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Thoughts on social media analytics from the makers of TweetReach

Archive for June, 2012

Tracking tweets at BlogWorld 2012

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The BlogWorld and New Media Expo 2012 was held earlier this month in New York and we were happy to have worked with the conference organizers to track the tweets during the event.

So what was Twitter buzzing about? During the conference from June 5 through June 7, the official #BWENY‬ hashtag was tweeted over 18,000 times by more than 4,600 people, generating a unique reach of over 6 million and almost 87 million impressions.

Like many of the conferences we track, each day saw a huge spike in tweets during the first hour of conference (around 9 a.m.) each day, a big drop during lunch hour, and an increase in activity around 2 p.m. There was low Twitter activity during the evening parties as attendees took their discussion offline and continued networking in person.

The five most retweeted tweets were by: @griner, @jaybaer, @thebloggess, @juliaroy, and @webseriestoday, and those tweets combined generated 676,388 impressions.

The tweet with the highest exposure came from Ted Rubin:

And, overall, the most active contributors to the Twitter backchannel were:

At the end of day two of the conference, Blog World founders Rick Calvert and Dave Cynkin announced that going forward, the conference would be renamed New Media Expo (NMX). They described the change to better reflect the changing industry and the broader community of bloggers, podcasters, and Web TV producers.

What do you think? We’re excited to see how the event evolves!

Written by Dean Cruse

June 21st, 2012 at 10:33 am

Posted in Events

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What is TweetReach?

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Here’s a quick video explaining what TweetReach is and how it can help you measure your – or your campaign’s – impact on Twitter.

Still have questions? Just ask!

Written by Jenn D

June 18th, 2012 at 6:31 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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Today’s TweetReach Tip: When tweets are available for analysis

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One of the questions we’re often asked is when tweets are available for analysis (and how long they’re accessible). We hear a lot of questions like:

  • Can I get tweets from last month? What about last year?
  • I have an event coming up – what’s the best way to measure those tweets?
  • What if I want to analyze only tweets from the past two days?
  • Can I track tweets for a month or longer?

So, here’s our answer to those questions. We have several different ways at TweetReach to access tweets, depending on when they were posted and how many tweets there are. First, we just need to know the answer to one question: when were your tweets posted? 

My tweets will be posted in the future

If your tweets will be posted anytime in the future, then we have the most flexibility for reporting. Anytime you can plan ahead for your Twitter tracking, it will be both easier and cheaper to get the tweet analytics you need. If your tweets will be posted in the future, whether it’s later today or not until next month, we have two ways to measure those tweets:

  1. Set up a Tracker before tweets are posted
  2. Run a snapshot report after tweets are posted

TweetReach Tracker will capture all tweets in real time, as they are posted to Twitter. So this means you need to set it up before tweets start going out. Trackers are perfect for longer or higher-volume campaigns, as well as for more in-depth metrics. Trackers don’t have any tweet or time limits*, so they can track as many tweets as you want, for as long as you want. We have some customers who have been tracking – and archiving – their tweets for two years! Trackers are available through TweetReach Pro.

The other option is to run a snapshot report after your event or campaign is over and all relevant tweets have been posted. A snapshot report will include basic Twitter analytics for up to 1,500 tweets from the past 7-10 days (whichever comes first). Snapshot reports are great for smaller, lower-volume, or shorter campaigns. You can run a snapshot report anytime at tweetreach.com. The first 50 tweets are free, and the full snapshot is $20.

So, set up a Tracker before your event if you’re expecting more than 1,500 tweets or want to track them for more than a week. Run a snapshot report after your event if you’re expecting fewer than 1,500 tweets over a week or less.

My tweets were posted in the past week

If the time period for your tweets is within the past few daysrun a one-time snapshot report. A snapshot TweetReach report will include up to 1,500 tweets from the past 7-10 days. This varies a little from query to query, but most are around a week. You can also limit these snapshots to specific dates from the past week using date filters. A snapshot including up to 50 tweets is free, and a full snapshot will be $20.

My tweets were posted more than a week ago

If the tweets were posted within the past month, then we can access those tweets through a custom TweetReach historical report. This works best for a single day or few day period from the past month, but can include tweets for up to 30 days back from today. These historical reports range in price, depending on the length of time and number of tweets being analyzed, but start at $200, and include full coverage of all tweets from your time period.

