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Archive for November, 2011

Measuring participant influence through amplification on Twitter

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We recently upgraded the contributor metrics available in our TweetReach Pro Trackers. Among other metrics we’re now surfacing are new contributor amplification measures, including amplified impressions and an amplification multiplier.

Our objective with these new contributor metrics is to help you find people who are driving conversation and engagement around your campaign or brand. Because, depending on your goals, there probably isn’t one single influence metric that completely captures the contributions of your most important, active participants. So we present you with several contributor metrics:

  • Tweets
  • Direct Impressions
  • Retweets
  • Retweet Rate
  • Total Exposure
  • Amplification Multiplier

RT rate is the average number of retweets per tweet a contributor has posted. This metric is useful for finding people who have contributed to the spread of a message and who have engaged followers. Look at this number in relation to the total number of tweets this contributor has posted.

The amplification multiplier represents the spread of a tweet through retweets. If the original tweet generated 100 direct impressions, and retweets generated 150 additional impressions, then that tweet generated 250 total impressions, resulting in an amplification multiplier of 1.5x the original tweet. For each contributor, this number is calculated as an average for all their tweets in this Tracker. If a participant did not receive any retweets, then that person will not have an amplification multiplier, since her tweets were not amplified. Generally, anyone with an amplification multiplier of 1.2x or higher is doing quite well at spreading conversation. And sometimes you’ll see someone with a huge amplification multiplier – 100x or more. Generally, this person did not generate many direct impressions, but was retweeted by someone with a large following. If a number looks like an outlier, it probably is, so check that person’s other metrics to see what’s causing this spike.

To find influential people in your Tracker, take a look at all of these contributor metrics. Use tweets to find your most active advocates. Use direct impressions to find people with a lot of followers. Use RT rate to find people with an active, engaged following. Use the amplification multiplier to find people with a large secondary audience. Together, you should be able to develop a list of engaged, influential and passionate advocates for your campaign or brand.

You can also drill in to view an individual contributor’s details by clicking on their username anywhere in your Tracker. On the contributor detail page, you’ll find all kinds of information about that Twitter user, as seen here:


Written by Jenn D

November 28th, 2011 at 12:30 pm

TweetReach Thanksgiving support hours

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The TweetReach support team will be around to answer all of your questions throughout the Thanksgiving holiday. However, please allow us a little extra time to return your calls and emails on Thursday, November 24 and Friday, November 25, as we’re likely to be stuffing our faces with turkey and cranberry sauce (or sleeping off our resulting tryptophan comas).

During this time, we will return all urgent requests as soon as possible and non-urgent requests within 24 hours. As always, you can get in touch with us in many ways, but email is the best way to reach us over the holiday (aren’t smartphones great?).

Happy Thanksgiving!

Written by Jenn D

November 23rd, 2011 at 2:41 pm

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This Week in Social Analytics #25

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Hello again from This Week in Social Analytics, our ongoing summary of some of our favorite posts from the week in the world of measurement, analytics and social media. Enjoy!

Flipping the Funnel: The Four Levels of Influence
Tom Webster suggests that marketers have it backwards by focusing on influencers. Instead, perhaps we should pay more attention to the influenced and on creating brand advocates.

Number of Fans and Followers is NOT a Business Metric – What You Do With Them Is
Jeremiah Owyang reminds us that vanity metrics don’t matter — business that comes from fans and followers are what is important.

Top 10 Takeaways from #ACCELERATE
Last week, a great group of #measure pros met at Web Analytics Demystified’s #ACCELERATE conference in San Francisco. In this post, Michele Hinojosa lays out her top 10 takeaways from the event.

Analysts, and executives, and monkeys. Oh My!
Lee Isensee summarizes some of his thoughts from the #ACCELERATE conference as well as the recent eMetrics conference and warns that analysts must not become isolated as “web analysts” and move beyond just analyzing data and building reports.

Gilligan Meets Super #ACCELERATE — Recreated
And in another #ACCELERATE wrap up post, check out Tim Wilson’s awesome presentation, and yes, it’s in rhyme.

Written by Dean Cruse

November 21st, 2011 at 9:38 am

This Week in Social Analytics #24

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Welcome back to This Week in Social Analytics, our ongoing summary of some of our favorite posts from the past week in the world of measurement, analytics and social media. Enjoy!

Half of all social media campaigns go unnoticed, says new report
Jon Russell of The Next Web discusses data from a new Digital Life 2012 report by TNS that suggests that as many as half of all companies running social media marketing campaigns are seeing their messages ignored.

Social Media and the Sampling Problem
Gary Angel of Semphonic is skeptical of the validity of brand-tracking and sentiment analysis with social media due to poorly controlled sampling. He also discusses Elea Feit‘s work on brand word-of-mouth and sentiment at the Wharton Customer Analytics Initiative and warns analysts to beware of trusting sentiment analysis from social media.

Social Media Analytics: Three lessons for success
Ted Sapountzis of SAP summarizes his presentation at Business Insider’s recent Social Media Analytics conference, including measurement tips he has picked up from his work at SAP and through conversations with peers.

