TweetReach Blog

5 ways universities interact with their students on social media

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In the fall of 2012 Yale University started using our Union Metrics for Tumblr analytics to get smarter about how they were using the social blogging platform to share information and relate to their students. Since then, many more colleges and universities have created accounts on various social platforms in order to stay connected with their students in the places those students already spend their time. Here are a few examples of what universities are doing to reach students across social media.

1. On Tumblr: Share information with targeted groups

Tumblr’s unique position as a blogging platform with a built-in social element works especially well for universities wanting to target different groups of current or potential students. The tagging system means different types of posts can easily find their way to their respective communities across the site, and some universities even carve out separate Tumblrs for different areas of their university and resources. For example, the University of Texas at Austin has one Tumblr for their School of Architecture, one for the Blanton Museum, another for the Harry Ransom Center, and one more for the LBJ Library. That gives diehard Longhorns the chance to keep track of all resources UT offers, while those only interested in what the Blanton has to offer can narrow their focus.

MIT, on the other hand, chooses to focus their approach to just Residential Life & Dining on Tumblr, giving incoming students a chance to learn about their options before they arrive on campus, taking a lot of the stress out of a big life change.

The bottom line? Tumblr is the best way for universities to reach specific communities. (A full list of all the universities with a presence on Tumblr can be found here for those interested.)

2. On Instagram: Capture attention with compelling images

Many universities have a presence across platforms, and they play to each platform’s strengths. Yale, for example, uses Instagram to show off campus and the school’s history, beauty, and people. Instagram images can easily be shared to other platforms like Twitter, Tumblr, and Facebook to quickly catch the attention of followers in those spaces.

Meanwhile the University of Texas at Austin encourages students to share their photos with them, using specific hashtags: #HookEm, #Longhorns, #UTAustin, #UTTower, and #WhatStartsHere along with specific seasonal or event-based hashtags like #UTsummer. This helps current, former, and potential students feel connected to the university even when they’re not on campus– or feel like they’re not missing out during a semester abroad.

They also have a separate Instagram account just for Longhorn football.

The bottom line? Instagram is the best place to share engaging images that will make students feel more connected to them, or attract them to become students in the first place. 

3. On Twitter: Share information quickly in critical situations

Twitter has already proven itself to be an invaluable resource for quick dissemination of information during a natural or man-made crisis, on a campus or otherwise.

In less serious situations, universities and colleges can use it to answer FAQs from new or prospective students, provide information and reminders about university events and deadlines, and share resources for students.

They can also host tweet chats to address specific topics of interest to current students, incoming students, potential students, and alums. For example, the University of Michigan Medical School hosts tweet chats to answer questions about their program, and the University of Central Missouri has hosted two allowing attendees to chat with the school’s president.

The bottom line? Twitter is the best way for universities to connect with their communities in real time. 

4. On Facebook: Provide an easily-found base

Facebook is the perfect social home base: A university profile can share resources and lead students back to other platforms. Users are comfortable using it to ask questions, and page administrators can answer them in a place that makes it easy for them to be seen by someone who might come looking to ask something similar. There’s also a review system in place, to let potential and incoming students know what life is really like on campus, like these from UT Austin’s Facebook page

UT FB Reviews

5. On Pinterest and Snapchat: Go the extra mile

While most people- especially the younger generation- expect to find some kind of social presence for businesses and institutions, they don’t expect them to be on the newer platforms. Universities with the resources have the opportunity to really connect with their students in these places, providing additional resources that will really make a difference. What do you pack for freshman year of college? How can you decorate your dorm room in a way that’s more unique than just slapping up a Pink Floyd poster? A pinboard can answer those things and more, while Snapchat can give quick and intimate looks at life around campus, snippets of lectures, a look at a spontaneous snowball fight, and more.

Drake University uses Pinterest to share Bulldog culture, while the University of Houston sends snaps to share their story with students and followers:

The bottom line? Meeting students where they are and don’t expect you to be- in a way that isn’t condescending or pandering- will win major bonus points.

The bottom line?

Universities engage their students best when they speak to them and share resources in their own language, in the platforms they already use. Strategies should play to each platform’s strengths, without sacrificing creativity.