Contact us to discuss your specific needs and we can give you a precise quote. TweetReach Back is really best for Twitter analytics emergencies – when a client or coworker absolutely needs numbers and didn’t remember to tell you until now.

*Our lower-level TweetReach Pro plans have some soft tweet limits, but most people will never reach those limits. Please check with us if you want to know about these limits or if you plan on tracking a high-volume event.

Written by Jenn D

June 13th, 2012 at 11:47 am

Posted in Help

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Using TweetReach to determine the reach of a tweet

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You already know TweetReach reports are great for measuring the reach of hashtags and Twitter accounts, but how about an individual tweet? What if you want to analyze the reach of a tweet (and any retweets of or replies to that tweet)? Our reports can do that, too! In fact, that’s where our name comes from and one of the original problems we set out to solve more than three years ago. Tweet. Reach. TweetReach.

There are a few options for measuring the reach of a tweet. You can paste the entire text of the tweet into the search box. Since Twitter works best with shorter search queries that’s ideal if you have a shorter tweet. And if you have a longer tweet, you can select a few unique words or a phrase from the tweet to search for.

Let’s try it with this tweet from @Disney.

Since this is a pretty short tweet, we can search for the full tweet text (minus the URL to keep it simple): disney #DisneyFact: An estimated one million bubbles were drawn in the making of The Little Mermaid. We also included the original Twitter handle, minus the @ sign, to be sure we’re catching all attributed retweets of the original tweet. Here’s the TweetReach report for this query:

This report includes 108 total tweets, which includes the original tweet. So that’s 107 retweets. However, you can see that the original tweet only has 73 actual retweets, according to the Most Retweeted Tweets section. What’s going on?

This is where it gets a little messy. Some people will retweet a tweet with Twitter’s official RT button (we call this a new-style or automated retweet). Some will copy and paste the tweet and add “RT @username” to retweet (old-style or manual retweet). Some will modify the original tweet by adding their own commentary or abbreviating the text (modified retweet or MT). Some will simply quote the tweet without adding any RT language (quoted RT). Twitter typically only associates that first type (new-style RTs) with an original tweet to count them as retweets.

But in a TweetReach report, if a tweet starts with “RT @username”, regardless of how that retweet was generated (new-style or old-style), it will count as an official retweet. But if there’s anything in front of that retweet, such as commentary or other characters, then it will not count as a retweet, but it will show up in a report for that tweet. So that’s why the above report only shows 73 actual retweets of the original tweet, but there are 108 total tweets in the report. One of those tweets is the original tweet, 73 are official retweets, and the 34 remaining tweets are modified or quoted retweets. So the full reach of this @Disney Little Mermaid tweet and all its various retweets is 1,322,791.

A few more examples:

Search for: SFGiants amazing pic bradmangin melky cabrera 7th inning

Search for: wired “Hot New Characters Will Invigorate Game of Thrones”

Search for: tweetreachapp measure share of voice on twitter four steps

Tips for measuring the reach of a tweet:

  • Keep search queries short
  • Include handles without the @ sign
  • Put exact phrases in quotation marks
  • Select unique words for your query
  • Leave out URLs to keep it simple

And that’s how you can use a TweetReach report to analyze the reach of a tweet. Try it for yourself! And if you’re wondering what else you can search for, check our helpdesk or ask us.

PS – Have you ever tried our TweetReach Labs Retweet Rings tool? It’s a fun, animated visualizer to see how retweets spread.

Written by Jenn D

June 5th, 2012 at 12:31 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

Tagged with , , , ,

16 ways to use Twitter to improve your next conference

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Twitter is the perfect social channel for conferences. It provides a real-time, public and searchable record of tweets about a conference that organizers, speakers and attendees can follow. Twitter even allows people who can’t attend in person to read along as conference events unfold. And Twitter gives conference planners an archive of participant comments, as well as measurable data they can report back to sponsors.

If you’re a conference organizer or producer, here are a few things you can do to make sure you’re getting the most out of Twitter during your next event.

