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Archive for January, 2013

TweetReach Tip: Common Tracker mistakes

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Much like the double-tap method is essential for zombie eradication, double- and triple-checking your Tracker queries is essential to success with your TweetReach Pro Trackers. Be sure you aren’t making any of the following common mistakes with your Tracker setup, and you’ll get the best results possible with your Tracker.

Mistake #1: Not making the tweets you send from your own Twitter account easily trackable.

  • Put your hashtag toward the beginning of your campaign tweets. If you put it toward the end, it could get cut off in subsequent retweets. Also be sure you keep your campaign tweets to a shorter, shareable length; the “perfect tweet length appears to be around 100 characters”, according to a study by TrackSocial.
  • If you begin a tweet with someone’s Twitter handle – for example, @tweetreachapp – only that account and anyone who follows both of you will see it. Be sure to add a period or other text to the beginning of the tweet if you want to gain the largest impression possible: “.@tweetreachapp is a great tool”. You can read more about @replies and impressions on our helpdeskThe bottom line: if you want to track a tweet and get the most data about it possible, don’t start it with a Twitter handle.

Mistake #2: Small errors in your Tracker queries can keep you from getting the data you need.

  • Make sure you’ve set up the right search terms in your Tracker. For example, banana won’t capture tweets including the word bananas. And #banana will only find uses of the hashtag, but not general uses of the word banana. Add multiple queries if you need to (banana, bananas, #banana AND #bananas).
  • Make sure you spell your search terms correctly. It seems basic, but checking on this will save you from missing data. Also keep be sure to add queries to include accented characters and punctuation, as well as alternative spellings. For example: “shop ‘til you drop” and “shop til you drop”, or  dakar perú and dakar peru. 
  • Make sure you’re using the right form of your hashtag, or search for multiple hashtags if appropriate. Likewise, make sure the tweets you’re sending out have the correct hashtag, and do what you can to communicate the official version to participants. Sometimes, you may need to adapt and track audience-generated hashtags; the official form doesn’t always get the use you’re expecting.

Want more tips on improving your search queries? You can read all about it here. And if you have any questions about your Trackers, just ask!

Written by Sarah

January 30th, 2013 at 7:30 am

Posted in Help

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This Week in Social Analytics #34

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Are You Marketing Your Marketing? [from Social Media Explorer; written by Jason Falls]

“Or, to put it somewhat differently, the social media world is not one of, ‘If you build it, they will come.’ It’s a world where you have to build it, then tell everyone in the world about it a dozen times, then some of them will come.”

Twitter Tips for Proper Use by Brands [from Social Media Today; written by Amanda Ashworth]

“People are looking for better, faster and more personalised means of communicating with brands. Research from Gartner in late 2012 forecasted that social networks will become a primary form of customer communication by 2014 and will be viewed as the minimum form of response. This is hardly surprising when ample research from Socialbakers also suggests that Twitter is 400% more effective at engaging consumers than Facebook.”

How Twitter’s new embeds will make social media’s copyright issues even weirder [from PandoDaily; written by David Holmes]

“Ostensibly, that means all you’d need to do is embed the Tweet containing the copyrighted photo to avoid copyright infringement.”

Twitter CEO Shows Off New Way to Share Videos in Tweets [from Mashable; written by Seth Fiegerman]

“If Costolo’s tweet is any indication, it appears Twitter is planning to integrate Vine to allow users to embed short clips in their tweets in the same way that Twitter now lets users create and share Instagram-style photos in tweets.”

Do We Need Social Media Education in Schools Now? [from Social Media Today; written by Chris Syme]

“The recent story of Manti Te’o is a perfect example of education without learning. He knew how to use social media, but didn’t understand its power.  Have we failed the next generation by equipping them with all the bells and whistles to get connected without teaching them how to use those tools responsibly?”

It’s Time to Cut Back on Social Media [from Harvard Business Review; written by Dorie Clark]

“That doesn’t mean doing less overall or abandoning new media. But it does speak to a desire to prune and focus on the platforms that have the most impact.”

4 Brands that are taking Tumblr by storm [from iMedia; written by our co-founder Jenn Deering Davis]

“There is a social network, ranked among the top 10 sites in the U.S., that has a growing user base of 170 million people who create 70 million new posts each day and are actively seeking new content. And your brand probably hasn’t tapped into it yet. Interested?”