Written by Sarah

August 27th, 2014 at 9:39 am

The Week in Social Analytics #116

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

10 Online Marketing Metrics You Need To Be Measuring [from Forbes; written by Jayson DeMers]

“This is because the return on investment on marketing is, in many cases, unpredictable. . .Solid metrics give you the insight to overcome this hurdle of unpredictability.”

How to Develop Rapport With Influencers via Social Media [from Marketing Profs; written by Vibhu Satpaul]

“Have different KPIs for different social media channels. After all, those channels are different from each other; your approach to each will be different, as will which objective is best suited for each.”

What is ‘best practice’? [from Econsultancy; written by Graham Oakes]

“No matter how badly we do, if we can suggest that thousands of other professionals would have done exactly the same in our situation, then we’re safe. No one can blame us for the failure. We were just unlucky.”

How Are Marketers Planning to Maximize Their Value in the Next Year? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Asked to choose their top 3 from 10 options, marketers responding from around the world converged on one clear response: improving customer segmentation and targeting. . .The focus on segmentation and targeting signals that marketers will be paying a great deal of attention to marketing analytics.”

The Secret Sauce For Creating Epic Curated Content [from Heidi Cohen]

“Epic curated content is a major content marketing effort that’s both original content and curated content because it’s co-created with participants.”

12 Ways to Boost Your Visual Media Performance [from Geoff Livingston]

“7) Twitter has gone the way of visuals, too. Make sure your work is noticed by using Twitter Cards to feature images and other information, such as a sign-up form.

Use Twitter Cards to feature full-sized images in the news stream.”

How Using Images in Social Media Marketing Can Help Improve Business [from Social Media Today; written by Nilay Dhamsania]

“Just think about all the updates, posts, tweets, status messages and pins you see every day. What is it that makes you read or click through a post? A careful analysis shows that most activity in social media sites is triggered by visual representations or images.”

How to Use Instagram Hashtags to Expand Your Reach [from Social Media Examiner; written by Eric Sornoso]

“At this point, Instagram hashtag density tends to be much greater than Twitter’s because companies realize the success of their Instagram marketing depends on proper hashtagging.”

Emphasis added.

The Moment of Truth: Best Practices For Discovering More Moments to Engage [from Social Media Today; written by Bernadette Coleman]

“These vital moments are where you capture your customer, that moment of truth. It’s the time when a consumer shows that they are intent on purchasing something. Basically this is when all your social media, blogging, advertising, coding, among many other things you do collide. The question you seriously need to ask is, will you be the one to meet their needs?”

Written by Sarah

August 22nd, 2014 at 8:14 am

The best back-to-school campaigns on Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr

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The back-to-school crowd these days differs from the Trapper Keepers and Lisa Frank folders of yesteryear in that they’ve grown up not only online, but also on social media. Brands that want to connect with the kids of Generation Z understand this and put themselves in all of the places their target audience spends their time, producing campaigns that connect across Tumblr dashboards and down Instagram timelines, and are amplified across Twitter.

The best: Keds, Teen Vogue, and Hollister team up for back-to-school across platforms

Personal style is a big deal for kids, preteens, and teens working out who they are and who they want to be, and Keds embraced this in their #KedsStyleTrial campaign run in conjunction with Teen Vogue and Hollister. The three week long campaign was officially run via Instagram, but Keds and Teen Vogue also cross-promoted it on their Tumblr and Twitter accounts:

Both also used the same image and similar messaging on their Instagram accounts, while Hollister went with a slightly different approach:

#KedsStyleTrial Keds #KedsStyleTrial Teen Vogue #KedsStyleTrial Hollister

The same is echoed in the Tumblr posts from Teen Vogue and Keds; Hollister doesn’t have a Tumblr, which seems like a mistake given their target demographic and the success of visual content on Tumblr, particularly of the fashion variety.

How it could be better

Even the best campaigns have room for improvement, and this one could have increased its reach with more participation from Hollister on Twitter, who chose to promote their own separate contest with Pretty Little Liars star Lucy Hale in lieu of this one:

Even a simple retweet of one of the contest promoting tweets from Keds or Teen Vogue’s accounts would have increased reach by putting the content in front of Hollister’s Twitter audience as well.

