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Archive for March, 2013

This Week in Social Analytics #43

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

4-in-5 Americans multitask while watching TV [from Marketing Charts]

“Significant numbers of consumers around the world are indeed using their mobile devices to discuss TV programs on social networks as they watch them, even if Americans appear to be behind the curve in that regard.”

Why data without a soul is meaningless [from GigaOM; written by Om Malik]

“What will it take to build emotive-and-empathic data experiences? Less data science and more data art — which, in other words, means that data wranglers have to develop correlations between data much like the human brain finds context. It is actually not about building the fanciest machine, but instead about the ability to ask the human questions. It is not about just being data informed, but being data aware and data intelligent.”

5 Digital Marketing Insights from a New Gartner Study [from Social Media Today; written by Chris Horton]

“When asked which three digital marketing activities are most important to their success, the marketers surveyed listed a corporate website, digital advertising, and a presence on social media.”

Link to Gartner study here

Global media consumption: the digital reality [from The Global Web Index]

“GLOBAL TIME SPENT: Digital is 57% of daily media time. Social 48% of online.”

 

People Try to Put us D-down, Talkin’ ‘Bout Your Reputation – Part 2: Understanding and Acting on What You’ve Discovered [from Social Media Explorer; written by Jim Berkowitz]

Understand and act on what you’ve discovered from listening, as discussed in Part 1 on this topic.

The Definitive Guide to Online Reputation Management [from the KISSMetrics blog; written by Daniele Virgillito]

An outline of the concepts and steps involved in monitoring your reputation online.

Written by Sarah

March 29th, 2013 at 10:11 am

TweetReach Tip: Find & engage influencers on Twitter with TweetReach snapshot reports

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You can do a lot with your TweetReach snapshot reports and Trackers, and one of the most important and often underutilized tricks is identifying and then interacting with your biggest influencers on Twitter. How? It’s pretty simple:

  1. Run a TweetReach snapshot report
  2. Check out your contributors

That’s it. It’s that easy! Here are some screenshots from a report we ran about Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield:

Top contributors shows you the top Twitter accounts talking about Col. Hadfield. @Gizmodo earned the highest number of impressions from their tweets about the astronaut, @NewsBreaker garnered the most retweets, and @csa_asc (the Canadian Space Agency) generated the most mentions. (You can find a breakdown of a snapshot report here if you need one.)

What do these numbers mean? Exposure is the total number of times a tweet is delivered to Twitter streams, or the overall number of impressions generated. A high exposure means that account has a lot of followers, and tweets from that account were delivered to lots of other Twitter accounts. NewsBreakers got the most retweets, meaning many of that account’s followers found the Hadfield-centered tweet interesting enough to pass along to their followers. Finally, the Canadian Space Agency Twitter handle was mentioned in the most tweets about Col. Hadfield.

If you run regular snapshot reports and notice that you have repeat top contributors, those are definitely accounts you want to engage with,  if you aren’t already doing so. And remember, you can save your TweetReach reports if you create a free account, or download PDFs or CSVs for later reference.


Don’t just limit yourself to your top contributors either; be sure to look at the full list of contributors. Paying attention to everyone who is talking about you or your brand will let you see who is retweeting your content and generating impressions. These people might not be able to generate as many impressions as an account like Gizmodo because they have fewer followers, but having lots of followers isn’t necessarily as important as being able to influence others. Not everyone following Gizmodo will be interested in everything they retweet or talk about, but someone with a lot of pull with his or her followers – even if there are only 200 – may actually have more followers paying attention, possibly even clicking through and reading a link, or ultimately purchasing something. If that kind of person is consistently in your contributors list, you should be engaging with him or her.

How do you engage? Follow these accounts and talk to them when it’s natural. Do they take part in Twitter chats? If it’s relevant, join in. This will lead you to more likeminded people to connect with. Do they share interesting content? Retweet or reply to it; start a conversation.

On a related note, looking closely at contributors is also a great way to connect with those who are influential in your industry, or about the topic you’re tracking. Then later, if you want to join into that conversation, you know who to talk to.

So that’s how to do this with a snapshot report. How’s it different with a Tracker? We’ll cover that in our next post. Stay tuned, and as always, comment with any questions!

Written by Sarah

March 28th, 2013 at 1:03 pm

TweetReach Tracker 2.0 now available to everyone!

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A few weeks ago, we released a first look at the beta version of our all-new TweetReach Tracker 2.0! Today, we’re happy to announce that the beta is now available to all TweetReach Pro subscribers.

