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Thoughts on social media analytics from the makers of TweetReach

Archive for August, 2012

TakeFive with TweetReach – Jim Kneer

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Welcome back to TakeFive with TweetReach, our ongoing interview series with influential members of the Twitter measurement universe. This week, we’re happy to highlight Jim Kneer, New Media Specialist for the NBA Champion Miami HEAT basketball team. Coming off a terrific championship season and an Olympic gold medal for Team USA player and Miami HEAT forward Lebron James, we thought it would be a great time to get Jim’s views on Twitter measurement.

TweetReach: Welcome Jim! Can you describe your role in the HEAT organization? How have you used social media, specifically Twitter, as a part of your social media strategy for the team?

Jim Kneer: Our New Media team is the eyes and ears of HEAT fans around the globe. Our job is to connect with as many HEAT fans as we can. We create relationships with our younger fans that will evolve into a strong brand loyalty. We view Twitter as the first true means of establishing two-way communication with our fans.

Our franchise is just entering our 25th season, so we are a relatively young franchise. We are just starting to see our first generation of life-long HEAT fans reach fiscal maturity. It is our goal to take advantage of the amazing team we have to build our fan base and social media, and Twitter specifically, allows us to reach out and communicate with fans.

We use Twitter to provide real-time coverage of all HEAT related news and events. Our New Media team covers all HEAT practices, games and provides behind-the-scenes coverage of HEAT related events.

TweetReach: How important is measurement of engagement on Twitter to your strategy? Do you have specific goals and campaign metrics that you use to measure performance and success?

Jim Kneer: Measurement of social media engagement is key for us. While we may not have specific goals for each initiative we undertake, engagement metrics play a key role in our future initiatives. We like to look at the performance of our tweets and use that data to tailor our coverage to the areas we get the most engagement. We always want to deliver the content our fans want the most.

We also like to use this data to determine time of posting. We want our posts to generate a lot of replies and we try to provide as many answers as time and scheduling allow. Conversely, pictures and posts that will generate a lot of re-tweets are often made during our “off hours” since less attention is required.

TweetReach: Has your social media measurement strategy changed as you’ve gone from the regular season, to the playoffs, to the champion series, to the off-season?

Jim Kneer: During the season, we utilize a lot of the measurements to build our strategy. Each regular season, we find a different tweeting “sweet spot.” Some years we see more interactions of pictures, some years it may be statistical information that gets the best response. Our job during the regular season is to perfect our strategy. Socially, we do not want to be become a nuisance.

I come from an email marketing background. Email marketing has always been referred to as “permission-based marketing.” Moving over to social media, I always treat it as “privilege-based marketing.” We have been lucky to earn a spot in our fans’ timelines and newsfeeds. We treat this as a privilege. We try to avoid straight sales pitches, instead offering exclusive first looks or first opportunities to buy. This gives our sales pitches a more exclusive, offer-based characteristic.

Once we hit the post-season, we intensify our social media efforts. We know that our fans’ appetite for information increases and we begin traveling to away games to help provide coverage to which they may not otherwise have access. This coverage increases each round, as fans want more and more information. During the 2012 NBA Finals, we sent two staff members to Oklahoma City to cover everything, and we were rewarded with a really comprehensive behind the scenes look at the team during our title run.

Our off-season strategy is to provide relevant content when it occurs, but more so to focus on increasing our interactions with fans. We try to reply to as many relevant mentions as we can, while also increasing the amount of interactive tweets we send out.

TweetReach: What’s your opinion on the “second-screen experience” during televised games? Have you seen more consumers actively engaging via Twitter during games and how do you make the most of that for the team?

Jim Kneer: During the regular season, we work very closely with our broadcast partner, Sun Sports/Fox Sports Florida. Last off-season, we had a series of social-broadcast meetings and were able to develop a very interactive broadcast. We developed a Facebook Friday component to help draw viewers to our broadcasts, especially when our local broadcast is up against a national broadcast of the game.

We also got our broadcasters Eric Reid and Tony Fiorentino on Twitter and they were able to interact with fans and answer some questions live during all broadcasts. Additionally, we created a dedicated hashtag to track all comments.