Other lessons to learn

Another back-to-school campaign on Instagram from Target used the hashtag #firstdayofschool to promote a charity campaign donating school supplies to children in need across America:

Target #firstdayofschool

What’s the problem? A hashtag like #firstdayofschool is going to be something posted by a wide variety of Instagram users and most of them will probably have no idea that Target’s campaign exists. This leads to difficulty in measurement; your results will be inflated with non-campaign related posts and it will be difficult to tell how successful and far reaching your campaign really was. A hashtag like #KedsStyleTrial works better as it’s unlikely to be generated spontaneously by other Instagram users, and it’s short enough to work when Instagram updates get cross-posted to Twitter (which also boosts your campaign’s reach on that platform).

The bottom line: Pick a hashtag based on your brand name and that’s unique enough not to be spontaneously used by others.

Final lessons

This campaign was planned to be recognizable and accessible to its target audience on the platforms where that audience spends time, which is the crux of any good cross-platform campaign. It was visually based, another plus for its target demographic.

The retail brands also take audience engagement a step further by sharing (or “regramming”) images from fans and followers on their Instagram accounts: Keds with #FanFriday and Hollister with #HCoStyle. That’s an extra incentive for fans and followers to enter the contest– what if they not only win, but also get their Instagram image wearing their winnings shared to either brand’s thousands of followers? Teen Vogue opts not to do this, but it’s a move that fits in with their approachable-yet-still-slightly-aloof fashion magazine brand.

Got it? Good. This will all be on the test, so leave any questions you have in the comments.

Written by Sarah

August 21st, 2014 at 4:16 pm

Five ways to embrace Twitter as a visual medium

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We’ve been hearing a lot lately about the importance of using visuals in your social media. Because human minds process visuals faster than text, they can be a much more succinct way of communicating your point. While words themselves probably aren’t going anywhere anytime soon (you are reading this, after all), incorporating more visual elements into your social efforts can catch more attention than just words alone– particularly on a fast-paced platform like Twitter.

Twitter’s updated features support visual media

The good news is that Twitter has made some updates in the past few months that support visual content on their platform, perhaps because of the growing popularity of photo and video platforms like Instagram, Vine and Snapchat.

Although many people took Twitter disabling Instagram display cards as a blow to cross-platform sharing, there’s a workaround for it that doesn’t require you to directly upload Instagram images to Twitter (although that might not be a bad idea; tailoring content for individual platforms is a best practice). 

Last fall, Twitter improved embedded images in tweets to make them bigger, bolder, and much more noticeable. 

And while less public, another update made it possible to send images privately in DMs and let the world know that Twitter understands the importance and impact of visual messaging as their users have been asking for it.

Finally and most recently, Twitter launched an update that lets you embed tweets within tweets. These appear more like an image than just a wall of text and can be a good callback to a point you were making previously, or to call back to a blog post you shared if it’s relevant in a conversation you’re currently having 

 What does this mean for brands using Twitter?

You can no longer rely on 140 characters of words alone to get your message across; snappy visuals are more important than ever. Not sure how to approach it? Here are a few tips to get you started:

  1. Figure out what kind of information you’re trying to convey. Can you get the entire message across in a picture, or should you choose an image that will catch attention and direct it back to a longer post elsewhere? 
  2. Infographics are popular, but they’re not right for everything. Especially if you have a very large or long infographic with tiny detail, don’t try to post the entire thing on Twitter. Post a section of it instead; this will pique interest and redirect traffic back to your blog or website.
  3. Test the same posts with different images. Try pairing an eye-catching image with one tweet, and an eye-catching image with text overlaying it on another. See how both do, and keep testing. Soon you’ll know which type your audience prefers. (But remember, this could change over time.)
  4. Test the same image across platforms. One style might do better on Twitter than on Instagram or Tumblr. See what your audience likes and tweak things for each platform.
  5. Be sure you’re using images you have permission to use. Use photos with a creative commons license if you don’t have your own photo resources.

The final word.

Before you post something or propose it as an idea to your team: Is it interesting and eye-catching to you? If it’s not, then you might want to rethink your approach.

Written by Sarah

August 19th, 2014 at 9:19 am

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The Week in Social Analtyics #115

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Brand Storytelling Beyond the Marketing Silo [from Business2Community; written by Anton Rius]

“Content, then, can play a part in nurturing the relationship far beyond the point of sale. With a holistic content strategy, the marketing department becomes less of a vertical within the organization and instead reaches across many departments and can affect multiple company initiatives.”

Content Marketing and Social Media: What Nonprofits Must Know [from Maximize Social Business; written by Claire Axelrad]

“. . .content marketing is not a synonym for social media. Nor is it a synonym for social deployment.”