Why 2013 is the Year You Need to Get Serious About Tumblr [from Forbes; written by our co-founder & CEO Hayes Davis]

“Tumblr is a highly visual experience, so brands can appeal to us on a visceral level through stunning images or animated GIFs that capture brief, emotional moments. This kind of visual storytelling has been missing from digital advertising, but is what we’ve come to expect from the best TV ads. Tumblr makes that kind of brand experience finally possible online.”

Written by Sarah

January 25th, 2013 at 8:45 am

TweetReach Product Survey

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Hey friends and fans, got a quick minute? We’d love it and be much obliged if you could take our product survey and let us know how your experience has been.

The feedback will help us keep making things better for you. Thanks!

-The TweetReach Team

Written by Sarah

January 21st, 2013 at 9:44 am

Posted in News

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This Week in Social Analytics #33

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Social Media Marketing: Tumblr Touts Its Value to Its Users and Brands [from Brand Channel; written by Sheila Shayon]

“Marketers are definitely looking to other social networks beyond Facebook,” said a spokesman for eMarketer to the Post, “not because Facebook is ineffective but because the digital audience is more fragmented than ever before.”

Lost On New Myspace. Can’t Escape Justin. Send Help. [from TechCrunch; written by Sarah Perez]

“But I want to really discover. Maybe it gets better when you add friends, I think. Maybe then, like Spotify, you can peer into what other people are listening to. Otherwise, I’m probably going to end up playing 90′s rock, reminiscing, hoping for a grunge comeback.”

Facebook explains how to optimize your business Page for Graph Search [from The Next Web; written by Emil Protalinski]

“Facebook says Graph Search will make it easier for people to discover your Page and learn more about your business. Whether that will indeed be the case remains to be seen, but if you want to stay ahead of the game then you should take the new feature seriously.”

What Facebook’s Graph Search Means for Marketers [from Social Media Explorer; written by Jason Falls]

“For marketers, though, this evolution of the Facebook ecosystem of utility means one thing: You should have been investing in social media marketing all along. Without a strong social presence, particularly on Facebook, your business is not going to have the requisite recommendations, referrals and content necessary to trip this new search mechanism. If you don’t have much presence or traction there now, you’d better get some and fast.”

Instagram Reports 90M Monthly Active Users, 40M Photos Per Day And 8500 Likes Per Second [from TechCrunch; written by Darrell Etherington]

“For perspective, Facebook itself has 37,037 combined Likes and comments per second, according to stats released by the company in August when you break down the daily average they reported at the time. Instagram’s 9,500 similar actions per second definitely trail, but are nonetheless impressive given that Instagram is mobile-only and a much younger service.”

Socializing Your CEO 2013 [from Weber Shandwick]

“Among other findings, the study revealed that sociability of world’s largest company CEOs has nearly doubled – from 36% in 2010 to 66% in 2012.”

7 Things You MUST Understand When Leveraging Social Proof in Your Marketing Efforts [from KISSmetrics; written by Gregory Ciotti]

“In 2013 and beyond, social proof will gain in importance because customers are becoming more informed all the time.”

Tweet My Fridge: The Bizarre Home Appliances of CES [from The Verge; written by Sam Byford]
Just because you can do something doesn’t mean you should.

Written by Sarah

January 18th, 2013 at 11:19 am

FX’s ‘Archer’ nails it with social media

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Archer’s 4th season premieres on FX on January 17th, but fans going through withdrawal have had something special to keep them occupied while waiting for the new episodes – FX set up some very entertaining social media accounts for three of the show’s main characters. In honor of the upcoming new season, we thought we’d take a closer look at this fantastic social campaign.

ISIS Head of HR Pam Poovey graces both Twitter and Facebook with her presence; Secret Agent Sterling Archer, whose Facebook page is the main page for the show, also has his own Twitter account; and the world’s most unsettling Head of Applied Research, Dr. Algernop Krieger is on Facebook and Twitter.

What’s notable about Archer’s social media is the amount of work put into these accounts. They all interact with each other in the voices of the characters. Some updates include new creative content that has been created explicitly for Twitter and Facebook; others include stills from past episodes of the show.

It’s not just snippets of text; it’s Pam taking a selfie in a Three Wolf Moon-inspired shirt.

The best part? This isn’t a social media campaign run by a faceless agency. Pam Poovey’s Twitter account is run by none other than the actress who voices her, Amber Nash, and voice talent Lucky Yates runs Krieger’s accounts. This makes the banter between those accounts so much more enjoyable; the actors get to have fun inhabiting their characters and taking them out for verbal runs at each other between episodes.