Fans were also actively engaged in twitter polls for the pregame spotlights as well as the poll question for games. We wanted to create a very social feel for our broadcasts and are very happy where they stand after our first season.

TweetReach: Can you describe one of your more successful social media efforts? Were there specific measurement goals you wanted to achieve and how did the campaign perform? Any lessons learned you can share with our audience?

Jim Kneer: I think one of our most successful efforts this year was the unveiling of our new “Black is Back” uniform. We knew this would generate buzz, but the scope of the appeal was amazing. We were able to reach over 4.5 million unique accounts and generate almost 17 million impressions.

We also made a big social media push for the release of our Miami Floridians throwback jersey. This effort reached over 5.8 million unique people and total impressions reached 13 million.

I think the most important thing we took from these campaigns was that we needed to be ready and able to take advantage of these situations the moment they arise. Once we noticed the feedback, the posts, and tweets we were receiving, we really ramped up our efforts. We learned that by monitoring early reaction to a post you can really ride the positive public sentiment and stay ahead of the curve.

TweetReach: Thanks, Jim!

Written by Dean Cruse

August 23rd, 2012 at 7:24 am

TweetReach Tip: Measuring the reach of a Twitter account

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Want to measure the reach of a particular Twitter account? Great – you’ve come to the right place! Our TweetReach snapshot reports can measure the reach of any public Twitter account in just a few seconds. And depending on exactly which tweets you want to include in your analysis, we have a few tips for writing your search queries.

From and About

The From and About report is our most often run report and measures all tweets to, from and about an account. Use this query:

@username OR from:username

This report will return all mentions of that Twitter account (including all types of retweets, replies and mentions), as well as all tweets from that Twitter account. This is the most comprehensive set of reach stats for a Twitter account, and covers all activity with and about an username. We call this the From and About report, because it returns data both from a Twitter account, as well as about a Twitter account. Here’s an example From and About report.

About

The About report will include all mentions, replies and retweets of an account. Use this query with the @ symbol:

@username

This report will let you know how many people are talking about a certain Twitter account, and the ways they’re talking about it (retweets, replies and mentions). It will not include original tweets posted from the account. We call this the About report, since it only returns tweets about an account from other Twitter users. Here’s an example About report.

From

The From report will return only tweets from that account. Use this query with the from: operator:

from:username

This reports is useful for measuring the impact of an individual Twitter account without the noise of mentions and other users’ interaction, and it’s great for learning more about the kinds of tweets that account is posting. We call this the From report, since it only includes tweets from that Twitter account. Here’s an example From report.

From and Retweet

Finally, sometimes you want to know only about an account’s tweets and any retweets of those tweets. The From and Retweet report uses this query:

from:username OR “RT @username”

This report will return tweets from an account, as well as any retweets of that account. This is useful for measuring the impact of an account’s tweets and its retweets, without including other mentions or replies. We call this the From and Retweet report, since it only includes original tweets and retweets. Here’s an example From and Retweet report.

Written by Jenn D

August 21st, 2012 at 12:21 pm

Posted in Help

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Union Metrics SXSW 2013 panels

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The team here at Union Metrics proposed a number of great panels for next year’s South By Southwest conference. They’re all listed below. If you think any of these would be interesting presentations at SXSW, please give us a vote!

Getting started with social data at scale

Featuring these speakers:

  • Ken Little, Director of Engineering, Tumblr
  • Rob Johnson, VP of Product Strategy, Gnip
  • Hayes Davis, CEO, Union Metrics

Answering these questions:

  1. What social networks offer access to social data and how do they provide that access?
  2. What issues should you be aware of in order to maintain compliance with the Terms of Service from different providers?
  3. What are the technical challenges inherent in consuming, storing and analyzing large amounts of social data?
  4. While social data is often treated as the answer to all kinds of marketing and branding questions, it does have plenty of limitations. What are some useful business questions social data can answer?
  5. What tools and techniques are available to get started analyzing social data?

The art & science of social media movie marketing

Featuring these speakers:

Answering these questions:

  1. Why do fans share film-related content online?
  2. What are studios and networks doing to engage their audiences in and out of the theater?
  3. What marketing tactics work best to market a movie on Facebook? On Twitter?
  4. What social media metrics are the most important to measure during a film release?
  5. Can social media predict a film’s success at the box office?