3 Big Benefits Brands Can Get From Visual Content on Instagram [from Jeff Bullas; written by Mairead Ridge]

“. . .90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual, and visuals are processed 60,000 times faster than text. Instagram’s visual appeal is a very effective way to showcase products and influence purchasing decisions.”

Is Snapchat Right for Your Brand? | Infographic [from Social Times; written by Kimberlee Morrison]

A simple flowchart can be made even simpler: If Snapchat’s demographics match your target audience, then that’s where you need to be.

How 12 Brands Used Snapchat [from Fast Company; written by Jeff Beer]

“A recent Comscore report found that with 32.9% penetration, Snapchat was the third most popular social app among 18-34-year-olds (behind Facebook and Instagram, but ahead of Twitter, Pinterest, and Vine). And if you look at just the 18-24-year-old base, the app has 50% penetration. The company is said to have about 30 million active users and claims that people send and view more than 700 million pictures and 500 million “stories”–which allow brands to create longer narratives that last 24 hours–a day.”

If that’s your target audience, then you need to pay attention to how these brands are using Snapchat to inform your own strategy. Want even more on Snapchat for brands? Check out our pieces: Snapchat for brands part I: The basics & brand specifics and Snapchat for brands part II: Brands who do it well.

Will your company’s social media efforts pay off? [from All Twitter; written by Shea Bennett

“Here’s a few social media truisms that many brands simply don’t want to hear.

1. Social media success takes time. Don’t expect overnight success. While customers increasingly expecting an almost instantaneous response to their enquiries, generating a worthwhile return on investment (ROI) requires considerable effort and patience.

2. Social media success takes resources. Do you have someone with several hours of quality time per week available to dedicate to your social strategy?

3. Social media success takes you out of your comfort zone. Are you prepared to share other people’s content in your social channels – even that of your competitors? Are you will to engage with other people and open conversations? Do you create original content that other people will want to share? Are you able to handle and respond to public criticism and customer complaints?”

Five Signs Your Company is Ready For a Brand Ambassador Program [from Mack Collier]

“The companies that aren’t ready for a Brand Ambassador program are the ones that view their customers as transactions, not people.”

US CMOs Rank Their Biggest Concerns [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

What’s your biggest concern, CMO?

Written by Sarah

August 15th, 2014 at 9:38 am

In case of emergency: Cruise lines and crisis communication on Twitter, Part II

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Costa Concordia Instagram

People fascinated by a disaster will create their own news accounts, that may or may not contain misinformation. This is happening on networks outside of Twitter as well, like this example on Instagram.

We’ve previously discussed how airlines should handle crisis communication in case of an emergency, and recently we shared the first part of the plan for cruise lines to do the same. This is the second part, which picks up after looking at what cruise lines should look for on Twitter, to what they should measure during and after a crisis, plus what to look for on platforms outside of Twitter.

What to measure on Twitter in times of crisis, and after

Now that you know what to look for, you need to have a plan in place for how to measure it. What, exactly, should you be measuring on Twitter as a crisis unfolds?

Before; or what you should have set up right now

Ideally you will already have Trackers set up to capture what we mentioned previously- tweets directly to your official handle, mentions of your brand in any variety of spelling imaginable, any well-known nicknames your brand has (official or not), and the ports you operate from. If you’re not already doing that, now is the time to implement Trackers or take frequent snapshots (using something like our aptly named snapshot reports) around those terms once a situation arises and begins to unfold.

If your resources have grown since you first made your plan, consider monitoring your major competitors and major keywords related to your industry as well.

During a crisis

Often during a crisis situation, a hashtag will be born organically. If you’re being proactive about communicating via Twitter, however, don’t hesitate to create one of your own and immediately set up a Tracker to measure it, or take continual snapshots of the situation. If another hashtag emerges organically, use that one in your messaging as well and be sure you’re tracking both.

After a crisis

If everything flies by too quickly and you’re a small enough team not to have time to set up Trackers or take frequent enough snapshots of the situation, a historical option to capture the entire incident is available. This can also be used to fill in any noticeable gaps in your data once you’ve begun to look through everything you’ve gathered.