Tweets are often also automatically posted to Facebook. At least one fan seems to prefer to see different content on the separate platforms (danger zone!).



Sometimes posts will show up on Twitter that aren’t on Facebook, however:

This is probably related to the specific nature of the content. According to the Archer Live! Tour, the actors have been asked to tone it down a little to better fit within the norms of the social platforms.

The accounts post similar content to both Twitter and Facebook, but now try to fit the content to the appropriate channel. For example, the Archer Facebook page and the Archer Twitter account both responded to a tweet from Lucky Yates as Krieger, but the content was formatted differently for each site. On Twitter: 

And the Facebook version:


This is an improved use of both platforms, since early tweets from Pam that also went to Facebook would simply cut off on a longer message, with a link to her profile to read the rest. Adapting the content to fit each specific platform is a smarter way to manage a transmedia campaign across multiple channels. Fans don’t necessarily want to switch from one network to another to read the full conversation.

While the accounts don’t respond to fans who reply to them, that hasn’t hurt the engagement at all. Fans use the #ArcherFX hashtag along with the characters and the channel’s official Twitter account, and more than a million people were reached through thousands of tweets during first two weeks of January leading up to the season premiere. Activity spiked on Saturday, January 12th, the night of the last Archer Live! Tour date. This final show of the four-city tour took place at Irving Plaza in New York City, and you can read a great recap of it on Uproxx, if you’re interested.

This sort of integrated social TV campaign is a great example of what many shows have started to do both between and during seasons. It’s an effective way to engage and reward loyal fans of the show by sharing behind-the-scenes content, while simultaneously drawing in new fans who might be intrigued by what they see and want to tune in to the new season.

Giving the voice actors the freedom to run social accounts for the characters they’ve been portraying for years is also ingenious. It feels more authentic for fans, who can tell when something is written in Pam or Krieger’s voice, which leads to higher engagement rates and increased enthusiasm for the upcoming season.

FX knows their audience well, and is doing great work in social media by participating in the conversation about their show – in the characters’ voices – where their fans are having that conversation. And it’s completely awesome. Definitely not babytown frolics.

Written by Sarah

January 16th, 2013 at 11:28 am

Posted in Trends

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TakeFive with TweetReach – Beverly Robertson

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Beverly Robertson

Beverly Robertson

Welcome back to TakeFive with TweetReach, our ongoing interview series with influential members of the Twitter measurement universe. This week, we’re excited to speak with Beverly Robertson, National Director of the Pregnancy & Newborn Health Education Center at the March of Dimes (find them on Twitter here). We spoke with her about the incredible opportunity social media presents to disseminate health information, particularly as it pertains to the March of Dimes mission: healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. Beverly hosts a Twitter chat with the hashtag #pregnancychat once a month, featuring revolving topics around health, pregnancy and babies. She also hosts ad hoc chats with the hashtag #preemiechats. More recently, The March of Dimes participated in a joint Twitter chat with the Center for Disease Control for Birth Defect Prevention Month (January) with the hashtag #1in33chat.

TweetReach: Welcome, Beverly! Let’s start with talking about how you got started using social media. Can you describe your first “ah-ha” moment?

Beverly Robertson: Actually, I was in India back in ’07 and saw so many young women texting. Watching them, it struck me: what a tremendous opportunity for delivering health information. When I came back, I looked into creating a texting program for the March of Dimes and it was prohibitively expensive.  BUT Twitter was free, and women could access it through their phones if they wanted to.  March of Dimes joined Twitter in August of 2007.  My vision back then was to offer a pregnancy tip of the day. Everything has changed since then.

TweetReach: When did you start doing the Twitter Chats with March of Dimes? How important was measurement when you started them, and how has that evolved?

Beverly Robertson: We started doing chats on Twitter in April of 2010. In the beginning, I tracked stats as a matter of course– but we now rely on TweetReach to not only see our reach, but understand which topics resonate with our followers and what times of day are best to chat, as well as the importance of having guests.

TweetReach: What has surprised you the most about the chats? What about the data you get from measuring them?

