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Thoughts on social media analytics from the makers of TweetReach

Archive for May, 2011

The final episode of The Oprah Show in tweets, both sad and sarcastic

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Yesterday, we tracked 253,321 tweets from 160,458 Twitterers about Oprah Winfrey’s final episode of The Oprah Show. The tweets have been pouring in all week. We, along with Resource Interactive, have monitored more than 600,000 tweets about Oprah and her show this week alone. Dozens of celebrities tweeted their congratulations and opinions on Oprah’s last show, including @TheEllenShow, @ricky_martin, @MariahCarey, @RevRunWisdom, @aplusk, @DENISE_RICHARDS, @Alyssa_Milano, @michaelianblack, @kevin_nealon, @kathygriffin, and @AnnCurry.

The Oprah Show aired for most markets at 4:00 p.m. local time. During the 4:00 p.m. hour in EDT, tweets spiked up to 2,500 tweets per minute during the final moments of the show. That’s a sizable spike, but compared to the 2011 Academy Awards (11,780 tpm) or even the Chrysler ‘Imported From Detroit’ Super Bowl commercial (2,816 tpm), it’s not even close to the highest spike we’ve seen for a television event (of course The Oprah Show wasn’t aired live in all markets at the same time, so these aren’t completely equal comparisons).

A few more tidbits from the data:

  • 4,511 tweets including references to tears
  • 8,001 tweets mentioned crying
  • 5,183 tweets referred to feeling sad
  • 12 tweets used the phrase “my life is over”

But not everyone was unhappy to see the show end. Many of the most-retweeted tweets were sarcastic remarks or jokes about The Oprah Show. For example, these tweets from @funnyordie (via @robhuebel) and @DamonLindelof received 1,068 and 677 retweets, respectively.

Oprah’s main demographic is women over 35, which isn’t really Twitter’s main demographic. So some of the most popular tweets about Oprah yesterday, like the two above, had nothing to do with the content of the show. But other popular tweets were quotes from the show itself, like these:

Oprah gave out her personal email address – oprah@oprah.com – on air and 1,179 people tweeted about it. She’s probably going to get a lot of emails. Good thing she has the time to read all those now. Just don’t accidentally email Opera.

Written by Jenn D

May 26th, 2011 at 3:39 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

Tagged with , ,

Full TweetReach reports now in PDF and CSV

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Our full TweetReach reports are now delivered in CSV format, as well as PDF! This gives you more flexibility with your data, allowing you to create your own graphs in Excel, quickly sort and search within your tweets, and more. Still only $20, full TweetReach reports are perfect for analysis of recent Twitter activity about a term and baseline account measurement.

More about TweetReach Reports

If you’ve never run a TweetReach report, here’s some more information about what they are and how they work. We offer two types of one-time snapshot reports: a free quick report and a paid full report.

The quick snapshot report is a fast and free way to review the last 50 tweets about a search term. The quick report is free of charge, runs in just a few seconds, and anyone can run a quick report by going to http://tweetreach.com and entering a search term. The quick report provides data on the 50 most recent tweets about your topic, including:

  • Reach
  • Total exposure (impressions)
  • Unique contributors and impressions generated
  • Tweet, RT, reply count
  • Full text of included tweets

The full snapshot report goes back as far as Twitter’s search API allows us to go. To purchase a full report, first run a quick report. If your search term generates more than 50 tweets, you’ll see a link where you can buy the full report. The full report provides the same metrics as a quick report, but includes as many tweets as we can get from Twitter (up to 1500 tweets from the past four days). A full report costs $20 and includes:

  • Reach
  • Total exposure (impressions)
  • Unique contributors and impressions generated
  • Tweet, RT, reply count
  • Full text of included tweets
  • PDF and CSV formats
  • Shareable URL

Written by Jenn D

May 9th, 2011 at 1:50 pm

Posted in News

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Track up to 10 queries in one Tracker

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We’ve been working hard to improve the TweetReach Pro infrastructure behind the scenes so that our tools are faster and smarter than ever. As part of that, we’re excited to announce that you can now track up to 10 search queries in a single TweetReach Tracker! This makes it even easier to find exactly the tweets you’re looking for.

A Tracker can monitor unlimited tweets for unlimited time about a campaign or topic. Each Tracker can include up to 10 search queries and exclude up to 5 terms. Unlike other services that charge per keyword, the TweetReach Tracker allows you to comprehensively search for all tweets that are part of a campaign, with multiple queries and keywords for each campaign.

If you’d like to try the Tracker for yourself, our TweetReach Pro pricing is listed here. And if you’re already a TweetReach Pro user, check out these detailed Tracker setup instructions and get more information about what you can search for in a Tracker.

Written by Jenn D

May 7th, 2011 at 6:20 pm

Posted in Features,News

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