On Tumblr: Case studies, best practices, analytics

Featuring these speakers:

Answering these questions:

  1. What are examples of successful brands on Tumblr?
  2. What are examples of clever Tumblr campaigns and strategies?
  3. How is the community on Tumblr different from Twitter and Facebook?
  4. What kind of content resonates on Tumblr?
  5. How can you measure a Tumblr campaign? What metrics matter?

Designing for sales

Featuring these speakers:

Answering these questions:

  1. How do you balance company and product information on your home page versus a clean, simple design to drive more conversions?
  2. By the time users make it to your Plans and Pricing page, they should have a basic understanding of your offering. What are some best practice examples of Plans & Pricing pages that convert?
  3. How can data and infographics be used to tell simple stories that encourage users to act?
  4. Are you ever done iterating? How do you avoid analysis paralysis and start implementing and testing quickly and continually?
  5. Everyone has an opinion and sales, marketing, and design all want to make sure their ideas are incorporated into the final product. What are some tips for avoiding design by committee?

Call Me SOA, maybe?

Featuring these speakers:

Answering these questions:

  1. Why do we care about service-oriented architectures? What are important concepts in a SOA?
  2. What are the advantages of using an SOA? What are the pitfalls?
  3. How do I know I need an SOA?
  4. How can we get started with SOA today?
  5. What are some awesome SOA technologies?

How Twitter has changed how we watch TV

Featuring this speaker:

Answering these questions:

  1. What is social television?
  2. How has Twitter changed how we watch TV?
  3. What are some examples of effective TV-related Twitter campaigns? What shows are doing the best (and the worst) on Twitter?
  4. What role do second screen apps play in TV viewing?
  5. What are some predictions for the future of Twitter and TV?

Written by admin

August 15th, 2012 at 10:49 am

Posted in News

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#NBCFail? More like #NBCWin! Final thoughts on NBC’s 2012 Olympic coverage

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According to Nielsen, 219.4 million viewers tuned into watch the Olympics on NBC this year. That’s roughly 70% of the US population. If you’re reading this, you were probably one of those 219 million people.

In the more than 50 million tweets posted about the Olympics from July 27 through August 12, some 92,226 tweets included the #NBCFail hashtag. These were posted by 53K different Twitter accounts, and included lots (and lots) of complaints and jokes about NBC’s tape delay, as well as some helpful workarounds for those who wanted to watch live. The first tweet we found that used the #NBCFail hashtag was this tweet from @marcslove posted on July 25, 2012 at 2:29 p.m. PDT (and not the tweet posted a day later from @stevenmarx as reported by certain other sources).

A few other good examples of the #NBCFail tweets are these from @JeremyCMorgan and @tmvogel.

On Twitter at least, people seemed to hate the tape delay, railing against it with their #NBCFail tweets. But the funny thing is, they still watched Olympic coverage on NBC. Did they ever.

A few days into the games, we were convinced that the tape delay was damaging fan participation and goodwill in the games, and NBC’s ratings would be down because of it. But it really didn’t seem to matter – NBC’s ratings were up and higher than ever. Maybe it’s because fans had no choice, and they really had to depend on NBC’s delayed coverage to see the events that mattered to them; live coverage was scarce and difficult to find. Or maybe it’s that noisy voices on Twitter simply don’t reflect larger public opinion. But, what it comes down to is the tape delay actually seems to have made more people watch…

Alan Wurtzel, President of Research and Media Development at NBCUniversal was surprised by the network’s performance, and discussed a few reasons why so many people tuned into NBC’s Olympic coverage. Specifically, he said that people who knew the results of an event “were actually more likely to watch the primetime broadcast”. If this is true, this helps explain why, in spite of a very vocal dislike of the tape delay and rampant spoilers, people still watched more Olympics than ever. If you read tweets and articles about how exciting a particular race or game was, maybe you are more likely to tune in to watch that game when it airs later. Twitter functioned like one giant commercial for NBC’s Olympic coverage.