The One Social Media Metric You Need
Heidi Cohen asked several social media marketers and analysts to describe the most important element of their measurement strategy and summarized the results in this post. Some great ideas from Perry Drake, Rebecca Lieb, Brian Massey, Jim Sterne, and others.

How to create social media metrics that matter
On Mark Schaefer’s {grow} blog, Steve Goldner provides some tips for social marketers to help them develop their plan and provide meaningful metrics to their businesses.

Written by Dean Cruse

November 11th, 2011 at 1:59 pm

TakeFive with TweetReach – Michele Hinojosa

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Welcome back to TakeFive with TweetReach, our ongoing interview series with notable members of the social media analytics and measurement community. This week we’re thrilled to welcome Michele Hinojosa, a self-confessed analytics geek and Director of Digital Analytics at Red Door Interactive.

TweetReach: Welcome Michele! Let’s start with talking about how you got started with social analytics. What got you interested in measuring social?

Michele Hinojosa: I first got into digital measurement through web and advertising analytics at Kelley Blue Book. As I started expanding my horizons and wanting to learn more about the digital analytics industry, I started joining in conversations in social media — the Yahoo Web Analytics group, Linked In, Quora, but especially Twitter. For me, social analytics started mostly as a curiosity, just playing around with different solutions and analysing social traffic to my little blog, or analysing the social media behaviour of the online web analytics community through the #measure hashtag.

Now, at Red Door Interactive, my team of Digital Analysts and I get to help clients understand the impact of conversations they’re having with customers, including on the website, in social media or through a variety of acquisition channels.

TweetReach: What metrics are most important for your job and your company? What should we be measuring? Beyond that, is there anything we shouldn’t be measuring? Are there any “bad” metrics?

Michele Hinojosa: I don’t think there are “bad” metrics per se, just less useful ones. There is an evolution as companies grow from a simple like/follower approach to looking more at business impact. This isn’t really surprising, given a lot of companies also embark on social “because we should”, but without strategy or goals for doing so. Ideally, companies should embark on social initiatives with clear goals (e.g., decrease call center volume, drive sales, drive traffic to the website, save on other marketing budgets, etc) and understand what, in a perfect world, you would want to measure. From there, figure out if you can. Do you have the right toolsets? The necessary data integration? If not, come up with something that gets you close, or gives you directional insight while you build out the rest. I’m not saying wait until everything is perfect before you do anything, but make sure you know where you want to get before you start working towards it.

TweetReach: What are your recommendations for someone just getting started with social analytics? What should they do first? What are some important considerations?

Michele Hinojosa: For an analyst thinking about diving into social media, they need to first get involved in social media themselves. I don’t think you can measure what you don’t understand, and getting involved in a variety of social channels is key to understanding them. (And no, just having a Facebook account doesn’t count.) Each channel is different and the goals of being involved are different. I try new social channels all the time. They may prove to not be “my kind of thing” (and no one can possibly keep up with all of them and hold down a job, too!) but at least play around and see what they offer, how the channels differ and how they might be used for different goals or different businesses.

There are key books I would recommend reading – John Lovett’s “Social Media Metrics Secrets”, Jim Sterne’s “Social Media Metrics” and Olivier Blanchard’s “Social Media ROI” (and converse with these guys on Twitter! They are great guys and are always up for a good conversation.) Not to mention a myriad of blogs out there.

From there, start doing it, even if you just start by analysing your own accounts. Better yet, find a local business or non-profit to help (so you can attempt to tie to actual business metrics.) You’ll learn more from doing (and, let’s be honest, making mistakes) than you ever will from a book.

But it’s important to keep in mind social media is just one marketing channel. It’s great to have an interest in social analytics, but like other areas, it needs to be kept in context of the overall business and marketing efforts.

TweetReach: Let’s talk about consistency in measurement. There are a tremendous number of tools and approaches used to measure social media performance, which can produce results that are difficult to compare. Do you see the industry evolving towards a more standardized set of metrics or do you think we’ll continue to see a lot of variety and experimentation?

Michele Hinojosa: I’m going to give the very on-the-fence answer: Both. While social analytics often starts as just “likes” and “followers” for companies, pretty soon executives (and hopefully, good analysts!) are trying to tie this to actual business value, and look at social media in the context of other marketing initiatives. Profit or revenue driven are standardised and can apply across all channels, including social. However, let’s be honest: sometimes that’s hard to measure! It involves tying together different data sources, understanding attribution, and trying to measure what may sometimes be unmeasurable. (Do I know that you bought my product after you saw your best friend’s Facebook post raving about it? Maybe not.) But while the answers won’t be perfect, companies have to try to get as close as they can.

On the other hand, new social channels crop up every day, and while these too need to be tied to profit, they’ll also have their own in-network metrics that marketers and analysts will keep track of, and use to understand behaviour. (After all, somewhere there’s a 12-year-old in his garage creating something that will blow Zuckerberg off the map.)

Ultimately, social needs to be tied to business objectives like any other initiative, but the methods we use to do this will get more sophisticated, and I think there’s a lot more experimentation still to come.

TweetReach: We’re hearing a lot about influence right now; everyone wants to measure influence and target influencers. What are your thoughts on measuring influence in social media? What’s the best way to determine who is influential for a particular campaign or initiative?