TweetReach Tracker 2.0

If you’re currently a TweetReach Pro subscriber, the next time you view a Tracker, you can opt to see the new version. Use the links in the top right corner of your Tracker to change from the old design to the new one. For the next month or so, you will be able to toggle between the old version and the new version with those links. (And if you’re not yet a TweetReach Pro subscriber, sign up here.)

old to new

 We’ll let you know in advance before the full switchover happens and the old version becomes unavailable. In the meantime, there’s more information about what’s included in the new Tracker on our helpdesk. And please let us know if you have any questions!

 

Written by Jenn D

March 27th, 2013 at 4:14 pm

Posted in News

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This Week in Social Analytics #42

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Tumblr Is Worth a Look at For Your Business [from Business2Community; written by Matthew Simonton]

“If your business targets anyone in his or her teens or 20s, you should have a presence on Tumblr. Even if those youngest in these demographics are not your target audience, where do you think they will be in a couple of years? There are reasons why brands beyond College Humor have Tumblr accounts. Huggies has one. Sesame Street has one. Do you see the trend?”

This graph represents the % of respondents who said that they used X platform for at least several hours in a week.

Social Media And The Workplace [INFOGRAPHIC from AllTwitter; post written by Shea Bennett]

“More than half (52.1 percent) of firms now let all of their employees access social media sites at work, with only a little more than one quarter (26.4 percent) actively blocking access to these channels. And while almost two-thirds (64.2 percent) don’t monitor the use of Twitter and Facebook in the office, 68.9 percent do have a social media policy in place.”

State Of The News Media: Everything In Decline But Digital [from Marketing Land; written by Greg Sterling]

“In particular social media figure more prominently as a news ‘channel’ than even a couple of years ago. According to a 2012 Pew Research Center study, 19 percent of Americans received news or headlines on a social network ‘yesterday.’ The number was almost double (34 percent) for people in the 18 – 24 age category.”

Link to the full Pew study here.

Integrate Big Data Into Your Marketing Strategy [from Social Media Today; written by Yoav Dembak]

“I wanted to share a few easy ways anyone can start integrating analytics into marketing campaigns.”

A great short piece for those shaky on their feet, starting out in social media marketing.

New Study Confirms Correlation Between Twitter and TV Ratings [from Nielsen]

“Specifically, the study found that for 18-34 year olds, an 8.5% increase in Twitter volume corresponds to a 1% increase in TV ratings for premiere episodes, and a 4.2% increase in Twitter volume corresponds with a 1% increase in ratings for midseason episodes. Additionally, a 14.0% increase in Twitter volume is associated with a 1% increase in TV program ratings for 35-49 year olds, reflecting a stronger relationship between Twitter and TV for younger audiences.”

 

Written by Sarah

March 22nd, 2013 at 9:05 am

Twitter Tips: Keyboard shortcuts for navigating on the site

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We’re all busy, and some of us are too busy to bother with our computer’s mouse or trackpad. If that sounds like you, check out this handy list of Twitter keyboard shortcuts (we posted something similar over on Tumblr, if you’re into keyboard navigation on all of your social sites):

B → block user
U → unblock user
F → favorite
J → next tweet
K → previous tweet
L → close open tweets
M → new direct message
N → new tweet
R → reply
T → retweet
G + A → activity page
G + C → connect page
G + D → discover page
G + F → favorites
G + H → home
G + L → lists
G + M → messages
G + P → profile
G + R → mentions
G + S → settings
G + U → go to a profile
Space → page down
/ → search
. → load new tweets
? → load shortcut menu

Got any we missed? Leave them in the comments. Happy shortcut tweeting!

Written by Sarah

March 19th, 2013 at 12:06 pm

Posted in Guides

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Learn more about TweetReach Pro in a webinar on March 20

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Did you know you can do more with TweetReach Pro? Learn about the ongoing, full-fidelity and comprehensive metrics available through a Pro account in this short demo webinar we’re hosting Wednesday, March 20 at 11:00 a.m. PDT.

Register here.

We’ll show you how TweetReach Pro works, what’s included and answer any questions you have. And? Attendees will be eligible for a special discount coupon. See you Wednesday!

Measure more with TweetReach Pro
(Photo courtesy SMU Central University Libraries)

 

 

Written by Sarah

March 15th, 2013 at 3:20 pm

Posted in News

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This Week in Social Analytics #41

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Where to Put That Extra Dough in Your Marketing Budget [from Social Media Explorer; written by Jason Spooner]

5 questions to ask before you start spending money on new marketing initiatives

Social Media Marketing Budgets To Double In Next Five Years [Report from Daze Info; written by Shilpa Shree]

Social media spending as a percentage of marketing budgets will increase to more than twofold over the next five years, according to a Duke University Fuqua School of Business survey of US marketers commissioned by the American Marketing Association (AMA). This survey was conducted in February 2013 and included 468 U.S. chief marketing officers.