Using an official conference hashtag

  1. Select a unique official hashtag. Make sure no other events are using this hashtag and that it’s separate from general topical conversation. Keep it short and easy to remember. A good conference hashtag will include the conference name or abbreviation, and sometimes the year or location. If you can, avoid using underscores or other punctuation in your hashtag to keep it simple (and to be sure the hashtag works in every Twitter client). Some we like include #BWENY (BlogWorld Expo) and #ica12 (International Communication Association).
  2. Communicate the official hashtag. Try to make the official hashtag easy to find. Post the official conference hashtag on presentation slides, as well as signs and posters around the conference venue, list it on the conference website, and use it in official tweets from your own and other organizers’ Twitter accounts. Encourage speakers and sponsors to use the hashtag.
  3. Track mentions of the official and unofficial hashtags. In addition to the main official hashtag, attendees may adopt track- or interest group-specific hashtags or mistakenly use an incorrect hashtag. Try to keep track of all relevant hashtags, even if they’re not officially endorsed.

Surfacing interesting conference topics

  1. Follow conversation as it unfolds. Keep track of attendee tweets about the conference, both to monitor conversation during the event, as well to create an archive for future access. It’s very simple to follow the use of a hashtag in real time with any number of Twitter clients and applications, so pick your favorite. If you want to share these tweets, consider displaying them live on a monitor at the conference or on the conference website.
  2. Pay attention to retweets. Use retweet counts to keep track of which tweets are getting the most traction on Twitter. What speakers, presentations, or topics are being retweeted? You can use this information to make your next conference even better.
  3. Use official handle to ask questions. Twitter is great for real-time interactions, so use the official conference account to ask attendees how things are going. Get live feedback on presentations, the venue, conference logistics and more.
  4. Find problems quickly. Monitor conversation about the conference throughout to detect problems. Is the wifi not working? Are participants unable to find certain rooms? If something is going wrong and you’re actively monitoring conference tweets, you can fix small problems before they become big problems.

Sharing important conference content

  1. Use official handle to post announcements and schedule changes. Give participants a central and reliable channel on Twitter where they can access important conference information. If there are any important announcements or changes to the conference schedule, post them to the official Twitter account so attendees can find and share them.
  2. Distribute speaker slides. Use Twitter to make it easy for attendees to find speakers’ presentation slides. Encourage speakers to share their slides through their own Twitter accounts, and retweet those slides from the official account. Also share links back to the conference website where participants can access and download conference slides and other documents.
  3. Answer attendee questions. Throughout the conference, use Twitter to answer audience questions, direct attendees to the appropriate resources and make sure everyone is getting the most out of the event.

Tracking audience engagement

  1. Measure total Twitter audience size. With the spread of conference content on social media like Twitter, the size of the audience can grow well beyond the number of attendees physically present. Measure the total reach and exposure for conference tweets, as well as the number of total tweets and unique contributors.
  2. Determine popular speakers and presentations. Analyze conference Twitter engagement by tracking metrics like retweets, replies, favorites and impressions to learn which topics are generating buzz. Search for speaker and panel names, presentation topics and track titles to see which ones are most talked about. Find out which images are being shared the most to determine attendees’ favorite moments, and track shared URLs to see which websites and pages have been most useful to participants.
  3. Share metrics with sponsors. Report this information back to conference sponsors to demonstrate the value of their sponsorship. Showing sponsors how many more people their brands reached beyond in-person conference attendance can be very valuable to securing future sponsorships. When possible, share specific examples of effective tweets about or from conference sponsors.

Gathering feedback for your next conference

  1. Tweet links to conference feedback survey. In addition to sending a post-conference email asking attendees for feedback, also post a link to the feedback survey on the official Twitter account. Some attendees may be more likely to respond on Twitter, so this gives them another opportunity to respond.
  2. Compare this conference to other events. How did this conference compare to recent or related conferences? If you have Twitter metrics for previous years’ conferences or other similar conferences in your industry, use them to see how this year’s event measured up. Look specifically for changes in engagement and participation, as well as reach and exposure. If this event’s metrics were lower, try to figure out why and how you can improve next time. If they were higher, that’s great, but try to learn more about why your numbers were up.
  3. Analyze qualitative tweet content. In addition to quantitative audience and engagement metrics, tweets are a great source of qualitative data about the conference. Read through a tweet transcript after the event is over to see what attendees liked and didn’t like. Mine this transcript for any feedback you can use to improve for next time. In some cases, an in-depth content or sentiment analysis might be useful.

Photo credit: Scott Beale/Laughing Squid at laughingsquid.com

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Interested in learning more about TweetReach? Take a look at our website or contact our sales team for more.

Written by Jenn D

June 4th, 2012 at 3:56 pm

Posted in Guides

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