In the aftermath of the event, you might also want to track a specific news story (using specific key words from the title if it’s unique enough not to return a lot of noise, or you can track via a specific URL) that went around if it directly involved comments from your brand, or got a lot of circulation with commentary from people passing it around. This will give you a much more accurate read on the sentiment around your crisis messaging, and let you see any missed opportunities, as well as highlight every win.

Go the extra mile

Once you have all of this data and you can clearly see how the situation unfolded and evaluate the strength of your response, take it a step further: What can you plan better next time, with this experience? What did you and your team do really well, that you should be sure to praise and also pass on as protocol to new team members? This knowledge can be distilled and turned into training and on-boarding materials for any new communications employees in the future.

If you’re not a cruise line (or an airline) a lot of these tactics still apply to you; if you’re a hotel, for example, you can offer to put up stranded travelers or victims of a natural disaster or other tragedy. Car rental companies and car sharing services can work out deals to get stranded people home if they don’t have far to go. For a less serious crisis, tour companies can even offer to keep stranded passengers entertained with local sites while they’re waiting for delayed travel to get sorted out.

Any of these companies can work out deals with each other ahead of a crisis to come in and support each other if and when it makes sense to.

Platforms other than Twitter

While Twitter is the best platform to use during a crisis because of the speed at which you’re able to share information and connect with concerned parties as well as news outlets, you need to be sure you have messaging in place on all of the other platforms you also have a presence on in the case of an emergency. For Facebook, be sure to make periodic, informative updates and answer as many questions as you can from concerned parties that may not be on Twitter. Do as much as you can with the resources that you have; don’t be afraid to make a post and then direct everyone to Twitter or your website for more information if those are the two places you plan to concentrate updates.

Tumblr will support text updates and it’s also a place where you can reblog information from the news outlets also on Tumblr, but it’s much more difficult to answer questions if they come in the form of reblogs. Do answer any questions directed to your inbox, publishing those that may help answer the similar questions of others.

Photo-based platforms like Snapchat and Instagram are more difficult to navigate; it’s hard to think of a tactful snap for announcing information around an emergency situation, but if that’s the only line of communication open to you and you’re in touch with your customers there, don’t hesitate to do what you can. If you do feel it’s appropriate to post a screenshot with emergency update protocols on your Instagram account directing followers to your website or Twitter for ongoing information, do so. Many of these details will depend on what’s right for your brand, the nature of the crisis, and the resources available as it unfolds.

The takeaway

The bottom line is to listen and step in where you’re needed, even if you’re not expected to.

Written by Sarah

August 12th, 2014 at 10:12 am

The Week in Social Analytics #114

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

5 Measurement Pitfalls to Avoid [from Mashable; written by Eliza Berman]

“. . . in the quest to back up every move with cold, hard data, it can be easy to mistake any old numbers for useful numbers. Not all data is created equal, and the best way to ensure you’ll be collecting the right data is to develop the right set of performance metrics.”

How To Corrupt The Social Data You’re Gathering (And Kill Your Focus Group In The Process) [from Marketing Land; written by Kevin Ryan]

“There is a big difference between listening to your best customers and lurking among them to gather information; in the former, you have initiated a meaningful dialogue, while the latter will leave your customers feeling like lab rats.”

How To Set Marketing Goals You Can Actually Achieve: Advice From The Experts [from KISSMetrics; written by Chloe Mason Gray]

A few of the key takeaways:

  • Take time to truly understand your current position in order to set achievable marketing goals.
  • Choose 1-2 core goals that impact the bottom line and 3-5 supporting goals. Anything more than that will distract you from what’s most important.
  • Alternatively, try focusing completely on just one goal.
  • Pick goals that you genuinely care about achieving (be authentic).
  • Don’t just focus on the finish line; enjoy the process of achieving your goal.
  • Set the minimum bar at delivering on at least 70% of the planned improvements each quarter.
  • Approach each new marketing goal with as much data and information as possible.
  • Make sure your short-term goals always support your long-term prospects.

How the World Sees You Should Govern Your Social Media Style [from Convince and Convert; written by Jay Baer]

“…if you can understand how people see you at your best, then you can simply focus on those areas where you’re most primed to succeed and avoid the areas that are going to be like quicksand.”

How to Write a Crisis Communications Plan [from Spin Sucks; written by Gini Dietrich]

“But the real issue isn’t that they did bad things—we’re all human and we all make mistakes—it’s that they were handled by people who didn’t have any crisis communications experience.”