NBC also credits some of their success to a huge increase in their digital strategy around these Olympics, including an emphasis on mobile and social media. Twitter, for example, definitely helped spread the word. More than 50 million tweets were posted by 11 million different people. Because of this, younger viewers watched more Olympics this year than ever before. NBC says both kids and teens showed double digit gains in viewers this year, which likely contributed heavily to the strong ratings. We know teens are active in social media.

So, was the tape delay really an #NBCFail? Technically, we’ll never really know, because we don’t know how NBC would have done had they aired everything live. But it certainly doesn’t look like a fail from here.

Written by Jenn D

August 14th, 2012 at 3:44 pm

Posted in Trends

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Olympic sponsors on Twitter – the final tally

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We’ve monitored and analyzed Twitter activity for the 11 official worldwide sponsors of the 2012 London Olympics for the duration of the games and have been posting summaries of their performance along the way. Now that the games are over, how did the sponsors stack up?

After leading the race for mentions on Twitter since we started tracking on July 27th, McDonald’s has run away with the gold with almost 35,000 tweets mentioning them. In the race for silver, Coca-Cola continued their lead over Team Visa from last week, accumulating over 20,000 mentions. Team Visa, with almost 19,000 mentions on Twitter since the games began, picked up the bronze.

Congratulations to the sponsors! Check out the results below. Click the image for the full-sized version.

Overall, the 11 official worldwide Olympic sponsors had more than 100,000 mentions on Twitter during the games. The most retweeted tweet mentioning an official sponsor was from gold medal winner McDonald’s at over 1,000 retweets:

The next most retweeted tweet mentioning a sponsor clocked in at 686 retweets and was from bronze medal winner Team Visa:

 

We hope you have enjoyed our analysis of tweets from the 2012 Olympic games! If you are interested in doing your own analysis of Olympics tweets, we’d be happy to help. Just let us know!

Written by Dean Cruse

August 14th, 2012 at 3:39 pm

Posted in Olympics,Trends

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2012 London Olympics in tweets

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For the past two weeks, we’ve been tracking – and analyzing – tweets about the 2012 Olympics. We’ve talked about sponsors and athletes and exciting match-ups. And now, here are a few final Twitter stats from the London Olympics.

From July 27, 2012 through August 12, 2012 – opening ceremony through closing ceremony – we tracked 50,643,268 Olympics-related tweets* from 11,070,485 contributors. That’s right, 50 million tweets in just over two weeks! The largest Twitter spike included 1.2 million tweets posted in a single hour on July 27 during the first hour of the Opening Ceremony.

The most buzzed about Olympic sport was football (soccer!) with 2.8 million tweets. The most buzzed about 2012 athlete was diver Tom Daley from Great Britain with 630 thousand tweets. And the most buzzed about country in this year’s games was the United States, which ended the Olympics with 104 medals and more than 5.4 million tweets.

The most retweeted tweet of the games was this one from @TeamGB that resulted in more than 64,000 retweets:

The most retweeted Twitter accounts overall were:

If you’re interested in analysis of any Olympics-related tweets, just let us know!

*Our tracking included full-fidelity coverage of any mentions of a few dozen keywords related to the Olympics, London 2012, and official Twitter handles and hashtags, posted between 2012-07-27 00:00 UTC and 2012-08-13 07:00 UTC. Let us know if you have any questions about our methodology.

Written by Jenn D

August 13th, 2012 at 5:20 pm

Posted in Olympics,Trends

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Did Twitter just predict Paul Ryan as Mitt Romney’s running mate?

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Update: Twitter was right. It’s a Romney-Ryan ticket.

It seems very likely that Mitt Romney is going to select Paul Ryan as his running mate for the Republican Presidential nomination. And it’s looking like Twitter predicted this. We hinted that we’d been tracking Republican VP Candidates with the screenshot accompanying the announcement of our new dashboard earlier this week. As you can clearly see from the updated dashboard below, Ryan started to pull away from the potential VP pack three days ago in terms of unique reach on Twitter. Of the pool of likely candidates, Ryan’s seen the greatest increase in reach over the past month, gaining a 65% increase in reach in the past 30 days. In addition, he’s seen the largest gains in both the number of total tweets and unique people talking about him recently.

