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This Week in Social Media Analytics #67

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

It’s a woman’s (social media) world [from Pew Research; written by Maeve Duggan]

“Historically, women have been especially avid users [of social media]. Between December 2009 and December 2012, women were significantly more likely than men to use social networking sites in nine out of ten surveys we conducted. During this period, the proportion of women who used social media sites was 10 percentage points higher than men on average. When we include earlier surveys and our latest reading (spanning May 2008 through May 2013), the average difference [in social use between genders] falls slightly to 8%. Currently, three-quarters (74%) of online women use social networking sites.”

Check out the piece for information on gender-specific use of different platforms as well. (Emphasis above added.)

How The 70/30 Rule Can Rocket Your Twitter Presence To The Top [from All Twitter; written by Lauren Dugan]

“70 percent of the time, you should tweet others’ content. 30 percent of the time, you should tweet your own, branded or promotional, content.

This means that the majority of the time, you’re looking for content to share with your followers that is not created by your brand. That could include things like interesting blog posts, news articles, photos, videos… content from around the web that’s produced by others.”

4 Things Small Businesses Must Understand About Social Marketing [from Social Media Today; written by Mark Cooper]

“Before you launch a Facebook campaign, or start tweeting incessantly, ask a simple question: What are the key objectives I want to accomplish?”

Is Little Data the Next Big Data? [from LinkedIn; written by Jonah Berger]

“Measurement is great. Without it we don’t know where we are, how we’re doing, or how to improve. But we need to be careful about how we use it. Because without realizing it, measurement determines rewards and motivation. It determines what people care about, what they work to achieve, and whether they cheat to get there. Tracking student test scores helps measure achievement, but it also encourages teachers to teach to the test.

So before you obsess over a particular metric, make sure it’s the right metric to obsess over. “

CA School District Announces It’s Doing Round-The-Clock Monitoring Of Its 13,000 Students’ Social Media Activities [from TechDirt; written by Tim Cushing]

A new precedent in security? Students can opt out by making their accounts private, but the company monitoring their activity thinks they won’t choose to. It’s unclear how they will locate all the students’ accounts in order to track them. An interesting read for sure.

Big Social Data: The Second Era Starts [from Social Media Explorer; written by Doug Kessler]

“There’s no structure. Context is buried or lost. The torrent never stops. And the sheer volumes are staggering. This kind of data challenge demands a new kind of analytics stack that doesn’t rely on neat little databases and tidy indexes.”

How To Plan And Manage A Social Marketing Strategy And Still Have Time For Dinner [from Web. Search. Social.; written by Carol Lynn Rivera]

“I’ll tell you exactly the trick I use to focus our social marketing efforts: I think of the one specific person that I’m posting something for.”

Americans More Likely to Share “Funny” Than “Important” Content on Social Media [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“In fact, American respondents were more likely than the average respondent across the 24 countries to typically share funny content (49% vs. 43%).”

The popularity of The Daily Show has been cracked.

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Written by Sarah

September 13th, 2013 at 9:21 am

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