Beverly Robertson: The most surprising thing is the interactivity- no, not even that- it’s the openness with which our followers not only share their personal triumphs and trials, but their gratitude to us as an organization.  Also, don’t host a chat at 3pm ET; people are at the bus stop picking up their kids! Simple really, but it was not on my radar.  The most interesting thing (not really surprising) about the data is it how far a simple retweet will go with the right people with a large following.  On a side note, beyond the chat reports, I love reading the Tracker reports. It is sometimes surprising to see who is talking about the Foundation and the reach the conversation has.

TweetReach: There are many different ways to measure activity, but how does March of Dimes gauge your success?

Beverly Robertson: We look at reach numbers, of course, but also the number of contributors and growth year over year.  I absolutely go back to compare the numbers over time and analyze the strengths, weaknesses, and growth opportunities of the chats– and make changes based on them.

TweetReach: Do you feel the approach or reliance on social platforms is different for a nonprofit organization? What would you recommend to one that is just starting on their social strategy, or is uncertain of how to even begin?

Beverly Robertson: Social Media is critical not only for delivering mission messaging, but in introducing the organization to a new audience, as well as keeping track of what people are saying about you and your mission. It also is critical to take the opportunity to thank your donors and volunteers publicly for all of their hard work and support.  I cannot tell you what a tremendous response we get for doing that.  My recommendation is jump in, but listen before you speak.

TweetReach: The last chat you held in December was on hyperemesis gravidarum, which the Duchess of Cambridge was recently diagnosed with. How do you typically choose chat topics? Did you find more engagement with this one since it related to a recent news event involving a well-known figure?

Beverly Robertson: Some of our chat topics are planned in advance based on a specific monthly activity (November is Prematurity Awareness Month, for example) while other are more spontaneous, like the hyperemesis one (Editor’s note: The March of Dimes held a Twitter chat on December 5, 2012, on the topic of hypermesis gravidarum, or severe, chronic and debilitating morning sickness).  With the flu being so bad this year, we are planning a chat on Flu During Pregnancy on Feb 1st.  I also see what people are talking about in my streams, or ask outright what topics our followers would like to have covered.  I did not find that the hyperemesis chat was better because it was in the news. I think a better lead time and more promotional opportunity is more critical to success than celebrity hype.

TweetReach: Thank you for taking the time to talk with us and share your thoughts and findings, Beverly!

Beverly Robertson is the National Director of the Pregnancy & Newborn Health Education Center at the March of Dimes. Under her leadership, The Center provides information in both English and Spanish via traditional, written and online inquiries as well as through social networking.

She is heavily vested in new media, leading the social media mission messaging team: tweeting on @marchofdimes, and @babytips as well as managing the blogging team for News Moms Need and Nacersano blog.  She holds webinars, workshops and speaks at many conferences on the benefits of social media and the need to engage the public, as well as the importance of Hispanic Outreach.  She keeps a watchful eye on non-profit uses for new technology.

Beverly has a MLS degree from Rutgers University, an MA in history, and an archival certificate from New York University.  She has a BA in Spanish from Ohio State University.

Written by Sarah

January 15th, 2013 at 11:36 am

Checking in on the 2013 Golden Globes on Twitter and Tumblr: What did fans think?

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Awards season is upon us, and this year it kicked off with Tina Fey and Amy Poehler taking over hosting duties at the 70th Golden Globe Awards. We love the Golden Globes; this is the third year we’ve monitored tweets about the event (see our 2012 and 2011 coverage). This year, we’ve been tracking all the social media buzz before, during and after the awards show that aired on Sunday, January 13, 2013, again in conjunction with mhCarter Consulting and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. And we didn’t just stick to Twitter either; for the first time, we also took a look at the night’s Tumblr data!

What were the big numbers on Twitter? 

First, let’s talk Twitter… How did the Golden Globes do on Twitter? Tweets spiked several times the night of the show, showing us when the audience at home was the most excited about events onscreen. The first spike was in the initial minute of the show, which saw 7,700 tweets. Things got chattier after that; when Adele won the award for Best Original Song (Skyfall for the Bond film of the same name) Twitter activity spiked to 13.4k tweets per minute (tpm). Adele was later beat out by the appearance of former President Bill Clinton taking the stage to introduce Lincoln;  tweets further spiked up to 18.5k tweets per minute, claiming the highest tpm spike of the evening.

Ellen highest RT Exposure

@TheEllenShow’s tweet about the hosts saw was the most popular tweet of the night, accumulating the highest exposure and most RTs during the show, with nearly 22 million impressions and 7,991 RTs.

