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This Week in Social Analytics #26

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Welcome back to This Week in Social Analytics, our ongoing summary of some of our favorite posts from the past week in the world of measurement, analytics and social media. Enjoy!

How to create social media metrics that matter
Over at Mark Schaefer’s {grow} blog, Steve Goldner provides some concrete examples of how to obtain and retain social media commitment from clients.

Making Business Decisions Through Data
David Armano and Chuck Hemann co-wrote this piece that presents two different models for decision making based on listening to online conversations in real-time and acting on insights gathered from the data.

Social Media Metrics that Matter and Outcomes Analysis
Keith Burtis encourages marketers to stop worrying about aggregate data that don’t affect results. Focus instead on metrics that matter — those that drive conversions that are important to your business.

How to Measure Social Media ROI Like the Experts
Corey Eridon at Hubspot gives several tips on how to measure social media success, from initial visit to conversion across all of your social networks.

The Most Powerful Social Media Measurement Tool Money Can Buy
Amber Naslund suggests that despite all of the wonderful social media measurement tools out there, the best way to analyze your metrics is to use good old human-powered critical thinking. Use the best tool for the job, but use your brain to gain insights from the data.

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Written by Dean Cruse

December 2nd, 2011 at 10:25 am

One Response to 'This Week in Social Analytics #26'

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  1. Thanks for including here with a great bunch of articles.

    keith burtis

    2 Dec 11 at 12:32 pm

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