Pair with our piece on crisis communications for airlines, as well as part I of our crisis communications for cruise lines (look for part II next week.)

The Five Essential Elements of a Great Company Story [from Marketing Profs; written by Sandra Stewart]

Not every company is the wunderkind of tech, but every company does have a story to tell.

How Digital Media Has Changed the Art of Storytelling | Infographic [from Social Times; written by Kimberlee Morrison]

“From ‘blog’ being named the 2004 Merriam-Webster word of the year, to the rise of content curation and visual media — the art of storytelling is a craft that remains at the heart of digital media.”

Who Are You? How to Develop a Brand Identity for Instagram [from Likeable Media; written by Roly Gonzalez]

You have to be authentic to who your brand and develop a brand identity on Instagram that accomplishes the following:

  • Stays true to your overall brand identity
  • Conveys a straight forward persona to your audience
  • Utilizes the tone, feel, and language of the platform

What Types of Brand Videos Do Consumers Want to Watch? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“According to the Levels Beyond survey, consumers are most interested in how-to, instructional or tutorial videos (67%), followed by:

  • comedy or spoof videos (42%);
  • product/informational videos (34%);
  • micro-documentaries, telling the story of a person or event (33%); and
  • animations/infographic videos (30%).”

Written by Sarah

August 8th, 2014 at 8:54 am

In case of emergency: Cruise lines and crisis communication on Twitter, Part I

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Costa Concordia News

An unofficial Twitter account for Costa Concordia news that sprung up in the wake of the ship’s running aground. If you don’t come forward in these spaces, someone else will do it for you.

The Costa Concordia is back in the news this summer, being towed away for salvage after its disastrous running aground two years ago. We’ve written about airlines and how they should use Twitter for crisis communications, and thought we’d  make that same approach more specific for other areas of the travel industry.

This first part will cover what cruise lines should be monitoring for before a crisis- meaning the plan that you have in place- and in the early stages of a crisis breaking out.

What cruise lines should look for on Twitter

Social media is both a blessing and a curse in a time of crisis. While companies are able to rapidly disseminate information, share updates, and directly interact with the public in real time, misinformation can also spread very quickly on platforms like Twitter.

For something as high stakes as trans-oceanic travel, it’s important for cruise lines to know what to listen for and measure, particularly during the stressful summer holiday travel season. We have some advice for creating just such a plan, or reassessing it if you already have one.

What to look for on Twitter during a crisis

First, you need to set up a monitoring plan for Twitter. Exactly what you’re looking for will depend on the nature of the crisis you’re dealing with and your communication goals around each type of crisis.

In case of common crisis

For ship departure delays and stranded, angry customers who might have missed a boat, for example, you’ll definitely want to focus on catching every mention of your brand on Twitter and doing everything you possibly can to make affected customers feel listened to and understood. If possible, give your customer service representatives on Twitter the power to offer reconciliations: everything from drink packages, to discounts on future cruises, full or partial refunds; even free accommodations on a future departure if the situation is bad enough.

This is vital for turning an angry person who swears they will never cruise with you again- whether the circumstances of the situation were under your control or not- and someone who will brag about your customer service on the same forum they just used to share their unhappiness, while remaining a customer.

In case of not-so-common crisis

If the situation is more serious- like the Costa Concordia running aground off the coast of Italy, or a natural disaster like a hurricane- you don’t have to bother to look for misinformation; it will already be out there. Use Twitter as a way to let everyone know you’re aware of the situation, that the safety of your employees and passengers is your first priority, and to make any updates you can on the situation, waiting as long as possible to confirm new information before you send it out while still making any corrections as necessary.

In both cases- and the rest of the time, as a general rule of thumb- you should be monitoring not only direct replies to your brand’s handle on Twitter, but also mentions of your company name in any variety of spelling imaginable: any well-known nicknames your brand has (official or not), and the ports your operate from. Depending on your resources, you might want to include the names of prominent employees, such as founders, board members, and c-level executives. Something like our TweetReach Pro Trackers will allow you to do this. (We’ll talk more about what to measure in part II.)

Go the extra mile

Monitoring mentions of the ports you operate from will be vital should a tragic incident occur and you need to reroute your ship or make accommodations for passengers waiting to board, and the rest of the time it will give you an advantage in listening to and addressing problems you might not have caught otherwise. Is one of your passengers stuck with a delayed flight home and without a hotel room? If you have the connections to help them, you will change everything about how they end up perceiving their trip.