Overall, more than 108 million unique  Twitter accounts were reached by tweets about the Golden Globes - and that’s just on the day of the show. This is up over 14.4 million from 2012, and over three times the reach of Golden Globes Twitter chatter from 2011. Contributors more than doubled this year – from 296K people talking about the Globes in 2012 to 599K in 2013 – and the total number of tweets increased by more than 50% from 2012s (from 822K to 1.3 million).

Looking at all of the data since the nominees were announced on December 13th, 2012, total reach was over 160 million unique accounts, and more than 756K different Twitter users contributed more than 2.1 million tweets.

What were some of the specific things people were talking about on Twitter? 

As part of the excitement approaching the 70th Annual Golden Globes, @GoldenGlobes asked fans to tweet their questions for the nominees with the hashtag #askGlobes; the questions would then be asked of the winners backstage.

One of the top contributors to the hashtag was a fan account for Meryl Streep (@MerylStreepSite), asking and retweeting other Meryl fans’ requests to ask the actress what she thought of her dedicated fans, or “Streepers”.

Streepers

Unfortunately, Meryl didn’t win so the Streepers never got their question answered. Jennifer Lawrence took the trophy for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical, for Silver Linings Playbook– and breathlessly joked about beating Meryl when she took the stage to accept.

The @GoldenGlobes confirmed backstage that “JLaw” has been her nickname for years.

The #askGlobes hashtag for the Golden Globes account was one of their top 5 hashtags for the night of the show; producing a total of 2,016 tweets with a peak activity time of 6pm PT, when the hashtag saw over 4.7 million impressions. The @GoldenGlobes retweeted the questions asked of the winners, with the answers, and kept promoting the hashtag:

What were people talking about on Tumblr? 

Tumblr saw 47.6k posts about the Golden Globes the night of the show. Flouting convention, the majority of the posts were text posts rather than photos: 31K text posts and 18K photo posts. However, the photo posts saw much higher engagement rates. For the total 1.8 million notes, nearly 1.5 million of those notes were on photo posts (814.7K reblogs and 668.2K likes) compared to the smaller 231K notes for text posts.

The most popular post was a GIF of Anne Hathaway accepting her award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture, for Les Miserables: 

Anne Hathaway Acceptance

This post from Beaver Paralyzer earned 66.6K notes in just a few hours, which includes 153 direct reblogs, 36.9K amplified reblogs, and 29.5K likes. The reblog tree for this post was impressively extensive, showing the majority of reblogs occurred out past the 9th degree, suggesting a very diverse pool of curators:

Tumblr top post reblog tree

Indeed, the entire tree doesn’t easily fit on a screen; that’s a little more than half of it there.

The second and third most popular Tumblr posts were also GIFs, in this case two GIF-sets of the hosts making jokes between awards. They’ve already garnered 41.8k and 37.2k notes, respectively.

What does this tell us about watching TV and simultaneously using social platforms? 

While many think of Twitter as the main social channel to talk television – Twitter has their own dedicated @TwitterTV account, after all – more and more people are flocking to Tumblr as well, for its expanded ability to “liveblog” a TV event beyond the relatively text-limited Twitter platform. The ever-popular GIF just doesn’t work as well on Twitter as it does on Tumblr.

Comparing the overall number of tweets made to number of Tumblr posts between December 13 and January 13, there were twice as many tweets about the Golden Globes: 2.1 million tweets vs. 1.0 million Tumblr posts and reblogs.

Looking at unique participants paints a similar picture: 756K users posted tweets on Twitter, and 20K posted on Tumblr, but that Twitter number includes RTs. If you count rebloggers on Tumblr, that’s another 303K (not to mention another 255K likers). The Twitter numbers don’t include favorites, which would be similar to Tumblr likes, but these numbers are still closing the Twitter/Tumblr output gap: 322K posters and rebloggers on Tumblr to Twitter’s 756K tweeters.

Tumblr GG Community

We can wager a guess that those Tumblr numbers will continue to catch up to Twitter numbers as Tumblr gains popularity as a place to discuss a live television event together. This is especially likely considering Tumblr’s reputation as a place for TV show and movie franchise fandoms to set up shop and blog (and reblog) about the characters and worlds they love. Why not start doing it live as well as between seasons of the BBC’s Sherlock?

In the future, we expect to see more fans switching back and forth between Tumblr and Twitter during an awards show or their favorite series, on their phones or laptops, using both sites to their respective strengths. Social TV watching has really only just begun.