So, did Twitter predict Romney’s decision correctly? Well, we’ll know soon enough, as Romney is expected to officially announce his vice presidential running mate tomorrow. We find Twitter’s potential to predict (or not) cultural and current events very interesting, so we’ll be following along and will post a more in-depth analysis next week, so more very soon.

 

 

Written by Hayes D

August 10th, 2012 at 11:10 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

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Olympic sponsors on Twitter – week 2 leaderboard

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Welcome to another installment in our coverage of the 2012 London Olympics on Twitter. Last week, we posted the Sponsor Leaderboard, looking at how the official sponsors of the games had performed on Twitter after week 1 of the games.

We started tracking mentions of the 11 worldwide Olympic sponsors’ official Twitter usernames when the Olympics began, and now after two weeks of tweeting, how are they stacking up?

McDonald’s continues to lead the pack with almost 29,000 tweets mentioning them since the games began. But, look out for Coca-Cola, who has come from behind this week to surpass Team Visa and grab the silver medal place for now. Also notable, Procter & Gamble, who moved from eighth to sixth place with a 240% increase in tweets and a 29% increase in followers over the past week.

With only a few more days of Olympic activity, who will win the gold for Olympic sponsor Twitter activity? Stay tuned to find out! And, if you are interested in doing your own analysis of Olympics tweets, we’d be happy to help. Just let us know!

Check out the results below. Click the image for the full-sized version.

Written by Dean Cruse

August 10th, 2012 at 12:12 pm

Posted in Olympics,Trends

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Twitter’s real-time response to the women’s Olympic soccer gold medal game

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By now, you’be probably seen some of our London 2012 Olympics Twitter coverage. Today, we tracked the gold medal women’s soccer match between the United States and Japan.

Just over a year ago, the US Women’s National Soccer Team lost to Japan in the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup, so this Olympic rematch promised to be very exciting. And it definitely delivered! With a record-setting 80,203 fans in the stadium, plus millions watching or listening around the world, the game was action-packed. USA scored the first goal of the game in the 8th minute of play, and the final score was 2-1, with the United States emerging victorious.

711,646 tweets were posted during the 2-hour soccer game from 433,797 different Twitter accounts. The most exciting moment during the game was at 19:55 UTC when Carli Lloyd scored the second US goal, which hit a peak of nearly 12K tweets per minute. At the end of the game, celebratory tweets about USA’s win skyrocketed up to around 22K tweets per minute.

261K tweets were posted about Team USA and 8K tweets were posted about Team Japan*. The most mentioned player on the US team was Hope Solo (with Carli Lloyd a close second) and the most mentioned player on the Japanese team was Shinobu Ohno. Click the image below for a full-sized version.

Interested in doing your own analysis of Olympics tweets? We can help! Contact us to talk more.

*It’s important to note that when the game was live in London (it started at 7:45 p.m. London time), it was very early in the morning in Japan and the middle of the day in the United States, so it’s likely that more US fans were watching than Japanese fans. 

Written by Jenn D

August 9th, 2012 at 3:09 pm

Posted in Olympics

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Announcing our new and improved TweetReach Pro dashboard

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We’re so excited to unveil our brand new TweetReach Pro dashboard!

The new dashboard allows you to quickly find overall stats for your account, compare metrics across Trackers, explore how your Trackers have been performing over the past 30 days, review recently run snapshot reports, and so much more. Plus, it looks better than ever…

A few things you can do with the new dashboard:

  • Surface Tracker stats for our four main metrics in the graph
  • Review Tracker stats for any day in the past month
  • Reorder your Trackers
  • Select and deselect Trackers to display in graph
  • Set up new Trackers
  • Drill into and edit existing Trackers
  • Explore recently-run snapshot reports
  • Run new snapshot reports
  • View overall account stats, including total all-time tweets analyzed and the number of active Trackers, snapshot reports and account users

There’s more detail about what you can do with your dashboard (and how to do it) on our helpdesk. And as always, please let us know if you have any questions.

Written by Jenn D

August 9th, 2012 at 2:37 pm

Posted in Help,News

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