Monitor your competitors too: Is a passenger stranded by a competitor somewhere you have a ship in port, or are approaching, and you have room onboard? You’ve just filled an empty cabin and probably won a new loyal customer.

If you go the extra mile and make someone’s day, you’ve reversed their story of a bad trip gone awry and will more likely be the first brand on their mind the next time they travel.

What next?

Look for part II, which covers more about what to measure during and after a crisisplus what to look for on platforms outside of Twitter.

Written by Sarah

August 5th, 2014 at 10:00 am

The Week in Social Analytics #113

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

10 very cool examples of experiential marketing [from Econsultancy; written by David Moth]

Looking to go in a new direction with your next campaign? Use these examples to inspire.

The Highest Converting Images to Use on Social Media Networks [from Social Media Today; written by Jesse Aaron]

The right image can make all the difference in catching your audience’s attention.

Why It Might Be Time to Completely Change Your Social Media Strategy [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

“In the shotgun approach, you don’t worry as much about building a big audience in any particular network, but instead building a touchpoint corral around each of your customers and fans. The holy grail isn’t one million Facebook fans, but being connected to each of your fans in as many places as possible. The more places you are connected to your customers and fans, the more places you have permission to contact them, the greater the chances that you will actually be able to contact them somehow, somewhere.

Emphasis original.

A Social Media Contest, Cole Haan, Pinterest, and the Rules [from Spin Sucks; written by Gini Dietrich]

While this happened a while ago, it’s a good reminder that brands need to know the rules before launching a campaign on a new platform. No one wants to be the one that gets made an example of by the FTC.

Want more on Pinterest? Here’s 7 Ways to Make Your Video Stand Out on Pinterest and The secret to Pinterest: no faces and new heights [Infographic].

What’s in a Detailed Buyer Persona Anyway? [from Business2Community; written by Erin Cushing]

“In the B2B realm, there are a few common areas that are always useful, and some information that is only useful in specific circumstances. Here’s the down-low on what you should consider when building your buyer persona.”

How You Can Tap Into The Power Of Twitter [from Heidi Cohen]

This piece covers 6 Twitter Community Structures Simplify Your Work; below is the Brand Cluster Twitter Structure:

“High visibility, popular brands and celebrities attract large Twitter followings who tweet, comment and share information about them. BUT followers have NO connection to each other.”

These communities tend to have large or very large followings but little connection between all of the accounts that make up the following. Also:

“It’s interesting to note that…Brand Cluster Twitter Communities do very little of their own tweeting.”

Click through for some actionable marketing tips around this Twitter community structure. Also great from Heidi this week: 7 Tactics For Content Curation Success.

Real-Time Marketing Isn’t Just About Twitter: MTV uses Snapchat, ESPN’s on Twitter, and Hyundai works Tumblr [from Adweek; written by Garett Sloane]

“Snapchat, Tumblr and Pinterest ‘have the potential to change the way the industry thinks about real-time marketing,’ said Kevin Lange, Starcom MediaVest Group’s svp of social.”

3 TV Shows Doing Social Media the Right Way [from Likeable Media; written by Jessica Chen]

“One of the most well-developed marketing plans in the industry, the marketing campaign for True Blood is a four-part ongoing project. The online campaign features strategic blogger outreach and behind-the-scenes footage and interviews. HBO most excels in maintaining the True Blood image throughout multiple platforms: the show recently created a blog for one of the ‘newly-turned’ vampires.”

When Twitter creates its own, online TV

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Comedy Central now takes requests for its online, sketch series CC: Social Scene, hosted by comedian Paul Scheer. Twitter users can use the hashtag #CCSocialScene to make suggestions based on each week’s topic for a chance to have it included in the next sketch.

This use of a hashtag on Twitter is a natural social extension of the interactive nature of improv and sketch shows at most comedy clubs, taking suggestions from the audience for upcoming scenes. While the episodes haven’t been shared across platforms yet, doing so would maximize exposure to reach each part of their audience where they prefer to spend their time, still drawing them back to Twitter if they wish to participate.

Executing that would make this an excellent example of a cross-platform campaign.

Want tips for running one of those yourself? Check out 3 dos and don’ts for making it work. 

Written by Sarah

July 29th, 2014 at 2:06 pm