That was neat! I want more! 

We’re glad to hear it. If you liked this look at Twitter and Tumblr activity for the 2013 Golden Globes, stay tuned for our more in-depth case study on the event. We’re going to take a deeper look at the various social initiatives the HFPA put together around the show, including the #GlobesParty Instagram promotion the Globes ran to get fans involved at home, and more. Check back soon!

Written by Sarah

January 14th, 2013 at 4:16 pm

This Week in Social Analytics #32

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

There Are 181,000 Social Media ‘Gurus,’ ‘Ninjas,’ ‘Masters,’ and ‘Mavens’ on Twitter [from AdAge; written by B.L. Ochman]

That’s up from 16,000 in 2009.

What CEOs Need to Understand About Social Media [from Social Media Explorer; written by Nichole Kelly]

“One of the key reasons social media has struggled to show ROI is because many current tracking systems only track the last thing a prospect touches before converting, but the social media conversation usually happens before this point and therefore doesn’t get any portion of the credit.”

Watch Out CNN: New Twitter Search Capabilities Will Rule Breaking News [from ReadWrite; written by Jon Mitchell]

“This contextual step is critical for making a news destination relevant. And if Twitter itself can master relevance, what’s the point of other news sites? They’re slower, and they have less information about what’s happening and what’s interesting to people. News organizations had better start thinking about how they can continue to matter in a world where Twitter is the destination, not just a pipe for sending links.”

Best Days to Post on Facebook by Industry [INFOGRAPHIC] [from Spiral 16; written by Eric Melin]

“The thing is: Not all Facebook posts are targeted at the same people, so you have to beware of ‘general research.’ about Facebook or any other social media trend. It may not apply to your industry or audience.”

Teens <3 Tumblr More Than Facebook [from Fast Company; written by Kit Eaton]

“While 55% of 13- to 18 year-olds and 52% of 19- to 25 year-olds liked Facebook for social networking interactions, supporting the conventional notion that Facebook is the world’s dominant social net, 61% of the young group and 57% of the adult group preferred Tumblr.”

Union Metrics CEO on importance of social measurement [from Biz Report; written by Kristina Knight]

Here’s an excerpt from the two-part interview with our CEO, Hayes Davis.

“‘The best ads have always reached us on an emotional level and we’ve kind of abandoned that on social networks and other parts of the web. In a couple years, I think we’ll look back on the last 10 years of tiny, mostly text-based ads as a bit of an aberration. In 2013, we’ll see brands trying to better reach their customers with interesting content combined with resonant visuals. 2012 may have been the year of the GIF, but 2013 will be the year the GIF gets down to business,’ said Davis.”

Written by Sarah

January 11th, 2013 at 9:38 am

The AP sells sponsored tweets to Samsung during CES

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And we took a look at one of them. This week, the Associated Press decided to sell sponsored tweets during the annual CES tech trade show on its @AP Twitter account. A lot of blogs and news outlets discussed the ads, but actual engagement with the sponsored tweets was quite low. Here’s one of the tweets in question:

This sponsored tweet from Samsung got a total of – wait for it – 15 retweets. The activity leveled off rather quickly; 12 of the 15 retweets happened immediately, followed by two in the next hour, and the final straggler the following morning. Then nothing else. There wasn’t very much lasting traction to this tweet, as seen below:

The tweet did generate a total reach of 1,584,824 unique Twitter accounts, but that’s really not much more than the 1,538,203 followers the @AP account itself had at the time of the tweet. A quick look at the top contributors might account for the reason: @AP was the top contributor, followed by @HuffPostMedia and a Japanese Global Media Studies Professor. It would make sense for multiple accounts to follow most or all three of these contributors, as they’re all journalism-related accounts, but it didn’t result in much additional spread of the original ad.

The reach for everyone talking about AP’s sponsored tweets was much higher, with nearly 550 tweets from more than 500 contributors in the past few days, reaching 4.3 million different Twitter accounts. The activity, however, still dropped off rather quickly:


Everyone is talking about the AP selling their tweets (or they were), but the interaction with the sponsored tweets themselves remained low. The three sponsored tweets were only retweeted 21, 15 and 14 times respectively. There were far tweets with more opinions on the subject than actual RTs: opinions tacked onto RTs of articles about it, occasionally added in front of an AP retweet, or sent out and tagged with the AP’s handle. Some, however, went for a more direct route.