Michele Hinojosa: Influence is a great example of where social analytics has room to grow. What businesses care about is who influences sales (or leads, or referrals, or whatever your business objectives.) Social tools are measuring “influence” on retweets, or Facebook likes, or video views. I can understand why businesses want to understand who their influencers are, but I think we need to keep in mind the limitations of a lot of current measures of influence — they’re likely not measuring influencers of the business metric they actually care about. That’s when it will be truly useful.

At the same time, I worry about the uses that current influence metrics are put to. I can see a use in using influence to prioritise, for example, response to requests. (For the same reason that food critics get the best cut of meat, those with online influence can have a big impact if they have a negative experience, and I can understand companies wanting to provide excellent service.) But I hope it’s not used as a metric of “you’re not worthy of my time.” Simply put, I can see using influence to determine who to respond to first, but not who to respond to at all.

I also worry about the use of influence in areas such as recruiting. I hope companies make their decisions off more than one number, and look at a candidate or potential consultant’s actual track record, results and skills.

I think these concerns just speak to the overall reality with a lot of social media metrics today — they can be useful in context, but as one standalone metric, we may sometimes attach too much significance, without enough consideration, analysis and scrutiny.

TweetReach: Thanks, Michele!

Michele Hinojosa is a self-confessed analytics geek. She is currently the Director of Digital Analytics at Red Door Interactive, responsible for leading a team of analysts to produce actionable insights and recommendations to optimize clients’ online initiatives. As the Manager of Web Analytics for Kelley Blue Book, she and her team were responsible for forecasting, analyzing, testing and optimizing KBB.com and its associated businesses.

Michele holds degrees in Law and Psychology from the University of Melbourne (Australia) but is currently located in Southern California. As a certified group fitness instructor, she is as fanatical about Les Mills group fitness programs and cycling as she is about data.

Michele enjoys reading, writing and thinking about analytics and engaging with the web analytics community via Twitter. You can read her thoughts at michelehinojosa.com or @michelehinojosa.

Written by Dean Cruse

November 9th, 2011 at 12:49 pm

This Week in Social Analytics #23

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Hello again from This Week in Social Analytics, our ongoing summary of some of our favorite posts from the week in the world of measurement, analytics and social media. Enjoy!

How brands can turn the art of social media scientific
As she works with sports teams, leagues, athletes and corporate brands, Amy Martin of Digital Royalty combines what she calls cold (traditional) metrics and warm (social) metrics to track a measure of return on influence and discusses the direct correlation between it and revenue.

SEO Beats PPC & Social Media For Generating Leads
In a recent study of 500 U.S. online marketers by Webmarketing123, SEO is the number one source of leads for both B2C and B2B marketers, beating out both PPC and social media marketing. A handy infographic of the results can also be found here.

Stop the Social Puppetry for Klout and Other Influence Metrics!
In this widely retweeted post, Pam Moore discusses the recent changes to Klout’s algorithm for scoring online influence and argues that any measure of social influence should be viewed as just one of the numbers in the bag of measurement tools and metrics.

Written by Dean Cruse

November 5th, 2011 at 9:00 am

New contributor reporting in TweetReach Trackers

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We’ve upgraded our TweetReach Trackers to include a new way to find out even more about who is tweeting about your campaign, your client or your company. Ever wanted to know who’s creating the most popular content and driving the most engagement in the conversations about your campaign? Our new Tracker contributor reporting can help you identify those key contributors – the influencers, the people driving the most retweets, the highest exposure and the widest amplification, your biggest fans and advocates.

In addition to traditional metrics like number of tweets and impressions generated by each contributor, we’ve added a bunch of new metrics about each contributor. Our new contributor metrics include:

  • Retweets: The number of times a contributor’s tweets were retweeted
  • RT Rate: The average number of retweets per tweet a contributor has received
  • Total Exposure: The total number of impressions generated by a contributor, including direct impressions from the contributor’s own tweets, as well as amplified impressions resulting from retweets and replies
  • Amplification Multiplier: A contributor’s rate of amplification, based on how far that contributor’s tweets spread due to the impressions generated by retweets and replies

You can also drill into any contributor to see detailed metrics for that person. Just click on any username to see that contributor’s details.

TweetReach Trackers provide ongoing, real-time Twitter analysis and are available through a TweetReach Pro subscription.

A word to the analytics geeks

The word amplification has been used in a lot of contexts by many very smart people as an important social media metric, most recently by Avinash Kaushik in his post about the best social media metrics. We should note here that what we refer to as retweet rate is roughly the same as what Avinash calls amplification. We obviously believe this is a very important measure or we wouldn’t have included it. However, we think it doesn’t accurately describe the extent to which a contributor’s message is amplified. To do that, one needs to consider the overall increase in audience as a result of the retweets. This is how our amplification multiplier metric works. We look at growth between the impressions generated by the original tweet and the total impressions generated by the original tweet and any RTs or replies to that tweet. We express this as a “multiplier” so that it neatly describes how many times larger the total exposure was vs the original exposure.

Written by Jenn D

November 3rd, 2011 at 7:39 pm