Powering Predictions With Social Media Data [from AllAnalytics; written by Beth Schultz]

“In the end, social media can really stand on its own and provide insights and a lot of great learning and opportunity, but if you go well beyond just pure brand listening, the potentials are far greater.”

Insight from SXSW: Brands Should Want Advocates, Not Influencers [from Social Media Today; written by Christianna Giordano]

“An influencer is someone will write up a branded post, send out a few tweets and do their tasked outlined in their contract. An advocate, will not only do all those things, but will continuously use the product or brand in their daily lives, insert themselves into relevant conversations concerning the topic, and will fight for the products they love. Both of these types of blogger have their part in the blogosphere, but it is the latter that will make the biggest impact for brands.”

You Got Your Interwebs in My Idiot Tube [from the Austin Chronicle; written by Richard Whittaker]

“The approach was not that there was just a social media department, but every piece of that business, right from the top to the creative teams to the live events staff to the writers to the superstars themselves, now have a stake in telling that story for the fans that really expect it on a 24/7 basis.”

What’s the next excuse? [from KD Paine's PR Measurement Blog; written by KD Paine]

“The truth is in this other revealing statistic: 21% of survey respondents  think that measurement isn’t necessary, so lack of standards are just yet another silly excuse not to measure anything.”

Written by Sarah

March 15th, 2013 at 11:02 am

SXSWi 2011 vs. SXSWi 2013 in numbers

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Two years ago we did a recap of SXSWi 2011 in tweets after the five days of the Interactive portion of the festival were over. (In case you’re still unfamiliar, SXSW is a great big gathering of all kinds of interactive professionals – from social media folks to software developers and startup founders, to designers, researchers and basically anyone interested in the digital space. SXSW Interactive is a tech conference, and is followed by the film and music portions of the festival.)

Here’s a table comparing the tweet volume, total number of unique contributors, and overall reach for 2011 vs. 2013:

SXSWi 2011 vs 2013 table shot

What a difference two years can make!

Here’s a breakdown of the 2013 SXSW tweet activity:

Activity breakdown for tweets during SXSWi 2013

Activity breakdown for tweets and contributors during SXSWi 2013

Were you at SXSWi? How was your experience? Tell us in the comments, old hats and newbies alike.

Written by Sarah

March 13th, 2013 at 11:14 am

This Week in Social Analytics #40

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Advisers benefit from “listening” on social media [from Reuters; written by Beth Pinsker]

“Josh Brown, a financial adviser at New York-based Fusion Analytics who is known as The Reformed Broker to his 35,000-plus Twitter followers, says many of his friends at major brokerage firms regularly visit sites like Twitter, just to keep tabs on the chatter.”

Social Media in the Banking Industry [from Social Media Today; written by David Wittlinger]

“The mental hurdle that bank officers needed to overcome when starting out in social media was the fear of ‘losing control’ of their marketing message.  For many of the Marketing Committee members, platforms like Facebook were widely misunderstood.  A majority of time at the beginning of this project was spent educating the bank about how social media marketing works (different from traditional media) and how it can effectively be applied to create a deeper loyalty within their customers.”

Twitter Reaction to Events Often at Odds with Overall Public Opinion [from Pew Research Center]

“At times the Twitter conversation is more liberal than survey responses, while at other times it is more conservative. Often it is the overall negativity that stands out. Much of the difference may have to do with both the narrow sliver of the public represented on Twitter as well as who among that slice chose to take part in any one conversation.”

Pew Research Twitter Opinion

See the full article for charts on when Twitter’s reaction was more conservative, when it nearly matched public sentiment, and more.

The Content Crash [from Mitch Joel]

“. . .there is a common thought in the digital universe that goes like this: create relevant content and consumers will continue to connect with your brand. It’s not a zero-sum game and it’s not an all-encompassing strategy. It may be in marketers vested interest to adjust that theory to this: create relevant content and your heavy users may continue to connect with your brand.”

21 Social Media & Content Marketing Tips Tailored For Small Businesses [from Heidi Cohen]

Consists of “7 Questions Every Small Business Must Ask To Succeed” and “Actionable Marketing Tips” for each point

Dealing with Social Media Criticism: Deflect, Defy, Defend? [from KISSMetrics; written by Neil Patel]

“According to a study by RightNow, when customers did receive a response to their complaint, almost half of them were pleased by the company’s interaction, and 22% of those customers posted a positive comment about the company or brand. Keep in mind that this is the same company they were bashing just recently.”