Replies to AP about their sponsored tweets were not terribly positive:

They were about as snarky as some of the news and blog coverage was. But why?


Perhaps because people think that as a news source, the AP should remain neutral, and maybe particularly on Twitter, a platform that is poised to become the go-to place for breaking news even more than it already is for its heavy users.

Looking at the data on the entire discussion around AP sponsored tweets seems to back up that idea. Here are a few examples:



The opinion that a major, historically trusted news source should remain neutral might explain why people are upset over the AP selling sponsored tweets, but haven’t been in the past when celebrities have done the same thing (there’s even a company set up exclusively for celebrities or other popular Twitter personalities that want to endorse products on Twitter). Celebrities are expected to supplement their income with product endorsements, and are not followed or revered for their journalistic integrity.

Sponsored tweets aren’t anything new – Mashable wrote an article saying just that back in 2009 – so the amount of attention and news being generated by the AP selling tweets has been puzzling to some. Others, whether or not they’ve paid much attention to it before, simply see it as an expected form of native advertising. Different from the Promoted Tweets that Twitter launched in April of 2010, sponsored tweets are a deal between a vendor and a celebrity or other well-known figure with a large Twitter following, with Twitter getting nothing out of the deal, except perhaps to say that advertising works on its platform.

Former member of The Pussycat Dolls Nicole Scherzinger and a sponsored tweet for Herbal Essences… A little different than the AP and Samsung, or so response would seem to indicate.

Let us know what you think in the comments.

Written by Sarah

January 10th, 2013 at 11:04 am

This Week in Social Analytics #31

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Library of Congress has archive of tweets, but no plan for its public display [from The Washington Post; written by Adrienne LaFrance]

“But the library hasn’t started the daunting task of sorting or filtering its 133 terabytes of Twitter data, which it receives from Gnip in chronological bundles, in any meaningful way.

‘It’s pretty raw,’ Dizard said. ‘You often hear a reference to Twitter as a fire hose, that constant stream of tweets going around the world. What we have here is a large and growing lake. What we need is the technology that allows us to both understand and make useful that lake of information.’”

Tools do exist to measure this raw data: as part of Gnip’s Plugged In To Gnip Partnership, we have access to the full firehose of Twitter data and can help you find the reach of your tweets and more.

2013: Measuring the Intangibles of Social Media [from Social Media Today; written by Jay Deragon]

“These elements are causing a shift from measurement of tangible results to measurement of intangible results. Intangible results are about understanding and measuring intangible capital to effect tangible results.”

2013 Predictions from a bunch of “Dummies” [from Common Sense; written by Aaron Strout]

From the authors of many “______ for Dummies”, predictions mostly in the realm of social media and social media marketing (eBay snuck in there too).

The Shift to Visual Social Media– 6 Tips for Businesses [from Socially Sorted; written by Donna Moritz]

“We also made the shift from Tell to Show.  Facebook, Twitter and Blogs became more visual. Images were showcased everywhere.  Microblogs evolved into Multi-media Microblogs with sites like YouTube and Tumblr offering the rapid, visual transfer of information in entertaining formats.  These platforms allowed us to devour visual material quickly.”

Oh, The Places Tumblr Can Go [from TechCrunch; written by Ingrid Lunden]

“The core of Tumblr’s ‘social’ experience is how people consume and share content based on their interests, rather than through a conversation with their social circles. This has been one of Tumblr’s most distinctive traits, but it also leaves a window open for features that the company might also try to introduce or encourage more in the future.”

Ablogalypse is upon us, right on time [from LOLINBLR; posted by Laura Olin]

“Tumblr” is now more searched than “Blog” on Google

Tumblr: David Karp’s $800 Million Art Project [from Forbes; written by Jeff Bercovici]

Tumblr has momentum:

“When Hurricane Sandy flooded massive data centers in New York, knocking the Huffington Post, Gawker and BuzzFeed offline, all three gravitated to Tumblr as their temporary publishing platform. Hollywood has taken note, with no fewer than three new TV series in development spawned by Tumblr sensations that went viral. And this: When Oxford Dictionaries U.S.A. designated ‘GIF’ its word of the year for 2012, it credited Tumblr with pushing the term, a technical name for a type of compressed image file, into the mainstream.”

Where will 2013 take it?

Written by Sarah

January 4th, 2013 at 10:06 am