movie adaptations won’t have to mute you every time a game comes on, and you can even potentially reach new fans who are sports fanatics.
  6. Interact with other people talking about the game to enrich your conversation, which should help you find new accounts to follow related to your favorite sports teams, events, organizations and more.
  7. That said sports talk can be contentious, so don’t be afraid to mute someone who is especially volatile, or even block them if they become excessively aggressive or rude.
  8. If you’re having a party to watch the game with friends, consider posting pictures of your setup, and include guest’s handles in your tweets. Some event sponsors have contests around using their products in watch parties, so check those out ahead of time to see if you can win something for a party you were planning to throw anyway!
  9. Share your content to other networks like Tumblr and Instagram. If you’re trying to build a following around live-tweeting games (something you could translate into writing articles, perhaps) you might consider condensing the best of your live-tweets into a story and putting them on your Tumblr, or using Instagram to share a visual live-tweeting of your watch party. But be careful of auto-sharing everything you post elsewhere; those who follow you in multiple places might get bothered by the redundancy and decide to unfollow you. It’s great to cross-post some, but be selective.
  10. Related to that: See what the conversation is like about these events on other networks. What’s the World Cup conversation like on Tumblr, or Instagram? Seeing how people talk about it in those places can give you new outlets to discuss your favorite sports, new ideas for how to talk about them, and new accounts and people to connect and share with.

Do you tweet while you watch sports? Got any tips we missed? Tell us how you do it in the comments below!

Written by Sarah

June 12th, 2014 at 1:02 pm

Posted in Events,Guides

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The first Vine from space

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NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman posted the first Vine from space this weekend, condensing hours on the ISS and an orbit showing a never-quite-setting sun into six seconds:

Social media has been the perfect tool for NASA to use to educate the public about their work, and give curious citizens direct access in real time to the astronauts living and working in space above us. The Vine was shared by many in the Twitter science community dedicated to science education and outreach:

After all, the projects started up there often come back down to earth to be used in our daily lives, and new windows into science education are the best way to spark the interest of the next generation of scientists and inventors.

Written by Sarah

June 10th, 2014 at 12:39 pm

Apple’s WWDC 2014 by the numbers

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Chances are you’ve seen some of the big announcements coming out of Apple’s Worldwide Developer’s Conference (WWDC 2014) in San Francisco this week, and we thought we’d take a look at the size of the entire conversation around it. Since the conference started on Monday, 704.6k tweets have been made so far about the WWDC by 266.2k contributors for a reach of 151.1 million unique Twitter accounts.

Some of the most retweeted tweets so far have come from John Shahidi (Co-Founder, creator, and CEO of Shots, an app for selfies and photos) and from Tim Cook, CEO of Apple:

 

If you want to keep up with the conference as it continues through Friday, check out these top five hashtags:

  1. #WWDC14
  2. #WWDC
  3. #Apple
  4. #iOS8
  5. #WWDC14_Ar

Written by Sarah

June 4th, 2014 at 9:24 am

Summer travel heats up on social media: It’s #VegasSeason!

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Summer travel season, meet #VegasSeason: A well-executed summer travel campaign that crosses from traditional advertising to social media channels in a way that gets each audience interested, even if they aren’t aware of the contest tied to it.

The contest

Vegas itself wants to give you two chances to win a trip there, and the trip can be “naughty” or “nice”. If the holiday season is all about giving, then Vegas Season is surely all about living and treating yourself. What better than a Vegas hashtag in your Twitter feed- or a snappy commercial on your TV featuring that hashtag- to inspire some last-minute summer travel to Sin City?

The social execution

Scrolling down on the official contest page, there’s a section for sharing about traveling to Vegas on Twitter that has two choices: One about tanning, and one about champagne. Their tweet about having enough champagne is being shared at a much higher rate than their tweet about tanning: over 500 RTs vs. 13.

This is also the tweet currently pinned to the top of their account page, so it’s the first one anyone sees when they visit their profile. Smart use of the Twitter redesign! (Scrolling further down the contest page there are sections for visiting their other social sites: InstagramPinterestVine and YouTube.)

Most #VegasSeason tweets are directly related to the contest, but some are inspired by its accompanying commercials. The official Vegas Twitter account serves as a great hub for redirecting followers to their accounts on other platforms, hosting other elements of the contest. For example, one leads to a Facebook page offering a free download of the song featured in the Vegas Season music commercial:

Some Twitter users have just seen the commercials and may not be aware of the contest to win a free trip, but are still inspired to tweet their excitement about their own summer plans to travel to Vegas using the hashtag:

#VegasSeason has also shown up alongside the #TravelTuesday Twitter chat hashtag (you can learn more about that and other Twitter travel resources in our updated post) where participants discuss all things travel, including current travel plans and dream destinations, all day on Tuesdays. Tweet chats are an easy way to connect with and expand your audience.

The takeaway

Adding hashtags to commercials isn’t a new tactic in advertising, but it is a smart move for something that gets as much chatter on social media as travel does, especially when wanderlust hits during the summer months. Cross-promoting contest elements across platforms with incentives like song downloads increases the contest reach, as does building in easy-to-share content for each platform on the contest page itself.

Travel companies of all kinds should definitely have a social presence, use it creatively, and be sure they’re measuring their share of voice in the industry.