Written by Sarah

March 8th, 2013 at 9:55 am

TakeFive with TweetReach – Brian Conway

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TakeFive with TweetReach - Brian Conway

Welcome back to TakeFive with TweetReach, our ongoing interview series with influential members of the Twitter measurement universe. This week, we’re excited to speak with Brian Conway, Account Supervisor for Weber Shandwick, about his experiences with social media and how his initial personal use of the medium lead to a deeper understanding for the impact and potential use it had for brands. He takes this insight with him into projects with current clients, such as American Airlines.

TweetReach: Let’s start with talking about how you got started using social media. Can you describe your first “ah-ha” moment?

Brian Conway: My initial experience with social media was in the mid-2000s for personal use when platforms like Facebook and Twitter had really only made a name for themselves as being unique to the individual experience. It wasn’t until 2008 or 2009 that I started paying much closer attention to how those same individual messages aggregate over time to form a larger brand picture that can be pretty — or pretty ugly. The fact that individuals suddenly had so much influence over a company’s brand reputation and strategic direction was a huge eye-opener for me— that was my “ah-ha” moment. This understanding has since influenced how I’ve approached some of the community management and crisis roles I’ve held for a variety of clients.

TweetReach:How have you seen your clients approach Twitter as part of their digital strategy?

Brain Conway: Broadly speaking about Weber Shandwick, the number of clientele using Twitter and other social media platforms has exploded tremendously in the last three or four years. Nearly all use Twitter for some kind of public engagement, and that ranges from corporate news to marketing announcements to social customer service. Others still use it for listening only. Message reach and response is always important, but what we encourage companies to look for are individual conversations, sentiment, and reach of positive messages. Brand-building or brand regress happens over time, so any corporate Twitter strategy needs to take ongoing listening into big consideration. From my personal experience, I’ve been very closely tied to American Airlines’ social media program since 2009, and Twitter has become a hugely invaluable engagement resource, as well as a strong component of its award-winning social customer service program.

TweetReach: How important is measurement of engagement on Twitter to your strategy with clients? Do you have specific goals and campaign metrics that you use to measure performance and success?

Brian Conway: Measurement of social engagement, be it Twitter or any other platform, is as crucial as your digital strategy. After all, a company doesn’t devote budget and time to a platform simply for the sake of grins, right? I often advocate for a well-balanced approach to quantitative and qualitative measurement for clients, and it all starts with goals. If your campaign goals focus squarely on follower growth or message reach as a measure of success, it’s very easy to track those KPIs quantitatively. But, we believe our clients need to know not just how many conversations there were, but what was actually said and what it means for the company’s business objectives.

TweetReach: Along those lines, let’s talk about the measurement of reach. How do you weigh the importance of the quantity of a campaign’s reach (the overall size of the potential audience) vs. the quality of that reach?

Brian Conway: As I mentioned, it’s very important to have a well-balanced mix of quantitative and qualitative analysis for any social media campaign, proactive or reactive. Again, it all comes back to goals and what kind of success you want to achieve for your organization. Some social campaigns may lend themselves more toward KPIs like audience reach, impressions, sales growth, volume of submissions, awareness-generation, volume of tweets using your hashtag, and the like. Other campaigns may focus more on engagement. Some important qualitative questions to ask: What message points resonated best with our followers? Did our posts trigger any unexpected conversations? How does this Twitter campaign help us prepare for the next one?

TweetReach: Do you have any examples of how analytics have helped you adjust or improve your social media activities? Has this ever happened in the middle of a campaign?

Brian Conway: In one instance for a former client, we had pre-determined the entire course of proactive messaging for the client’s social media campaign. Almost halfway into the campaign, our tracking and reporting revealed significant conversations around a storyline we hadn’t even considered, and it gave us cause to revise our messaging strategy to make sure we spoke more about this other storyline people obviously wanted to discuss. When we reported our findings to the client, we were met with some understandable skepticism about changing our strategy, but in the end, we showed that adaptability and commitment to listening can contribute to campaign success— which is exactly what we saw.

Brian assists with the coordination and management of digital/social media programs at varying levels of strategic corporate engagement, including brand reputation management, outreach strategy, new business development, and crisis monitoring and program implementation. Currently, Brian supports a number of Weber Shandwick clients’ social media programs, including American Airlines and Essilor of America. Among Brian’s primary expertise are community management and message engagement, proactive social campaign strategy, social media crisis comnunications, and blogger relations strategy.

Written by Sarah

March 6th, 2013 at 12:08 pm