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Measuring participant influence through amplification on Twitter

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We recently upgraded the contributor metrics available in our TweetReach Pro Trackers. Among other metrics we’re now surfacing are new contributor amplification measures, including amplified impressions and an amplification multiplier.

Our objective with these new contributor metrics is to help you find people who are driving conversation and engagement around your campaign or brand. Because, depending on your goals, there probably isn’t one single influence metric that completely captures the contributions of your most important, active participants. So we present you with several contributor metrics:

  • Tweets
  • Direct Impressions
  • Retweets
  • Retweet Rate
  • Total Exposure
  • Amplification Multiplier

RT rate is the average number of retweets per tweet a contributor has posted. This metric is useful for finding people who have contributed to the spread of a message and who have engaged followers. Look at this number in relation to the total number of tweets this contributor has posted.

The amplification multiplier represents the spread of a tweet through retweets. If the original tweet generated 100 direct impressions, and retweets generated 150 additional impressions, then that tweet generated 250 total impressions, resulting in an amplification multiplier of 1.5x the original tweet. For each contributor, this number is calculated as an average for all their tweets in this Tracker. If a participant did not receive any retweets, then that person will not have an amplification multiplier, since her tweets were not amplified. Generally, anyone with an amplification multiplier of 1.2x or higher is doing quite well at spreading conversation. And sometimes you’ll see someone with a huge amplification multiplier – 100x or more. Generally, this person did not generate many direct impressions, but was retweeted by someone with a large following. If a number looks like an outlier, it probably is, so check that person’s other metrics to see what’s causing this spike.

To find influential people in your Tracker, take a look at all of these contributor metrics. Use tweets to find your most active advocates. Use direct impressions to find people with a lot of followers. Use RT rate to find people with an active, engaged following. Use the amplification multiplier to find people with a large secondary audience. Together, you should be able to develop a list of engaged, influential and passionate advocates for your campaign or brand.

You can also drill in to view an individual contributor’s details by clicking on their username anywhere in your Tracker. On the contributor detail page, you’ll find all kinds of information about that Twitter user, as seen here:


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Written by Jenn D

November 28th, 2011 at 12:30 pm

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