Written by Sarah

May 28th, 2014 at 3:52 pm

Posted in Events

Tagged with ,

Travel resources on Twitter and more: Updated

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With Memorial Day approaching this weekend, summer travel is on the minds of many, and the resources to plan and execute the best trips for business or for pleasure lie within the social sites you know and love. Last year we looked at the Top travel resources on Twitter: Accounts to follow and chats to attend as well as the 10 best travel resources on social media and beyond. So what does the travel landscape look like on social in 2014?

On Twitter

All of the travel advice and perspective accounts from our Twitter travel resources post are still active and providing information on everything from amateur and budget travel to high-end luxury accommodations; skim the list to find and follow the users that fit your needs.

As for the travel chats, read over the transcripts to get an idea of which ones would be worth joining in on before you plan your next trip:

  • #MexMonday (all day Mondays): Check this one out if you’re planning a trip to Mexico 
  • #TravelTuesday (all day Tuesdays): Chat about all things travel-related
  • #CruiseChat (2pm EST Tuesdays): Whether you’re a veteran cruiser or new to boat-bound travel, find out all you need to know in this chat
  • #NUTS (Not-so-usual-therapy-session, aka travel and specifically roadtrips) seems to be used more as a generic hashtag than a travel related chat, but you can still check out the session recaps on their site.
  • #TTOT (5:30 am/pm EST Tuesdays): standing for Travel Talk on Tuesdays, you can check out the topic ahead of time on their Facebook page.
  • #LuxChat (2:30pm PST every 3rd Wednesday): While #LuxChat doesn’t always cover travel, keep an eye on the month’s chosen topic if treating yourself while you travel is your goal. You can find recaps of their chats on their Tumblr.
  • #TourismChat (2:00pm CST bi-weekly on Thursdays): Check the @tourismchat account for topics and transcripts.
  • #FriFotos (all day Fridays): You can find out each week’s theme from @EpsteinTravels

Other chats to check out:

Aren’t sure how to participate in a Twitter chat, or want to host your own? Check out our posts about how to get the most out of a chat as a participant or as a host.

Other social media travel resources

All of our holiday travel tips from last year still hold true, and if you’re looking at how to get the most out of travel blogging on Tumblr we’ve covered that too. (You can see all of our travel-related Tumblr posts here.)

We still recommend Pinterest for planning what you’re going to pack, what sites you want to see at your destination, and more. Instagram is an amazing way to catalog your travels that lets everyone at home follow along with you and avoids overwhelming them with an album of 200 new photos to parse when you get home.

But what about using Instagram for inspiring and planning your next trip? Stay tuned. We’ll have that for you soon!

If you’ve got any social media travel resources we missed, leave them in the comments, or let us know on Twitter.

Photo courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery. 

Written by Sarah

May 21st, 2014 at 1:31 pm

Join us for a TweetReach Pro demo TODAY at 9am PDT!

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Join us for a short demo this Thursday, May 1st- that’s today!- at 9:00am PDT and we’ll walk you through TweetReach Pro, our historical analytics and our snapshot reports.

Demos usually take 15-20 minutes followed by an open Q&A session. At the end, attendees will receive a discount code that can be applied to a TweetReach Pro subscription.

You can register here. Hope you can make it!

Written by Sarah

May 1st, 2014 at 6:16 am

Join us for webinars 4/22 and 4/23 to learn more about our Instagram analytics and Social Suite!

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Want to learn more about our new Instagram analytics or the Union Metrics Social Suite? Join us for a webinar or two; we’ve got one covering each new product. Learn more and see the new analytics in action.

Union Metrics for Instagram

April 22, 9:00 a.m. PDT

Union Metrics Social Suite

April 23, 9:00 a.m. PDT

ig3-1A screenshot of our Union Metrics for Instagram analytics. 

Written by Sarah

April 22nd, 2014 at 7:57 am

Game of Thrones Season 4: Updated Twitter numbers

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We’re three episodes into the fourth season of Game of Thrones on HBO and the talk has certainly not died down since the premiere and just keeps growing: 845.5k tweets have been posted  from 420.7k contributors for a unique reach of 141.7 million users, all around the show and its latest season, since April 6th. (That’s 500k+ more tweets, 20ok+ more contributors and nearly 30 million more unique accounts reached since our last post!)

While actress Sophie Turner’s tweet is still in the top three most retweeted around the show’s conversation, the announcement of being renewed for two more seasons from the show’s official account has taken the number one spot with over 12k retweets:

Followed closely by another of the show’s official tweets:

Top tags continue to be those promoted and supported by the show’s brand (and they now include #purplewedding for events from the second episode) and the show’s Twitter account is the top contributor to the conversation, followed closely by entertainment brands- @peoplemag@RollingStone, and @MTVnews - supporting and spreading GoT talk to interested fans and followers. These accounts share a mix of show recaps, behind-the-scenes interviews with cast members, and even some fan RTs; all great supporting materials to HBO’s own Game of Thrones Viewer’s Guide.

HBO’s heavy involvement in the show’s fandom online illustrates the balance brands need to strike in social television: Give the people what they want in terms of special, behind-the-scenes access and places to discuss the show and characters that they love, and work to add to the conversation with hashtags and resources without dominating it. HBO is nailing it.

Written by Sarah

April 21st, 2014 at 12:40 pm